The Best Gay Movies for Men

If you REALLY enjoy watching good movies in every genre, and appreciate a good story and characters.. Being gay or not, it doesn’t matter: Love is Universal. Don’t get me wrong girls, but this list is „specially“ for Guys. Who wants to feel connected somehow to another story. And maybe help them somehow. I don’t know… I tried not to be too pretentious with „cult“ movies, but also I tried not to be stupid with my choices. You see, I like Scorsese, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Malick, Kurosawa, Coppola… so I guess I’m a movie passionate in the average. =D I decided to include the BAD ones too, so you won’t waste your precious time! Check out my comments about the movies! The bads are at the end of the list! So, for now, there are few of them, but soon as I watch, I’ll update! xDIt’s in preference order!Any Suggestions? E-mail

The 20 best gay beaches in the world

Waves lapped gently against the shore, the sun beat down and warmed my every fiber, palm trees swayed in the breeze. As I took a sip of my ice-cold mojito, I asked Seby: “Is there anything better than a trip to the beach?”

I had to admit, he was right. Whether it’s the chance to get active in the water, show off your hard work in the gym or simply top up that tan, it’s no secret that many gay guys feel most fabulous at the beach. This has meant that gay beaches have popped up across the world down the years, providing a hotspot for local gay communities and gay tourists too. 

From vibrant city center beaches where summer nightlife lasts well into the early hours or more relaxed, isolated affairs with a cultivated vibe, gay beaches come in as many shapes, sizes, and guises as gay men. Whether you’re searching for the best gay beaches in the United States or fancy visiting a gay beach further afield, our rundown of the twenty best gay beaches in the world has got you covered.

The 20 best gay beaches in the world

Hot Legs (Short Gay Film)

Short Film produced by Underdog Productions (Pty) Ltd in 1995.

Note: This film contains some male nudity, contains material of a gay nature, and may be disturbing to younger viewers. It also contains some fast flash shots.

Written & Directed by Luiz DeBarossProduced by: Marc Schwinges

Starring:Tim: David DucasDave: Gerrie BarnardTim Jnr: Glen FineDave Jnr: Leon WeedKid One: Miguel BarrosKid Tow: Marcus MuddPoliceman One: Carlo GoertzPoliceman Two: Criag KellyMother: Mariana CarrilloSon: Sipho Khuzwago Moyo

Director of Photography: Peter PohorskyProduction Manager: Brendan RiceProduction Assistant: David HeckerFocus Puller: Greg PoissonGrip: Tony Slater

Sound: Jeremy HattinghSound: Ian MillerBoom Operator: Sean Kelly

Senior Make-up Artist: Adrienne CohenMake-Up Artist: Ionka Nel

Runners: Wayne Fick, Paul Hanrahan, Hal Couzens, Bronwyn Vermeulen, Oliver Galloway.

Post Production Advisor: Hal CouzensNon-Liner Editor: Llewelyn Roderick

Executive Producers: Marc Schwinges, Catherine Bester & Charlotte Bauer

Hot Legs (Short Gay Film)

The 50 Best LGBTQ Movies Ever Made

Here are the best movies that depict the queer experience in all its complexities.

The good news: this year you have time for some movies.

Under normal circumstances, June busts out all over with Pride Month parties and parades. The gay neighborhood thumps with house music. Your bank, cable company and sandwich shop rush to remind you of their support for the LGBTQ+ community. And if you can bear the crowds, you leave a Pride festival with a draft-beer buzz, an application for a rainbow-flag credit card, and a paper fan with Chelsea Handler’s face on it. It’s a lot, but it’s ours.

This year, the public events of LGBTQ Pride Month—much like sports, school, and life itself—are cancelled. We’re stuck inside unless we’re marching for police reform. The few bars that have reopened are for the reckless and foolish, and let’s be honest: there’s only so much dancing a person can do on Zoom. The conditions are optimal for you to catch up on your queer cinema.

We’ve come a ways in fifty years, from the self-loathing middle-aged men of The Boys In The Band to the peppy teens of Love, Simon. The range runs from the shoestring brilliance of The Watermelon Woman to the big-budget glitter-bomb that is Rocketman. 1982’s tentative Making Love derailed the careers of its two lead actors; 2017’s Call Me By Your Name cemented its pair as movie stars. While gay characters tended until much too recently to be one-dimensional, white, and doomed, in 2018 Barry Jenkins won a Best Picture Oscar telling the layered and hopeful story of a gay Black man in Moonlight.

There’s a lot of history to explore, and there’s never been a better time to do it. Borrow a streaming service password from family– however you define it!–and dive in.

If it feels a bit like a CW version of an Afterschool Special, that’s no mistake: teen-tv super-producer Greg Berlanti makes his feature film directorial debut here. It’s as chaste a love story as you’re likely to see in the 21st century— the hunky gardener who makes the title teen question his sexuality is wearing a long-sleeved shirt, for God’s sake—but you know what? The queer kids of the future need their wholesome entertainment too.

Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine play headmistresses at a school for girls who are accused by a student of being in a lesbian relationship. While the accusation is false, it nearly ruins the women’s standing in their community and threatens their friendship—and forces one of them to reevaluate her own identity.

A gay fantasia on Elton themes. An Elton John biopic was never going to be understated, but this glittering jukebox musical goes way over the top and then keeps going. It might be an overcorrection from the straight-washing of the previous year’s Bohemian Rhapsody, but when it’s this much fun, it’s best not to overthink it.

Charming Irish movie that answers the question: “What if John Hughes were Irish and gay?” Misfit Ned struggles at a rugby-obsessed boarding school until a mysterious new kid moves in and an unlikely friendship changes them both. Along the way, a rousing performance from Andrew Scott as an inspiring teacher with a secret of his own, and a rugby game set to a Rufus Wainwright song. Just the thing to lift your spirits.

The life of Cuba’s „transformistas“ is captured beautifully in this father-son story about a boy who wants to perform drag and his father, newly released from prison and unable to accept who his son is. Shot beautifully, with great music and a close look at Havana in all its run-down and colorful glory.

The quintessential ’80s lesbian romantic drama, Desert Hearts follows an English professor and a young sculptor as they fall in love at a Nevada ranch in the 1950s. Unique for its time, it sets its romance in a warm, affirming environment and lets its leads enjoy their relationship without angst or fear of death.

Ira Sachs’s autobiographical drama packs a hard punch as it follows a filmmaker, Erick, throughout his relationship with a young lawyer, Paul, which begins as a random sexual encounter and implodes following Paul’s drug and sex addiction.

Wong Kar-wai won Best Director at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival for this film about two Hong Kong men who emigrate to Buenos Aires, after the handover of Hong Kong to China put LGBT lives in jeopardy.

Former SNL head-writer and The Other Two co-creator Chris Kelly makes his directorial debut in a semi-autobiographical account of his mother’s death from cancer. Molly Shannon gives a devastating performance, the tragic qualities of the Sacramento gay bar are hilariously explored, and the viewer is forced to re-evaluate Train’s “Drops of Jupiter.” Given how much you will cry, this is perhaps a risky watch in a time when tissue paper is scarce. We say pull a full-size bath towel out of the cabinet and dive in.

Cheryl Dunye directs and stars in this microbudget indie about an African-American lesbian searching for an uncredited black actress from a 1930s film. Along the way, she falls in and out of love, and meets the real Camille Paglia.

Julianne Moore and Annette Bening play lesbian mothers to two teenagers whose blissful modern family is rocked when their kids seek out their sperm-doner father played by Mark Ruffalo. The family unit falls into crisis when his sudden appearance into their lives causes a rift between the two women as well as their kids

Starring Mariel Hemingway and a raft of real-life track and field stars, Personal Best follows a young bisexual pentathlete vying for a spot on the U.S. Olympic Team and exploring a relationship with her lesbian coach—played by Olympic hurdler Patrice Donnelly.

Eliza Hittman’s dark and moody film plays out a bit like a thriller, one in which a Brooklyn teenager named Frankie (a superb Harris Dickinson, in a nearly wordless performance), who spends his idle hours hanging with his delinquent friends, fooling around with his girlfriend, or hooking up with men he meets online. Beach Rats is a provocative look at the personal and secret urges we often fear will come out into the light.

