Find Rita Gay in the United States

We found 30 entries for Rita Gay in the United States. The name Rita Gay has over 28 birth records, 6 death records, 5 criminal/court records, 83 address records, 22 phone records and more. Get full address, contact info, background report and more!

Showing 4 records of 78 Criminal Records & Traffic Violations that matched the name Rita Gay:

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Showing 4 records of 78 Criminal Records & Traffic Violations that matched the name Rita Gay:

Find Rita Gay in the United States

We found 30 entries for Rita Gay in United States. The name Rita Gay has over 28 birth records, 6 death records, 5 criminal/court records, 83 address records, 22 phone records and more. Get full address, contact info, background report and more!

Find Rita Gay in the United States

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How many Rita Gay's have criminal or arrest records?

Showing 4 records of 53 Criminal Records & Traffic Violations that matched the name Rita Gay:

Disclaimer: By using this website, you accept the Spokeo Terms of Use. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). This site should not be used to make decisions about employment, tenant screening, or any purpose covered by the records were matched using first and last name only. The records below may not pertain to the individual that you’re looking for, and may or may not pertain to the same charge. Please make your own determination of the relevance of these court records.

Showing 4 records of 53 Criminal Records & Traffic Violations that matched the name Rita Gay:

She seems to say and do whatever she wants, making her an incredibly fun character to watch

This is a scene from the second-season premiere of the Danish hit dramatic-comedy series Rita, and it sums the show up nicely: Rita is a teacher. Rita is unconventional. Rita is unapologetic about sexuality, if a bit lacking in discernment. Rita is, in fact, sleeping with Rasmus. She’s also a single mum who loves her three children – two of them young adults, one a teenager still attending the school where she works.

Rita is distinctive with her long hair, leather jacket and endless selection of plaid shirts (Credit: Per Arnesen / TV 2)

Premiering in 2012 on Danish TV channel TV 2, the set-up is classic: Rita’s students love her, but she struggles when dealing with other adults and her own children. She smokes and uses casual sex as an escape, eschewing the headmaster’s attempts at a lasting, committed relationship with her. She seems to say and do whatever she wants, making her an incredibly fun character to watch. Her actions result in riveting conflicts: she defends a constantly disruptive student, but has trouble understanding her own son’s challenges when he comes out as gay. She’s angry at her own mother for being selfish, but she shrugs off her daughter’s admission that she’s dyslexic.

Rita’s popularity makes sense: it reflects progressive Scandinavian values (Credit: Per Arnesen / TV 2)

Rita gives viewers a realistic look at middle-class life in a small Danish town. And the key to its success is the earthy lead performance of Mille Dinesen, who won a Monte Carlo TV Festival Golden Nymph for inhabiting Rita so fully. The show’s daring comes up over and over in critics’ and fans’ praise for the show around the world. “While I am not quite as ballsy as her, in a fantasy world I wouldn’t mind being her for a day or so!” wrote Maureen Thomas, a blogger on Medium’s Legendary Women channel. “Kudos to Danish TV and Netflix for bringing us another thinking-woman’s ‘chick show.’”

That character has made the show a Danish and international success over its four-season run. An average of 842,000 Danish viewers watched each episode in its first season. Though Netflix doesn’t release viewership numbers, used Google Trends data to determine the most popular shows in each country in 2017, with Rita topping the list in Denmark. Netflix had such faith in the show that it co-produced third and fourth seasons and began offering it internationally, even for notoriously subtitle-resistant Americans. Dutch and French versions were also produced, as well as a spin-off miniseries for another quirky teacher character, Hjørdis.

A spin-off miniseries was made about Hjørdis, another quirky teacher character (Credit: Per Arnesen / TV 2)

Rita’s popularity makes sense: it reflects progressive Scandinavian values, with a liberated female main character and plotlines tackling sexuality, learning disabilities, abortion and other controversial topics with refreshing honesty. American feminist writer Pris Blossom wrote, for instance: “Rather than made to seem a frightening procedure to be avoided at all costs, abortion is completely normalised, even encouraged at times on the show.” Not unrelatedly, she adds later, “Denmark looks like a freaking awesome place to live and watching the show makes you want to look into moving there pronto.”

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In case you haven’t heard, it’s no fun being Rita Ora at the moment.

For the past few days the singer has been at the centre of a heated debate about sexuality and queer representation within pop music thanks to the release of her latest single “Girls”, alongside artists Charli XCX, Bebe Rexha and Cardi B. The song, your usual anthemic pop banger, has been accused of trivialising queer women’s experiences and pandering to the male gaze. With lyrics like “Sometimes, I just wanna kiss girls, girls, girls/Red wine, I just wanna kiss girls, girls, girls”, it’s clear to see why.

American singer Hayley Kiyoko, who identifies as a lesbian, led the charge when she expressed her disappointment in the song in a statement posted on her Twitter account last weekend. Kiyoko said: “This type of message is dangerous because it completely belittles and invalidates the very pure feelings of an entire community.” Criticism soon followed from singer Kehlani, musician Shura and Katie Gavin, one third of the band MUNA, who all accused the song of being tone deaf and delivering a dangerous message.

Their sentiment is understandable, especially given the history of pop stars using the term bisexual as a cloak put on to court attention and secure record sales. Lest we forget singing duo t.A.T.u. and their kissing in the rain antics which nabbed them a number one single or singer Jessie J who deemed her bisexuality as simply a phase.

12 August 2020

In a bid to remedy some of the flack she’s received (note that none of her other female collaborators have been pulled up on this song and its message), the singer took to her Twitter account to out herself. In a short statement she admitted to having romantic relationships with both men and women in the past and that the song was never intended to offend the LGBTQ+ community.

But looking at the wider picture here, Rita Ora shouldn’t really have had to resort to proving her sexuality to justify the song. Perhaps this is because I’m a fan, but Rita has always presented herself as sexually fluid. She’s even spoken candidly about her rumoured relationship with model Cara Delavigne in the past, which should at least appease some of the naysayers who accuse the singer of being a straight woman fetishising queerness for her own personal gain.

Furthermore, it’s also very telling that Harry Styles, who sparked rumours about his own bisexuality when he released his song “Medicine” with the lyrics “Here to take my medicine, take my medicine/Treat you like a gentleman”, wasn’t given the same lynch mob treatment as Rita and was allowed to glide through the moment unscathed. If anything, he was hailed as a queer hero with all sections of the media writing think pieces and articles praising the singer for his bravery. What exactly is the difference between the two singers besides the glaringly obvious?