Marvin Gaye – Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler) Übersetzung

Dah, dah, dah, dah dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Rockets, moon shots Spend it on the have nots Money, we make it Fore we see it you take it Oh, make you wanna holler The way they do my life Make me wanna holler The way they do my life This ain’t livin‘, This ain’t livin‘ No, no baby, this ain’t livin‘ No, no, no Inflation no chance To increase finance Bills pile up sky high Send that boy off to die Oh, make me wanna holler The way they do my life Make me wanna holler The way they do my life Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Hang ups, let downs Bad breaks, set backs Natural fact is I can’t pay my taxes Oh, make me wanna holler And throw up both my hands Yea, it makes me wanna holler And throw up both my hands Crime is increasing Trigger happy policing Panic is spreading God knows where we’re heading Oh, make me wanna holler They don’t understand Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Mother, mother Everybody thinks we’re wrong Who are they to judge us Simply cause we wear our hair long

Dah, dah, dah, dah dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Rockets, Mond Schüsse Verbringen Sie es auf die Habenichtse Geld, wir machen es Fore sehen wir es nehmen Sie es Oh, machen Sie wollen Holler Die Art, wie sie mein Leben tun Make Me Wanna Holler Die Art, wie sie mein Leben tun Dies wird Livin nicht ‚, das ist nicht Livin‘ Nein, kein Baby, das ist nicht Livin ‚ Nein, nein, nein Inflation keine Chance Zur Erhöhung der Finanzen Rechnungen türmen sich hoch am Himmel Senden Sie diesen Jungen weg zu sterben Oh, machen mich wollen Holler Die Art, wie sie mein Leben tun Make Me Wanna Holler Die Art, wie sie mein Leben tun Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Hang-ups, lassen Tiefen Bad Pausen, Rückschläge Natürliche Tatsache ist, Ich kann meine Steuern nicht zahlen Oh, machen mich wollen Holler Und werfen meine Hände Ja, es macht mich wollen Holler Und werfen meine Hände Kriminalität nimmt zu Trigger Happy Polizei Panik breitet sich Gott weiß, wo wir hinwollen Oh, machen mich wollen Holler Sie verstehen nicht, Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Dah, dah, dah Mutter, Mutter Jeder denkt, wir sind falsch Wer sind sie uns zu beurteilen Einfach weil wir tragen unsere Haare lang

‘Inner City Blues’: Marvin Gaye Completes A Social Commentary Trinity

On October 9, 1971, ‘Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler),’ the latest 45 from Marvin’s immortal ‘What’s Going On’ album, bowed on the US pop and R&B charts.

‘Inner City Blues’: Marvin Gaye Completes A Social Commentary Trinity

Song Review by Ed Hogan

It wouldn’t tell the following year that Curtis Mayfield’s classic Superfly soundtrack would be released, yet Marvin Gaye’s „Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler)“ has some of the rich imagery that would make that album so poignant and influence hip-hop/rap artists decades later. It’s a credit to Gaye’s amazing talent that he could still, after years of having international hits, relate to the travails of inner-city life. Though he sang in a smooth tenor, Gaye’s pain and anger shines through. A single from his gold masterpiece What’s Going On, „Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler)“ went to number one R&B for two weeks and number nine pop in late 1971.

 Song Review by Ed Hogan

Writers & Publishers

from the album What’s Going On ·Copyright: Writer(s): James Nyx, Marvin Gaye Lyrics Terms of Use

Dah, dah, dah, dahdah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dahDah, dah, dah, dahDah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dahDah, dah, dahRockets, moon shotsSpend it on the have notsMoney, we make itFore we see it you take itOh, make you wanna hollerThe way they do my lifeMake me wanna hollerThe way they do my lifeThis ain’t livin‘, This ain’t livin’No, no baby, this ain’t livin’No, no, noInflation no chanceTo increase financeBills pile up sky highSend that boy off to dieMake me wanna hollerThe way they do my lifeMake me wanna hollerThe way they do my lifeDah, dah, dahDah, dah, dahHang ups, let downsBad breaks, set backsNatural fact isI can’t pay my taxesOh, make me wanna hollerAnd throw up both my handsYea, it makes me wanna hollerAnd throw up both my handsCrime is increasingTrigger happy policingPanic is spreadingGod know where we’re headingOh, make me wanna hollerThey don’t understandDah, dah, dahDah, dah, dahDah, dah, dah