Gus Van Sant’s loose Shakespearean adaptation brought the New Queer Cinema movement into the mainstream, with River Phoenix as a young, narcoleptic hustler and Keanu Reeves as his best friend and unrequited love interest.

„Don’t you know I would have gone through life half-awake if you’d had the decency to leave me alone?“ All the lushness of a Merchant Ivory production, with gay men at its center. Even if this weren’t a beautiful, affecting film, Hugh Grant’s hair alone would earn it a spot on this list.

Peter Jackson was journeying through fantasy worlds long before Lord of the Rings—albeit one conjured up by two very real New Zealand school girls (played by then-newcomers Kate Winslet and Melanie Lynskey) who escape their own realities through their imaginations. But their connection turns intense and dangerous when they conspire to commit murder in one of the most notorious true crime stories of all time.

The first wide-release studio film with a homosexual relationship at its center (and for decades, the last). Making Love follows Michael Ontkean’s Zack, who is married to Claire (Kate Jackson) but exploring his homosexuality with Harry Hamlin’s Bart. It’s not a perfect film, but it took a giant risk, and gives us a rare snapshot of Los Angeles‘ gay life in the moment just before AIDS.

Long before his groundbreaking Brokeback Mountain, Ang Lee directed this sweet, comic tale about a Taiwanese immigrant living in New York with his partner. When he offers to marry a Chinese woman so she can obtain a green card, the marriage of convenience spirals out of control when his parents find out and throw a lavish wedding party.

Mike Mills’s sweet 2010 film concerns a Los Angeles artist, played by Ewan MacGregor, building a relationship with his newly-out father (Christopher Plummer) in the last year of the older man’s life. Beginners earned Plummer an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and features a talking Jack Russell terrier. In short, it’s pretty much perfect.

When Megan (Natasha Lyonne) shows more interest in being a vegetarian and female-fronted folk rock, her parents send her away to have her presumed homosexuality cured. Conversion therapy is no joke, but Jamie Babbit’s satire perfectly skewers puritanical homophobia on its head—and it has a joyful, happy ending. (Plus, RuPaul!)

Dee Rees’s gorgeous directorial debut stars Adepero Oduye as Alike, a Brooklyn teenager who comes to terms with her own sexuality and puts the comforts of friends and family at risk as she discovers how to express her identity.

On a scorching August day, Al Pacino’s Sonny attempts to rob a bank in Brooklyn, and…things do not go well. The instant, intense media fame Sonny earns feels more relevant than ever, and things turn surprisingly tender when we learn he plans to use the stolen money for his lover’s gender confirmation surgery.

A Pakistani Brit and his former lover, who has become a fascist street punk, reunite and run a family laundromat. The characters deal with the materialism and anti-immigrant furor of Thatcher’s England—elements that feel just a little bit too relevant at the moment.

Based on the autobiography of gay Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas, Julian Schnabel’s film brought Javier Bardem to the world’s attention and highlighted the cruelty and homophobia of Castro’s Cuba and Reagan’s America

John Cameron Mitchell brings his cult musical about „internationally ignored“ transgender rock star Hedwig to the screen. In this version, Mitchell shows us the backstory he was only able to tell on stage, and introduces us to Michael Pitt’s Tommy Gnosis. The rare rock musical that actually rocks.

Tom Ford’s directorial debut adapts Christopher Isherwood’s novel about an English professor in returning to life a year after the death of his lover. As you would expect from Ford, it is a relentlessly stylish affair, with indelible performances by Colin Firth and Julianne Moore.

Some might find this adaptation of Paul Rudnick’s off-Broadway play to be a little dated with its treatment of the dating scene in early to mid-’90s New York City. But Jeffrey’s strength is found in its comic and playful look at a search for love amid the AIDS crisis, offering the kind of unabashed joy most of its contemporaries were unable to match.

Lisa Cholodenko’s chic directorial debut features a revelatory performance from Ally Sheedy as a prematurely retired photographer, and Radha Mitchell as the young woman who can revitalize her career.

Pedro Almodóvar’s comic melodramas are filled to the brim with delightfully absurd characters, and his Oscar-winning All About My Mother offers some of the best. After the death of her son, Manuela seeks out to find his father—who now goes by the name of Lola. Along for the journey is a young nun (played by Penelope Cruz) who is newly pregnant with Lola’s baby.

A group of London LGBT activists form a coalition with striking Welsh miners in Thatcher’s U.K. Stephen Beresford’s Golden Globe-nominated screenplay underscores the need, as urgent as ever, for oppressed groups to join forces. There is power in a union!

Norman Rene’s film follows a group of gay men through the early years of the AIDS crisis, one day per year, starting on the day the New York Times first covered the story of the „gay cancer.“ A deep meditation on grief, gallows humor, and the families we make with our friends.

What do a recently divorced woman and a middle-aged gay man have in common? They’re both having an affair with a charming and stylish artist—and they’re aware that the lover they share in common isn’t exclusive to them. John Schlesinger’s acclaimed drama depicts two people who seek surprising ways to break free of their dull lives and reclaim their untamed youth.

When her older lover, Orlando, dies suddenly, Marina must put her grief on pause as Orlando’s ex-wife and family immediately shun her because she is transgender. The winner of this year’s Oscar for Best Foreign Language film, Sebastián Lelio’s drama features a stirring lead performance from actress Daniela Vega.

A closeted Northern Englishman prepares to take over his family farm, with some help from a Romanian farmhand whom his father has hired. A heartbreaking depiction of British repression, with a supporting performance from a newborn lamb that will make you vegan for at least an hour. It’s as delicate and beautiful as it is— let’s be honest here—extremely hot.

Spielberg followed up Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom with this adaptation of Alice Walker’s novel. In her film debut, Whoopi Goldberg plays Celie, an African-American woman in the early 20th century, who fights her way through oppression and abuse and finds an unexpected love along the way.

This slice of gay life in mid-’80s Manhattan gave Steve Buscemi his first major film role, and tackled the AIDS crisis in a frank, non-sensational, even humorous manner. Along the way, glimpses of a long-forgotten bohemian New York, Reagan-era Fire Island, and a pre-Drew Carey Show Kathy Kinney

Shot on iPhones along Santa Monica Boulevard’s unofficial red light district, Tangerine follows two transgender sex workers and one lovesick cab driver through a particularly eventful Christmas Eve. Director Sean Baker found his leads—two first-time film actors—at the actual donut shop where much of the movie’s action takes place.

Two drag queens (Hugo Weaving and Guy Pearce) and a transgender woman (Terence Stamp) travel across the barren Australian Outback in a giant pink bus named Priscilla en route to a cabaret gig in Alice Springs. Hilarity ensues as their travels involve misadventure after misadventure, but the trio come together as a family unit as they learn more about each other and their personal lives

This film kept its NC-17 rating for some explicit, passionate sex scenes between leads Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos, but it is at its heart a movie about youth, art, heartbreak, and the thrill of exploring one’s identity.

Who among us hasn’t been hanging out in the late 1700s, waiting on our customary proposal portrait to be finished so that we can find a proper spouse, only to fall for our portrait artist of the same sex? Rats! Fooled by queer impulses again. Portrait of a Lady on Fire is one of the most recent additions to the queer canon, and it already boasts quite a reputation for examining the complex relationship between two women who dared to love in an era when their love was absolutely forbidden.

The first mainstream queer film of the new millennium, Brokeback Mountain ushered its themes into the mainstream. Heath Ledger’s shy Ennis del Mar falls in what he cannot articulate as love with Jake Gyllenhaal’s Jack Twist over a long, lonely winter, and their lives bounce off each other’s for years afterward. Ang Lee and screenwriter Larry McMurtry expand Annie Proulx’s short story into a film without one false moment.

Melissa McCarthy got an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of Lee Israel, a caustic celebrity biographer who turns to literary forgery when her career stalls. Richard E. Grant is wonderful as her co-conspirator, but it’s McCarthy’s attempt at romance with Dolly Wells’ shy bookstore owner that gives the movie its heart.

The greatest, most achingly beautiful gay male romance movie. Timothée Chalamet plays the precocious Elio, a teenager living in Italy who becomes infatuated with an older American student, Oliver (Armie Hammer), who is staying with his family for the summer. What begins as a contentious friendship turns into a full-blown love affair as the two young men spend their idle summer days in the lush Mediterranean locale, bracing themselves for an inevitable heartbreak.

If any film can be credited with kicking off our cultural conversation on gender, this is it. Hilary Swank’s breakthrough performance anchors Kimberly Peirce’s film about the murder of Nesbraskan trans man Brandon Teena. Boys Don’t Cry was originally given an NC-17 for even addressing trans issues, but was later downgraded to an R.

Mike Nichols’s American remake of La Cage aux Folles features Robin Williams as a gay nightclub owner whose son announces his engagement to the daughter of an ultra-conservative politician. In typical farce style, his partner (Nathan Lane)—the star of his club’s drag show—poses as his dowdy wife in order to convince his son’s future in-laws that they’re a wholesome American family.

Set in the early ’90s, this energetic and emotional drama follows a group of activists in Paris fighting the government and its slow-moving efforts to battle the HIV/AIDS epidemic. While highlighting the dramatic and powerful work from ACT UP, the film also depicts the personal stories of those fighting for their lives, delivering a human and urgent remembrance of the plague that afflicted millions across the globe—and continues on today.

Todd Haynes brings Patricia Highsmith’s cult novel to the big screen in this lush and seductive film following a young shopgirl named Therese (Rooney Mara) who finds herself charmed by an alluring older woman named Carol (Cate Blanchett). The two set out on a road trip on which they consummate an unspoken passion for each other—one that ultimately brings ruin to Carol’s marriage and awakens dark desires within Therese.

Tom Hanks won his first Oscar for his performance as Andrew Beckett, a successful lawyer who is fired from his firm once the senior partners discover he has AIDS. Jonathan Demme’s searing drama was the first mainstream film to tackle the AIDS crisis, and it gave a familiar face and voice to a marginalized community often ignored by their neighbors and left to suffer because of an intolerant society.

Based on the play by Mart Crawley, and released less than a year after the Stonewall riots, The Boys in the Band perfectly depicts the complex experience of being a gay man at the time—at times joyful, often times confusing, painful, and informed by self-loathing. This comedy still manages to balance the bite and the tenderness for its collection of characters, with its group of young gay men in New York City falling in and out of love (and friendship), and unknowingly on the brink of a cultural revolution.

The only film on this list to earn an Oscar for Best Picture—and deservedly so. Barry Jenkins explores masculinity and repression in his study of Chiron, a young man coming of age in Miami (and played by three different actors at various stages of his life) who grapples with his sexual identity amid his troubled relationship with his crack-addicted mother. Chiron longs to break free of the predetermined path set out for himself by his environment, a journey set into motion by encounter with one of his male peers

The 50 Best LGBTQ Movies Ever Made

Best LGBT films of all time

You’ll say that the title is a little extravagant but that was the point. In fact, my idea was to make a list with good films. Some LGBT films have no interest except the one of talking of LGBT people but some LGBT films are little treasures, here they are

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Best LGBT films of all time

Top 20 gay vacation spots in the world

When it comes to vacations, we’re all for rest and relaxation, but sometimes you just want to get out there and live your best gay life – am I right?

If you’re looking for somewhere gay, gayer, gayest for your next trip, we’ve got you covered. These are our twenty favourite gay travel destinations for many reasons, but primarily because of the welcoming locals, fabulous nightlife and some of the best parties and Pride festivals to bless this good gay universe.

As our readers will know, in our line of work, we’ve been lucky enough to trot all over the globe, seen some incredible places and, for the most part, had a gay old time doing it. This list of the best gay vacation hotspots covers locations in the United States, Europe, Asia and Australia. So wherever in the world you’re based, at least a few of these fantastic gay destinations should be within your grasp. On that note, be sure to check out our guides to the gayest destinations in Europe as well as our guide to the top gay travel destinations for the best gaycation inspiration.

Of course, this is all subjective, and everyone has different tastes – after all, one man’s heaven is another man’s Hades. This is simply our personal POV based on our first-hand experience of visiting many of the world’s most popular gay hotspots. But all the gay places on this list are popular with our community for very good reason.

These Are the 18 Best LGBTQ Movies You Can Stream on Netflix Right Now

From powerful documentaries to touching rom coms, the catalog of LGBTQ-centric films isn’t so narrow anymore.

Let’s be honest: LGBTQ+ representation in movies hasn’t always been exactly up to par. For so long, good queer cinema was virtually non-existent or played into tired, tokenizing tropes. Even with that in mind, most mainstream cinema has centered on heteronormative storylines for decades.

However, where such criticisms once arose from a near-barren canon, LGBTQ+ cinema has become widespread enough to bear some award-winning, prestige films. Sure, the scarcity still has you scavenging through some painful storylines from time to time, but with all that digging eventually comes gold. Luckily for you, when it comes to Netflix, we’ve done most of the digging for you.

The beauty of LGBTQ+ representation in film is that, just like the members of its community, there is no “one-size-fits-all” story. This means it’s not just about LGBTQ+ trauma anymore: there are comedies, compelling dramas, adventures, and a few documentaries scattered in, too. Here are the best LGBTQ+ films on Netflix.

Move over A League of Their Own: One All-American Girls Professional Baseball League player and her partner have love of their own not yet portrayed on-screen. Directed by the great-nephew of Terry Donahue and Pat Henschel, A Secret Love uncovers the two women’s romantic relationship, spanning across decades of secrecy.

A perfect addition to any Baby Gay™’s coming-of-age canon, The Half Of It tells the tender story of Elie, a bookish high schooler who finds herself in an unlikely love triangle when a jock recruits her help in courting Aster, her own crush. Directed by Alice Wu and starring an Asian-American lead, the film displays some much-needed representation in young adult-oriented queer cinema.

This heartwarming Bollywood romantic comedy-drama tells the story of Sweety, a young Punjabi woman and closeted lesbian, on her quest for acceptance from her family. In love with another woman but pressured by her family to marry a man, Sweety finds her fate ironically saved by a potential suitor who assists her coming-out by crafting a romantic play about the two women.

Circus of Books is a documentary about the West Hollywood bookstore of the same name that became the largest U.S. distributor of gay porn in the 1980s, including its history as a queer social club, and the husband and wife owners who stayed library-hush through it all. A textbook example of allyship, pun intended.

A teenaged boy named Song finds himself in a twisted triangle when it is revealed that his late father’s primary insurance beneficiary is his secret male lover. As Song finds his allegiance caught between the two battling widow and widower, his mother struggles with her grief and possession, determined not to lose another loved one’s favor to the elusive man.

Moonlight is hard to sum up into a sentence. It’s better described as a list of words: breathtaking, visceral, touching, devastating. The story of a young black gay man growing was handily the most powerful film of 2016 (sorry La La Land), and it’s one of those Best Picture winners whose gravitas only continues to swell with time.

There is a truth about a lot of LGBTQ movies being a bit of a tragedy fest, and make no mistake—Philadelphia is a heartbreaker. But the Tom Hanks film is so much more than another AIDS-tale that ends in tragedy. It’s possibly the most powerful performance Hanks has ever given, and it sheds an incredibly important light on an epidemic that the American government largely turned a blind eye to.

A gay man (Jesse Plemons) returns home to his conservative family to be with his cancer-stricken mom (Molly Shannon) in this sweetly comic semi-autobiographical film written and directed by Chris Kelly.

A lot of people have heard about Marsha P. Johnson… particularly as the rumored thrower of the first brick at Stonewall. But few people know the story of her death and how many believe it was unfairly ruled a suicide. A pillar of the LGBTQ community, The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson is simply required viewing. And that’s not a cliché in this case.

The Perfection is one of those bizarro films that isn’t particularly the best-made feature, but damn if it isn’t a lot of fun to watch. Starring Allison Williams and Logan Browning, this queer horror film is all about psychological manipulation and a bit of campiness. Always worth it for that, if nothing else.