Writers & Publishers

Marvin Gaye

Marvin Gaye (April 2, 1939 – April 1, 1984), born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr., was an American singer-songwriter and musician whose career spanned more than two decades. Born and raised in Washington, D.C., he was the son of a storefront minister of a local Pentecostal church sect and grew up singing gospel in church revivals as a young child. Gaye branched out into secular music as a teenager, joining the doo-wop group The Marquees, after returning from an honorable discharge from the United States Air Force, before the group was hired by Harvey Fuqua to be Harvey & The Moonglows. Following the band’s separation in 1960, Gaye began working as a session drummer for the Detroit music label, Anna, before signing with Motown Records in 1961, adding an „e“ to his s… more »

Marvin Gaye

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My favorite male artist. Nobody will ever match that voice. What a wonderful story Marvin could sing!

Let’s sign the petition to get the Marvin Gaye Forever stamp approved.

By VF Team

Marvin Gaye was not necessarily a visionary, he just described the injustices he witnessed around him. Instead it is an indictment on the widening gulf of inequality, racial instability and social hardship endured throughout America’s urban spaces that his words are as potent and relevant now, nearly 50 years on, as they were when this 7″ was first released.

They were as potent in 1981, when Gil Scott-Heron spoke of the Siege of New Orleans, and ten years later when Q-Tip called politicians “magicians” on Tribe’s ‘Youthful Expression’. It is a record covered and sampled both for its groove and its message.

Back in ’71 though, the track’s immediate catalyst was Motown co-writer James Nyx Jr.’s scathing analysis of misspent tax dollars – how could the US government be spending billions on sending astronauts to the moon, while life in the ghettos of Detroit remained so tough? Reading the paper one morning, Nyx was drawn to a story that referred to the ‘inner city’ – the neglected area they talked about. What better way, he thought, to sum up the issues that he and Gaye had written down – than a song entitled ‘Inner City Blues’.

Recorded in March and released in September ’71, Gaye produced the entire track at the studio nicknamed Hitsville USA – Motown’s first headquarters. The Tamla record – which topped the R&B charts and gained attention worldwide – also featured as the final track on the seminal What’s Going On – Gaye’s eleventh and most enduring album.

‘Inner City Blues’ has been on heavy rotation ever since, and its status as a classic continues to be underlined by the number of different versions out there. Some obvious, and others more obscure – here are some essentials that do justice to the original.

Marc Moulin and Co. were the first group to transform Gaye’s downtown masterpiece – an all-absorbing, beautifully executed cover with an air of spine-chilling serenity. And on one of the best jazz albums ever recorded in Belgium – Ball Of Eyes.

First served up as a single on Curtis Mayfield’s Curtom imprint, and on their Times Have Changed album a year later, the formidable soul group stamp their own style firmly onto Gaye’s hit. Be sure to check the track on the flip too – ‘We Must Be In Love’ – as sampled by J Dilla.

The New Jersey jazz vocalist gave the original a straight-up soul rewrite. Trombones; snapping snares; funked-up guitar phrases; the works – this track serves as a reminder of Vaughan’s understated versatility. Never mind her jazz routes, Vaughan carries this like the most soulful of her contemporaries.

A fast paced and funky instrumental take from the jazz organist, demonstrating how Gaye’s original translates to the dancefloor. Rolling drum breaks and saxophone solos take a driving seat in this funk rendition; strip away the powerful lyrics, and simply marvel at how captivating a simple hook can really be.

Given Gil’s activism on racial inequalities and city plight, this cover makes total sense. Stunningly arranged, his monologue discussing Mark Essex’s motivations during the New Orleans attacks of the early seventies hits hard.

“Politicians are magicians” Q-tip states sharply, as Reuben Wilson’s Hammond organ booms in the background. The Manhattan MC sprays his lyrics with a playfulness that makes any subject – however serious – completely palatable. During this outing, he touches on some important obstacles that the younger generation were getting to grips with in ’90.

Released as a reaction to the September 11th attacks, Theo Parrish twists and morphs Gaye’s vocals, into a murky, beatdown version scattered with news network samples, fractured percussion and smothered synth work. A dark, processed interpretation from one of Detroit’s foremost house producers.