This film won Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto Oscars at the 2014 Academy Awards. But even more than being Oscar bait, it tells the important story of real-life mid-1980s electrician Ron Woodroof, who is diagnosed with AIDS and given 30 days to live. He smuggles unapproved therapies and drugs into the U.S., and with a fellow AIDS patient (Leto), he sells those treatments to other people in need of them.

This starts out like any other teen movie: high schooler Alex Truelove (Daniel Doheny) wants to lose his virginity to his girlfriend. But this one has a twist. He ends up meeting Elliot (Antonio Marziale) and falling for him. Fear not though—this still has all the teen movie maxims: a little angst, cute moments, and exploration of sexuality.

This movie, from Spanish director Isabel Coixet, is about the first same-sex marraige in Spain. The harrowing true story follows Elisa Sanchez Loriga, who took on the identity of Mario Sánchez so she could marry her partner, Marcela Gracia Ibeas. This marriage, which took place on June 8, 1901, was later discovered, but the Catholic church never ended up denouncing the union. The couple did, however, spend the rest of their life running from persecution.

This documentary tells the story of lesbian comedian Tig Notaro, who turns a breast cancer diagnosis into a powerful comedy set. The smart comic’s journey is as hysterical as it is touching, and man if it doesn’t serve a lot of both.

No, this is not the 2015 Will Smith movie about the forensic pathologist who discovers a neurological deterioration among former NFL players. This one, which requires you to search “concussion movie lesbian” in order to find the plot, is about a lesbian who gets hit in the head with a baseball, gets a concussion, and decides she needs a more sexually adventurous life than the one she has with her wife.

In this Tom Ford film, Colin Firth plays George Falconer, an English professor in Los Angeles in 1962. He is grieving the death of his partner, Jim, but Jim’s family won’t acknowledge him. George decides to end his life, but as he prepares to do so, he comes across several significant people from his past who might just convince him that there’s more to live for.

Two teenage girls fall in (and out) of love in this sexy and intense coming-of-age drama that picked up the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival—and will put you through the emotional ringer.

Director Miguel Arteta co-wrote the screenplay for this comedy with Alia Shawkat, who stars as one half of a couple (alongside Laia Costa) that meets at a club and discovers intimacy through frequent sex.

The best gay sex positions: How do gay men have sex?

As anyone who’s ever had gay sex, thought about gay sex or watched gay sex will know there are endless combinations possible gay sex positions. But where to start? What feels best? How do you gay men have sex?

This guide to the four most accessible – and we reckon most pleasurable – gay sex positions will help get you started.

Before we get stuck into how to stick it in, we’d always condone safer sex and recommend you read our guide to PrEP, and always use condoms when having sex.

18 very gay and very good books you should read this Pride Month

Pride Month is officially here and that can only mean one thing: time to load up your reading list with stellar queer stories.

Of course, you should be mixing gay books into your to-be-read pile no matter what time of year, but this month, as you celebrate Pride, queer books can be the perfect way to explore the breadth and diversity of the LGBTQ community.

Fortunately for anybody looking for a great gay read, the book world is filled with a bevy of queer stories of all genres.

Whether you’re looking for a meditative poetry collection about queer identity and mental health, a deep dive into the New York City’s ballroom culture in the ’80s and ’90s, a comic about a group scouts who find themselves plagued by supernatural creatures at camp, or a coming-of-age story about a shapeshifter who is navigating life and dating, there is a queer book out there for you.

Here are 18 very gay and very good books you should read this Pride Month.

You’ve never read a coming-of-age story like this. Paul Takes The Form of a Mortal Girl details the adventures of Paul Polydoris, a student in Iowa City who studies queer theory. Oh, and did we mention that Paul is a shapeshifter who can change from Paul to Polly at will. On the surface, it’s an absurd sci-fi premise, but Lawlor uses it to deftly explore gender, identity, and the way we form relationships with other people as well as with ourselves. 

Joseph Cassara’s The House of Impossible Beauties takes a deep dive into New York City’s ballroom culture in the ’80s and ’90s by following a group of characters, each who enter the scene for a different reason. But what stands out about the book isn’t just the novel’s vivid portrait of the past, but also Cassara’s breathtaking and unforgettable characters who are all trying to find their way.

Andrew Greer’s 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Less starts off with a character in crisis: our protagonist Arthur is a struggling novelist, feeling existential as he approaches his 50th birthday, and, to make matters worse, he’s just received an invitation to his ex-boyfriend’s wedding. Instead of despairing, Arthur says „NOPE“ and instead embarks on a haphazard literary world tour. But what sells the book is Greer’s resounding heart and humor, making this tale of romantic misadventures as funny as it is earnest.

Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit follows Joanna „Jo“ Gordon, an out teen who is suddenly pushed back into the closet when her evangelical father remarries, moves their family from Atlanta to Rome, Georgia, and asks Jo to hide her queer identity for her senior year. The only problem is Mary Carlson, the sister of Jo’s new friend in Rome, who Jo is falling for. The result is a heartfelt novel about coming out and discovering young love. Also, shout out to the infinitely charming title of this book!

You’ve probably seen explores feels universal and extremely relatable.

Under the Udala Trees is a book about star-crossed love. The novel follows the life of Ijeoma, a young girl who, at the start of the book, is sent away from her family in order to stay safe during the Nigerian civil war. While away, Ijeoma meets Amina, another girl also separated from her family. The two begin a brief relationship… only to find out that their love is forbidden. What follows is a beautiful novel about love and hardship as Ijeoma is sent home, forced into an unhappy marriage with a man, all the while grappling with her attraction to women.

Don’t forget to add a bit of poetry to your reading list this Pride Month! If you’re looking for a collection to start with, check out sam sax’s collection madness. The poems in this collection cover everything from sexuality to mental health to culture and heritage, but what shines through and connects each of these threads is sax’s incredibly thoughtful and evocative prose.

If there is a hidden gem of queer lit, it’s ReleaseMrs. Dalloway somehow feels nostalgic and charming as Patrick Ness outlines one teen’s struggle to define himself.

If the Babadook has taught us anything, it’s that Pride is not complete without a little noir. To that end, if you are looking for a darker read this month, make sure you check out Caleb Roehrig’s Last Seen Leaving. The book is a coming out story masked as a mystery thriller about Flynn, the primary suspect in an investigation when his girlfriend January disappears. Flynn’s answers about his life with January don’t quite add up… but maybe that has less to do about January and more about the secret that Flynn is keeping.

Nevada offers a thoughtful look at identity and the trans experience.

Noelle Stevenson, Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, and Brooke A. Allen

If you’re looking for some comics to check out this Pride month, be sure to check out Lumberjanes the perfect Pride Month read. 

Fun Home is a graphic memoir about coming out and finding love, centered around two people. The book documents Alison Bechdel (who also came up with the Bechdel test), her experience exploring her attraction to women, and the way that her father resisted her identity. But, after Alison’s father is hit by a car and killed, she reflects on his past and realizes that he may have had his own struggles with his sexual identity.

To read Alexander Chee’s essay collection How To Write An Autobiographical Novel is to stand in a hall of mirrors, watching as a single person, and all of the identites that compose them, is reflected from all angles. The essay collection is a deep dive into Chee’s past as he documents his expereinces as a gay rights and HIV/AIDS activist, a rose gardener, a writer, and more. But at the core, the book explores how we use writing to shape who we are and how who we are shapes our writing.

As the title probably suggests, They Both Die At The End is not what we could a „happy“ book. The novel follows a day in the life of two boys, Mateo and Rufus, who get early morning calls from Death-Cast telling them that today is the day that they’re going to die. Though initially strangers, Mateo and Rufus are soon brought together through the Last Friend app, a social network that connects people on their last day alive. But as Mateo and Rufus embark on a quest to check items off their bucket list while they still have time, their friendship grows into something more, ultimately exploring what happens when we fall in love with someone we know we only will have a very limited time with.

Sometimes all you need is a good friend. And that’s where You Know Me Well reveals how our friends can become our greatest lifeline.

The Argonauts  radiates with stunning observations about being queer and in love, making the memoir feel less like a book and more like the perfect rendering of a person’s heart on a page.

Fair warning up front: Don’t Call Us Dead is a devastating poetry collection. But this book is as beautiful as it is painfully raw. Throughout the collection, Smith writes about race, queer identity, and AIDS, with an electrifying amount of passion and care, making this book a must-read for Pride Month.

You may know Becky Albertalli for her novel Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda  reveals that Leah is struggling with her identity too: she’s bisexual and working to muster the courage to come out to her friends. But as Leah navigates her senior year of high school, she realizes that she may love one her friends more than anyone else might expect.

1. Fire Island Pines gay beach in New York, USA

Fire Island is a thin sliver of land running parallel to the south shore of Long Island in New York. It’s a serious gay mecca on the east coast, where the Manhattan gay boys come to party during summer. The main gay areas are predominantly located around Cherry Grove (or “the Grove” for short) and Fire Island Pines (aka “the Pines”). The beaches around here are gay as hell.

The Grove and the Pines have been gay havens since the 1960s and have largely been left alone as self-governing communities. This has allowed an “anything goes” attitude to flourish here, which makes for some wild fun as well as some of the skimpiest swimsuits we’ve ever seen! Spots such as Pavilion are ideal for drinks in the sun before moving on to more hedonistic establishments such as Sip n Twirl.

Our favorite spot is located on the wild stretch of beach between the Grove and the Pines, separated by a large forest. As you enter the forest between the two communities, continue heading towards the beach ahead and there you’ll find it. The total walk from either the Grove or the Pines ferry dock is around half a mile. Check out why we also rate Fire Island as one of the best vacation spots in the US.

How to get to the gay beach of Fire Island: The most convenient way to reach Fire Island from New York is by car but keep in mind that you’ll need to pay for the parking as you cannot use your car on Fire Island. Otherwise, you can take the train then the ferry. For more info on directions, timetables and different means of transports, check out this page.

2. Hilton gay beach in Tel Aviv, Israel

This sandy beach in central Tel Aviv is the de-facto epicentre of the city’s gay scene: this is also where the massive Tel Aviv Pride festival takes place every June. There are plenty of bars and cafes around Hilton Beach serving refreshing cocktails and snacks. We particularly loved Hilton Bay, which is a chic place to enjoy a drink right there on the sand. 

With calm, clean Mediterranean waters, Hilton Beach is an ideal spot to make like the locals and try your hand at Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP), which is something of a tradition in this super-sporty city.

For those who are not so athletically minded, grabbing a cocktail at one of the many terrace bars here is a rite of passage at Hilton Beach. Bring your sunglasses, your eyes will be darting every way as you try to keep track of all of the muscled men that patrol this section of the beach wearing only the tightest of trunks!

How to get to the Hilton gay beach of Tel Aviv: the gay beach is located in a prime area of Tel Aviv. Take the 55 bus to the stop HaYarkon/Arlozorov – you can’t miss the Hilton Hotel, which stands opposite the stop. Then, the beach sits right in front of the hotel. Remember, the central part of the beach is the main gay area, with the north more for a dog walking scene and the south the preserve of local surfers.

3. Mar Bella gay beach in Barcelona, Spain

Truly a gay beach like no other, Barcelona’s Mar Bella benefits from a location that is both secluded and close to the city center. Cozy, intimate yet not without its fair share of glamor, the gay beach of Mar Bella offers visitors the best of both worlds.

Right there on the beach is the BeGay bar-restaurant, which during summer stays open from early in the morning until, well, early in the morning! Serving great food and delicious cocktails, it’s easy to while away hour after hour sitting on the bar’s vibrant terrace area, chatting with the cosmopolitan crowd that gathers here. 

For extra supplies, like sun lotion or shades, there are a few small supermarkets just 10 minutes up the road from Mar Bella, as well as endless options for food and drink.

This beach famously hosts the epic every August, which is one of the main annual gay events in Barcelona. Though it does make finding a spot to sunbathe a real pain, which is why it’s important to go there early if you’re there in the peak summer months.

How to get to the Mar Bella gay beach of Barcelona: To reach Mar Bella hop on the metro to Poblenou. From there it’s a 10-minute walk down to the sea. Mar Bella attracts a mixed crowd of all ages including both locals and foreigners. We spotted guys throwing beach balls, playing music, and chilling out under the sun.

4. Miami 12th Street gay beach, Florida, USA

Miami’s South Beach is world-renowned as a hotbed of glitz, glamor and beautiful people. Nowhere is this more true than at the city’s 12th Street beach, where gay Miami really comes to the fore. 

This is where America’s most unapologetically flamboyant come to strut their stuff and have fun. We found the 12th Street beach to host some of the most gorgeous guys we have seen anywhere in Miami, which really is saying something!

One of the best things about 12th Street beach is that it is located in one of Miami’s most exciting parks: Lummus Park. This sprawling green space is filled with volleyball courts, outdoor gyms, and more, meaning you’ll have no shortage of activities to enjoy on and around the beach.

This gay hotspot in Miami is home to the annual Winter Party Festival, the Circuit Party and the Miami Beach Pride. If you’re not planning to visit for one of these events, not to worry, as 12th Street beach is close to all manner of top bars and restaurants including the famous Palace Bar which sits just a couple of blocks away.

How to get to the 12th Street gay beach of Miami: The clue’s in the name – head over to the coastal end of 12th Street, past the intersection with the famous Ocean Drive street and voila! If you’re driving, park up at the city garage located nearby at the intersection of 13th Street and Collins. 

5. Bondi gay beach in Sydney, Australia

When you think of Sydney beaches, you probably think of hot Aussie surfers, lifeguards, and endless nights of partying. Well, that’s exactly what Bondi Beach has to offer for gay travelers looking to enjoy Australia’s most famous stretch of sand.

The de-facto gay area of the beach is north Bondi, where the speedos are tighter and the abs more chiseled than in any other zone. North Bondi even has its own LGBTQ lifeguard force numbering over a thousand! If you’re lucky enough to be in town for Sydney Gay Mardi Gras in March, you’ll see north Bondi transformed into a zone of wild partying that goes on well into the early hours of the morning.

On that note, it’s worth remembering that drinks are banned on Bondi beach and that this rule is strictly enforced by local authorities. Luckily, the boardwalk area directly behind the beach is packed with cool bars, cafes, and restaurants serving everything from cold beers to deliciously fruity cocktails and ice-cold Aussie white wines.

How to get to the Bondi gay beach of Sydney: You can go either by train/bus or bus all the way. By train head to Bondi Junction and then either walk the final 2 km to the beach or take a short bus ride. By bus from downtown Sydney, jump on the #380 which will take you directly to Bondi beach. Driving is not recommended because of parking limitations at the beach. 

6. Atlantic Beach in Condado, Puerto Rico, USA

With a strong gay scene made up of both locals and tourists, San Juan is home to a string of gay beaches, with the best of all located at Condado.

The gay area of Condado sits in front of the Atlantic Hotel, whose bar is a hub for gay men looking to sip cocktails and mingle in the sun. The Happy Hour here is legendary, taking place daily from 5-9 pm when mixer drinks can be enjoyed for as little as $4 each, with cocktails only slightly pricier. If you’re the kind of guy that seeks nothing more than sun, sea, and cheap drinks, then this is the place for you!

Alternatively, you can rent a sun lounger and enjoy being waited on hand and foot right there on the sand as you watch the boys pass by. Atlantic Beach is home to the kind of relaxed, carefree attitude that means you’re sure to meet plenty of fun, interesting folks during your time here. It is no wonder why we rate Puerto Rico as one of the !

How to get to the Condado gay beach of Puerto Rico: the easiest way to reach Condado beach is by Uber, which takes around 10 minutes from downtown San Juan. Tip: be sure to tell the driver you want to be dropped at the Atlantic Beach area in the center of Condado, which sprawls for some way in either direction.

7. Black’s gay beach in San Diego, California, USA

A gorgeously secluded section of Torrey Pines State Beach, Black’s Beach is perhaps the most famous nudist beach in the United States. This enormous stretch of sand is home to a sizeable gay area at the north end of the beach, where you will find gay surfers, beach bums and straight-up posers quite literally rubbing shoulders.

When we say that Black’s Beach is long we mean really, really long, two and a half miles to be precise. As such, you’re sure to feel the immense sense of freedom and seclusion that Black’s has to offer whether you’re here to surf, sunbathe, or just run around in your birthday suit!

As one of the premier surf destinations on the West Coast, Black’s Beach is a prime spot for meeting and at the very least eyeing-up the scores of beautiful surfer boys that flock here every day of the week. If that doesn’t do it for you, keep an eye out for the schools of dolphins that call this stretch of the coastline home, they’re known to get extremely close to the shore.

How to get to the Black’s gay beach of San Diego: simply put the destination “Torrey Pines Glider Port” in your GPS and follow the directions. Once you arrive, continue through the driveway. There is a parking lot where the path ends – you’ll know you’ve reached it when you spot the ‘Danger’ signs.

8. Maspalomas Kiosk #7 gay beach in Gran Canaria, Spain

Gran Canaria is one of the Canary Islands in Spain, located just off the coast of West Africa. The island is a gay haven with a massive gay scene around the Yumbo Centre in Playa del Ingles. Just south of this is the gay beach of Maspalomas close to kiosk #7, which sits hidden by the island’s famous sand dunes.

The beach itself is a lot of fun, with sun loungers available for rent and guys of all ages enjoying themselves. Mainly, the gay beach attracts tourists from North Europe on their gay vacation in Gran Canaria. 

The only downside about the Maspalomas gay beach is that when it gets windy here, the sand goes EVERYWHERE! So be prepared for this or avoid going on a very windy day. Gran Canaria has tons of gay accommodations to choose from and to suit all budgets, you won’t be disappointed!

How to get to the gay beach of Maspalomas: Head over to the Hotel Riu Palace Maspalomas and from there cross through the Sand Dunes following the path marked with wooden posts. The walk through the sand dunes is around 15 minutes.

9. Herring Cove gay beach in Provincetown, Massachusetts, USA

Herring Cove is a part of the wider Cape Cod National Seashore, a stunning national park located in the northeast United States. This is the most popular gay beach in Provincetown as well as being an unofficial spot for nudists – though be aware that nudism is technically illegal here. The authorities just turn a blind eye to it…!

The dunes just behind the beach are a hotspot for cruising and a bit of rumpy-pumpy, so it’s worth being careful where you tread! Herring Cove attracts a diverse gay and lesbian crowd that can stick around until very late indeed during hot summer nights when the atmosphere gets downright hedonistic.

How to get to the Herring Cove gay beach of Provincetown: Take the beach shuttle from downtown Provincetown. If you’re driving, head south out of town just a couple of miles and follow the signposts. You will be able to park up right there in front of the dunes.

10. Elia gay beach in Mykonos, Greece

Elia Beach is our favorite gay beach on Mykonos Island in Greece.

It has a super cool gay section – lookout for the rainbow flags waving in the wind. The water is warm, the sand soft and the facilities exceptional. The beach is generally very quiet in the morning, so if you’re just looking for a place to relax, then use this time to do it! Things start to get a little bit more active in the afternoon with tons of gorgeous gay men descending onto the beach for a day of socializing, partying, and swimming.

The busiest period is during the XLSIOR gay festival which takes place at the end of August and early September. Read more about it in our . 

How to get to the Elia gay beach of Mykonos: Elia beach is located 6.2 miles (10km) south from Mykonos Town at the southern tip of the island. The best way to reach it is to drive down in your rental car or buggy. There is a public bus but it runs on limited hours and take ages! Sometimes scheduled boat services can take you here during the peak summer seasons.

11. Sandy Bay gay beach in Cape Town, South Africa

Sandy Bay Beach is renowned as the best gay beach in South Africa, and we wholeheartedly agree! 

This beach is quite secluded from the rest of Cape Town and as such, it can be rather difficult to reach. Tucked away beside a hidden road half-way between Cape Town and Cape Point, Sandy Bay doesn’t like to make its presence known too loudly. Yet, if we’re being honest, this only adds to the mysterious charm and tranquil vibe that this place has in bucketloads.

12. Sebastian Street gay beach in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

Sebastian Street Beach is one of America’s best-known gay beaches for a reason. That is – it’s absolutely awesome! Whether you come for the sun, the warm water or the eye-candy, Sebastian Street is a must-visit for gay guys in the Fort Lauderdale area.

The vibe is quite low-key at this LGBTQ hotspot, with refreshingly little posing going on. Not that we’re against posing, it’s just that there’s a time and a place – we’re looking at you, Miami! In Fort Lauderdale, the pouts turn to easy-going smiles…you’re sure to find the crowd here friendly, open and accessible in comparison. 

The nightlife around Sebastian Street gay beach is more dinner and cocktails than wild, endless beach parties. Again, if that’s what you want, head to nearby Miami or sashay over to the for one of the best gay nights out of your life! In terms of gay accommodation, there are plenty of excellent with some of them close to Sebastian Street Beach.

How to get to the Sebastian Street gay beach of Fort Lauderdale: The best way to get around anywhere in Fort Lauderdale is by Uber or Lyft. Otherwise, you can reach it by public transport by jumping on bus number #11 or #40 from downtown, which will drop you right there by the sand.

13. Will Rogers State gay beach in Santa Monica, California, USA

Situated in the gay mecca of Santa Monica, Will Rogers State Beach is one of California’s most fabulous places to be. After all, as Katy Perry once said, “California is fine, fresh, and fierce!”

This is one of the best gay beaches in the US, located near lifeguard tower 18 in Pacific Palisades on the Santa Monica Bay. Will Rogers is fondly nicknamed “Ginger Rogers Beach” and it is famous for being the filming location of Baywatch before it was moved to Hawaii. Need we go on?!

The beach is well maintained, so it’s always very clean, whilst the crowd here tends to be extremely laid back, which of course is true of much of the West Coast. In what is a famous surfing spot in the region, you can hit those waves in between games of volleyball or gymnastics. Everywhere you look there is a hive of activity going on, with people just embracing the bodies they were born, in the most shame-free and California fashion.

Nearby you can enjoy a bike or hiking trail, which meanders right across the beach and around the coastline. Close by is a totally lush gay bar called “The Birdcage” – yes, just like the movie. The bar throws a Beach Club party every weekend with great music, drinks, and no shortage of fun.

How to get to the Will Rogers State gay beach of Santa Monica: The best (and only!) way to reach it is by car, bound for Pacific Palisades on the Santa Monica Bay. When you arrive, look out for the rainbow painted lifeguard tower #18.

14. Playa de los Muertos gay beach in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Translating quite literally as “Daed Man’s Beach”, Playa de Los Muertos is ironically one of Mexico’s most vibrant, life-filled beaches that has become a hive of LGBTQ activity.

This is a true downtown beach, located just off the main seafront drag in , a beautiful town and a key part of Mexican tourism. As such, the party never stops at Playa de Los Muertos! Grab a tropical cocktail (Piña Colada, anyone?) at literally any time of day, settle down in a lounge chair and watch the whole carnival-like situation unfold before your very eyes.

Whether it’s speedo-clad gay guys showing off their chiseled abs or local traders selling everything from fresh fruit to handicrafts, Playa de Los Muertos offers a true feast for the eyes. With beautiful white sand, crystal clear waters, and a glut of trendy bars, this awesome gay beach has everything you need to spend a few days getting lost in the festival atmosphere.

How to get to Playa de Los Muertos gay beach of Puerto Vallarta: From Zona Romantica, either grab a taxi over, or jump on the Centro Bus and get off at the Playa Los Arcos Hotel, which is 2/3 blocks away from the gay beach.

15. Farme Ipanema gay beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Not only is the beach of Ipanema a big part of the LGBTQ scene in Rio, but there is an entire district of the same name that has become a gay hub in its own right.

Let’s face it though, you came to Rio for the beaches and this one does not disappoint. Situated toward the eastern end of Ipanema between ‘Postos’ 9 and 8, this fabulously gay-friendly area is filled with queens both local and foreign. In fact, in Rio, they use the term ‘Barbies’ to describe musclemen! This particular stretch of beach is packed with Barbie Boys in all their tanned, skimpy-shorted glory!

There are always plenty of games happening – even if you’re not that into sports, the crowds here are so inviting and engaging that you’ll feel yourself becoming the next Sporty Spice within minutes! Try your hand at surfing, the waves here are to di…ve for, and the blue waters feel so relaxing underneath the piping hot sun.

How to get to the Farme gay beach of Ipanema in Rio: Jump on to the metro line #1 or #4 and take it to the General Osório stop. From there it’s a 5-minute walk down to the sand. You’ll know you’re in the right place when you spot all the rainbow flags.

16. Poodle gay beach in Rehoboth, Delaware, USA

Part of the wider Rehoboth Beach area, Poodle Beach is Delaware’s gayest patch of sand and a hub for the area’s vibrant LGBTQ scene. Located at the southern end of the Rehoboth Boardwalk, the gay section of the beach is unmissable due to the rainbow parasols and throngs of guys who come in every conceivable shape and size.

Poodle Beach is known to have some of the cleanest water of any beach in America, making this a hotspot for swimming and watersports. If you would rather kick back on the sand and work on that tan, there are plenty of bars and cafes nearby to grab an ice-cold cocktail or beer from. 

The crowd here is incredibly friendly and open, with none of the pretentiousness that blights many other gay beaches in the world. As long as you turn up with a smile and the cutest bathing suit you can find, you’re sure to make plenty of new friends at Poodle Beach.

How to get to gay Poodle Beach of Rehoboth, Delaware: Drive over to Rehoboth Beach and keep heading south on the Rehoboth Boardwalk until you spot the gays and the rainbows!

17. Praia #19 gay beach in Lisbon, Portugal

Renowned through the city as a popular nudist beach, ‘Praia 19’ as it is known locally, is one of the largest and best gay beaches in Europe. It is situated just across the River Tagus from downtown Lisbon, part of the wider Costa da Caparica coastline.

Praia 19 will blow you away on arrival, the sheer scope of this beach is enormous. The huge waves of the Atlantic ocean, are truly a sight to behold. Yet it’s not just the natural scenery here that’s amazing. Praia 19 is known for anything-goes-hanky-panky in the dunes and forest area just behind the sand. You will find all kinds of gay boys enjoying themselves at this enormous beach, with both locals and gay tourists frequenting it.

18. Bassa Rodona gay beach in Sitges, Spain

Platja de la Bassa Rodona is the main official beach of Sitges, with rainbow flags proudly flying in the wind.

Sitges is one of the best gay resort towns we’ve ever been to. Located around 27.3 miles (44km) south from Barcelona, this has to be one of our favorite gay destinations on the planet. Throughout the town, you will see the rainbow flag flying proudly outside windows, bars, and restaurants. We rate it as one of the gayest cities in Europe!

Platja de la Bassa Rodona sits in front of the town and is one of many beaches in Sitges. Undoubtedly though, this is the most popular gay area and it’s here that you will find the buffest guys in the skimpiest swimsuits. The water is warm, clean, and perfect for swimming, just be sure to get here early during summer as it can get really packed.

Owing to it being so close to town, Platja de la Bassa Rodona is backed by many bars, cafes, and restaurants, many of which are gay owned. We particularly love Picnic, which offers delicious snacks and cocktails that are perfect to take away and enjoy right there on the beach.

How to get to the Bassa Rodona gay beach of Sitges: the gay beach is super easy to reach. From Sitges train station, just head south, through Sitges main town, cross over the promenade and voila – spot the rainbows!

19. Little Beach in Hawaii, USA

Little Beach is located in the gorgeous Makena State Park of Maui and is one of the island’s most popular nudist spots. Officially named Puʻu Olai, you will be able to fulfill all of your tropical fantasies at this stunning, paradise beach.

The gay area of Little Beach tends to be at the far end, where you will find all types of queens frolicking on the crystal-clear waters and sunning themselves on the sand. Be sure to bring plenty of supplies to this remote beach as there are certainly no swanky cafes here. Also, be careful in the water because the currents can be quite unpredictable and get strong without any warning.

How to get to the Little Beach gay beach of Hawaii: Little Beach can be tough to get to and rewards only the most adventurous minds. First of all, enter the Maui Prince Hotel on your GPS. Once you arrive here keep driving until the sign for Makena State Park when you will want to turn right. Leave the car in the nearby parking lot before walking down to Big Beach. Turn right and head all the way to the volcanic rocks at the end, hike over these and you will see the most beautiful little bay ever. This is Little Beach!

20. Cavallet gay beach in Ibiza, Spain

Just like the Venga Boys said, “We’re going to Ibiza”. And we sure love it on this Spanish party island!

Ibiza is synonymous with mega-clubs, some of the best we’ve ever been to. However, it’s not all about partying here. Ibiza also has some stunning beaches to check out including one just for us called Platja Es Cavallet, located in the south of the island.

Cavallet beach is a super chilled place to hang out during the day after a night out partying in one of the island’s mega clubs. This was also the first gay beach we ever went to together as a young gay couple, many, many moons ago. We remember standing behind the dunes, peeking out onto the horizon where Seb swears he could spy Formentera…

On our visit, it was peak summer period in July, so the beach was packed full of gay guys of all ages from all around the world. It’s also where you will find the club flyer boys hanging around and giving out discounts to that evening’s biggest parties. Yet, despite the crowds, we love that you can always find a quiet spot all to yourself at Cavallet.

How to get to the Cavallet gay beach of Ibiza: you can reach the gay beach either by driving here or via a long bus ride from Ibiza Town, followed by another good 20-minute walk through the forest.

1. Fire Island, New York, USA

Find me a gay man who hasn’t heard of Fire Island – take your time, I’ll wait…

Fire Island is one of those locations that is truly synonymous with gay travel, and all you gay guys who love a good party should experience it at least once. On Fire Island, there is always something going on. Highlights include the Fire Island Pines Party in July, a three-day spectacular of gay shenanigans and live music from world-famous DJs like David Morales.

Fire island is in our opinion the best gay vacation spot in the world.

Bear Weekend takes place in August – the name pretty much says it all! And sure, Fire Island has never been known for an abundance of clothing, but Spartacus in September takes it to a whole other level – much like the TV show of the same name, it’s an odyssey of wall-to-wall man-meat! Fire Island is also home to one of the best gay beaches in the world…so say we!

2. Sitges, Spain

Like Fire Island, there’s a reason everyone has heard about Sitges – because it’s absolutely fabulous, and probably the gayest destination in Spain. Every year, gays flock to this coastal town in their thousands to attend the world-class parties, packed to the rafters with hotties from all over the world.

Gay Pride Sitges takes place over the best part of a week every June and is unmissable for Pride fans. It’s a non-stop extravaganza of fun and frolics with some truly stunning views – and I’m not talking about the blue skies or the Spanish architecture!

For those who like a little more meat on the bone, there’s Bear Week in September. The weather in Spain stays gorgeous throughout the summer season, so pack your best trunks and call it a day! Find out more in our detailed and read why we rate Spain as one of the most gay friendly countries in the world.

3. Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

For your next gay getaway, you could do a lot worse than the established Gay Capital of Florida and, incidentally, the second-gayest place in the US, based on the concentration of gay couples living there. Fort Lauderdale is next-level queer and famous in our community for its sheer number of LGBTQ accommodation providers, all ready to ensure your vacation is as gay as can be!

Wilton Manor is the queer heart, home to the . In terms of annual gay events, look out for the Wilton Manors Stonewall Pride festival in June (2020 being the exception!) and one of the best gay Halloween parties in the world: Wicked Manors! Fort Lauderdale’s main Pride festival takes place in the last week of April, including parties galore and buckets of LGBTQ culture and history from beginning to end. Find out more in our detailed gay travel guide to Fort Lauderdale and also be sure to jump in a cab for a short ride south (around 40 mins) to party in the gay bars of Miami.

4. Provincetown, Massachusetts, USA

From the second-gayest US city to the absolute gayest of all time, Provincetown’s 2011 census revealed that more gay couples live there than any other city in the country – how fabulous!

So, you can be sure a trip to the iconic P-town is going to be a good time packed with positive queer energy. With a rich history steeped in the arts, this small town is often compared to , Mykonos and Sitges, and it’s been a haven for the gays since the 1920s.

The annual Pride festival sees the LGBTQ community launch a full-scale takeover. The spectacle begins with a cruise on the official Pride ferry, followed by shows, shows, shows and parties, parties, parties… Facts are facts, America – it doesn’t get much gayer than P-town!!

5. Tel Aviv, Israel

The Middle East might not be top of everyone’s travel list, but Israel is a notable exception in its queer acceptance. Tel Aviv Pride ensures that the city is firmly on the map of the best gay travel destinations in the world, primarily for its wildly exciting gay nightlife scene. Tel Aviv Pride goes hard for a solid week of LGBTQ events, an experience all gay party people owe to themselves.

Gays in Tel Aviv do not get their kicks by simply going to the bars or beaches – although there’s plenty of them, and they are fabulous! No, the glitterati of Tel Aviv celebrate their queerdom 365 days a year with world-class gay parties taking place every week all over the city.

And don’t get us started on Israel at the annual Eurovision Songcontest! Two words: Dana and Netta!

6. Madrid, Spain

For a great gay vacation, you can’t really go wrong with Spain, but the capital city of Madrid certainly stacks up to Sitges as a perfect location for gay travellers.

A short distance from the main street of Gran Via, you will find Chueca, Madrid’s gay district. You may want to adjust your body clocks – the gay nightlife in Madrid kicks off late, but it’s so worth it! There’s fun for everyone, ranging from regular bars to more “niche” (wink, wink!!) clubs and cruising establishments.

Madrid is also famous in the LGBTQ community for having one of the biggest Pride events in the world and easily THE best one in Europe. Every year (2020 excluded!) crowds of around 2 million flock to the Spanish capital and transform it into the best gay street party we’ve ever experienced!

7. Manhattan, New York, USA

There’s something for everyone in New York, especially Manhattan island: the fashion capital of the world, the birthplace of iconic TV shows like Seex and the City, and home to some of the world’s finest drag queens including Bianca del Rio, Lady Bunny, Bob the Drag Queen and Sasha Velour.

Manhattan is also where the Pride movement began back in 1969, the year of the Stonewall Riots. The gay energy is strong here, reflected in its nightlife scene and annual Pride festival which so beautifully honours Stonewall every June.

isn’t just a party – although it sure is that too! At its core, it’s a vital queer history lesson that tells the powerful and inspiring story of the LGBTQ pioneers who sashayed down these streets so we could live freely today. Truly, New York Pride is the definitive Pride experience.

8. Gran Canaria, Spain

One of the most popular gay tourist destinations in Europe, is heaven for the gay boys. The Yumbo Centre, the epicentre of gay life in the popular Maspalomas area, may look as though it’s stuck in a time warp, but this kitschy concrete jungle is non-stop gay fun.

Gran Canaria doesn’t scrimp when it comes to Pride either. The main Maspalomas Pride takes place in May, with Winter Pride closing out the year in November. It even manages to squeeze in the Bear Carnival in March, which has become one of the most popular bear events in the world.

Whether you want to drink and dance, take in a show or find Mr Right Now, there’s a place for you here. Sparkles Show Bar features top tier drag seven nights a week…Fun fact: RuPaul’s Drag Race UK season one winner The Vivienne left her residency at Sparkles to compete on the show!

9. Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

We absolutely live for Puerto Vallarta, popular with gay ex-pats and, without a doubt, one of the best gay holiday locations in the world. There’s an ever-present air of queer acceptance here, a fabulous gay scene and a hugely popular PV Pride festival – not to mention the delectable local talent.

The old town area of Zona Romantica is where it’s at for gays in Puerto Vallarta, and Playa de los Muertos is one of the best gay beaches in the world. Wherever you choose to hang out, you can be sure there’s something super-gay happening somewhere!

Puerto Vallarta really knows how to party, kicking off with the BeefDip Mexico Bear Festival in January and the Puerto Vallarta Carnival in March, followed by Puerto Vallarta Pride in May and the Thanksgiving White Party in November. Finally, the ever-fabulous Gay New Years’ Eve closes out another year of celebrating the LGBTQ community in style.

10. Barcelona, Spain

We’re back in España once again. It’s no surprise that one of the biggest cities in Spain is fun, fun, FUN from beginning to end and super-welcoming to the LGBTQ community. Barcelona is an absolutely stunning city full of incredible landmarks and beautiful architecture. But that’s quite enough about that – bring on the gayety!

The Barcelona LGBTQ community keeps the good gay times rolling throughout the year, starting with the Snow Gay Weekend in March, followed by the amazing Barcelona Pride in June. Then there’s the Barcelona Circuit Festival in August, the city’s most popular gay event, which includes a humongous pool party at one of the biggest water parks in Europe. What’s that, you say? Over ten thousand men in nothing but swim trunks, you say? Let’s get soaking wet! Read more in our detailed .

11. Berlin, Germany

Berlin is the centre of all things and certainly one of the most open-minded cities on this list. Some of the best can be found in the Schöneberg district with more underground gritty hangouts over in Kreuzberg, Neukölln and Friedrichshain including the infamous superclub – the Berghain! Berlin has something to suit everyone, whatever you’re into, whoever you’re looking to play with, or just for a regular ol’ dancefloor. Berlin is like a bag of Skittles – all the tastes of the rainbow all in one very gorgeous place!

Berlin is also home to some of the most high-profile gay events in Europe, starting with Berlin CSD (Christopher Street Day), the city’s Pride festival, which takes place in late July. Over in September is the European segment of the world-famous Folsom – this is Berlin’s take on San Francisco’s Folsom Street Fair, where the most deliciously devilish gays get dressed up – or rather, dressed down – in their naughty finery!

12. Mykonos, Greece

This next entry on our list of best gay vacation spots is certainly quieter than many of the others, which will suit some gay travellers down to the ground. Gay Mykonos offers a great mix of revelry and relaxation, perfect for visitors who are a bit too tuckered out for a non-stop party.

Mykonos is at its best and busiest in August and September, around the time of the main gay event on the island, XLSIOR. Fitties from around the world come to show out and show off for the entertainment of everyone around them – and may I say, I was most entertained. XLSIOR packs in some of the hottest gay parties you will ever have in your best gay life, so it’s not to be missed!

13. Thailand

When it comes to gay merriment, Thailand has the TP – the total package. For fabulous nightlife, head to the gay bars of Bangkok. If you want an exotic gay beach party getaway, Phuket Island is for you. If you want a secret romantic hideaway, our top pick is Koh Lipe. For rich culture, head up to . And if you want it all, do it all!

The queer community of Bangkok celebrates every Thai New Year in April in the style we’ve become accustomed to – with a huge circuit party full of beautiful and scantily clad boys, of course! G Circuit Songkran takes place over four days in April and is one of Asia’s biggest and brightest gay festivals.

But not to be outdone, Bangkok also celebrates the Gregorian New Year (end of December) with the spectacular White Party, a solid week of themed events culminating in a dazzling New Years’ Eve extravaganza! We love and always look for an excuse to return whenever we can.

14. Puerto Rico, USA

Puerto Rico, baby! When it comes to gayness, Puerto Rico doesn’t do anything by halves. This Caribbean island is where some of RuPaul’s Drag Race’s finest first stepped out on their path to stardom, including Alexis “BAM!” Mateo, Yara Sofia and season 6 fan-favourite April Carrion.

Most of Puerto Rico’s gay frolics go down in the capital city of San Juan, home of the island’s main Pride festival, which usually takes place on the first weekend of June. Circuit gays won’t want to miss the Hydro Caribbean Festival, a sonic tour de force of sparkle and skin that pops off in late July. Finally, the Puerto Rico queer community closes out the year with the wonderful Winter Pride Fest.