Gayageum

kayagŭmkoreanisch가야금), ist eine in der klassischen koreanischen Musik gespielte Wölbbrettzither. Sie repräsentiert an führender Stelle die nationale Musikkultur Koreas.

Die erfunden. Man kann das Instrument bis auf das Jahr 551 n. Chr. zurückverfolgen, als ein Flüchtling aus dem Land Kaya aus Furcht vor Annexion nach Silla floh und dem König das neue Instrument Kayas, eine Gayageum, zum Geschenk machte.

Es gibt zwei traditionelle Typen der jeongak gayageum ist etwa 142 Zentimeter lang und 23 Zentimeter breit und wurde im 19. Jahrhundert für den Sanjo-Stil entwickelt. Die engere Anordnung der Saiten und die kürzere Länge des Instruments erleichtern die schnelleren Passagen des Sanjo. Beide Instrumente haben zwölf seidene Saiten (heute auch Nylonsaiten) und zwölf bewegliche Stege, die wie Füße von Wildgänsen geformt sind.

sechssaitige Geomungo (oben) und zwölfsaitige Jeongak gayageum, 2017

Die Stimmung der 1 – d1 – e1 – g1 – a1 – c2 – d2. Zwei Notationsweisen sind üblich. Wird zur Notation der Violinschlüssel benutzt, ist die Notation .

Gayageum

The Gayageum ( also called Kayagŭm – 가야금 / 伽倻琴 ) is a traditional Korean instrument. I have seen it in many Korean movies so I got interested to learn more about it. I will share with you some information about its origins and usage. I will also include some links for you to listen to it or learn more about it.

The Gayageum is a string instrument similar to the zitler ( that is used in some European countries such as Germany and Austria) .

It is supposed that this instrument was created in the 6 th century by King Gasil (also known as Haji of Daegaya) following the model of the Chinese Guzheng , and it has been further improved thought out the years. Some recent archaeological excavations reveal, however, fragments of Gayageum that date back to around 1st century B.C.. This suggests that the instrument might have been in use much before the time of King Gasil .

Two version of the instrument are mainly used – beobgum is the version used in court music and the sanjo kayagum, better adapted for faster melodic passages with strings closer together, is used in folk music. The traditional Gayageum has 12 strings , but more recent versions can include up to 25 strings .

Pay attention to the fact that in Asia there are few string instruments that are similar to the Chinese Guzheng ( who is consider to be their ancestor ) but these instruments are not the same one ! I am talking about the Japanese koto, the Mongolian yatga, and the Vietnamese đàn tranh. These, together with the Guzheng and the Gayageum are similar and related to each other but are not the same instrument. The Gayageum is mostly mistaken with the Japanese koto , due to their similar features .

In future I will make another post, comparing those instruments, so you get a better idea.

Now back to the Gayageum are some facts about it .

– The traditional Gayageum consists of wooden body made of paulownia tree, twelve silk thread strings, and twelve wooden bridges that support each string.

– There are various way of playing Gayageum including solo, duet, trio.

– The Gayageum is a feminine instrument (mostly played by women).

– Since the late 20 th century, the traditional silk strings are often replaces with nylon-wrapped steel strings .

– The playing technique of the Gayageum is as following : the left-hand controls the string tension and the right hand is used for plucking the strings.

I think if you really want to learn about an instrument , you must listen to it !

– a male performance –  (The performer, Hwang Byeonggi, is the foremost South Korean player of the Kayagum )

2. This is an extract from a movie where I first remember spotting the Gayageum ( I might have seen it before without noticing ) .

3. This are extracts from a Korean drama. ( I think it was a good idea that they made one of the main characters to play this traditional instrument and bring the attention of the young people back to their culture and also attract instroduce it to young people from other nations )

( I cannot find a cut of the performance , so if you don’t want to watch the whole thing just skip to 3.00 min )

( skip to 10.15 – they are mixing modern and traditional instruments . ) – here another vesion 

4 . These are Gayageum versions of some modern songs .

– Let it be – ( here you can see that the women are playing sitting on chairs – this is not the traditional way ( that is sitting on the ground ) but innovation for performing in Western concert halls ( or you can just called it modernized way to performe )

– SNSD ‘GEE’ played by Gayageum, Drum and Guitar ( )

Gayageum

Kayagŭm

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Kayagŭm, also spelled kayakŭm or kayakeum or gayageum, Korean board zither with 12 silk strings, 12 movable bridges, and a convex upper surface. Fashioned from paulownia wood, it forms a rectangle about 160 cm (62 inches) long and 30 cm (12 inches) wide.

The player, who is seated on the floor, places one end of the instrument on the right knee while the other end rests on the floor. The strings are plucked to the right of the bridges with the thumb and first three fingers of the right hand, and the left hand presses down or pulls on the strings to the left of the bridges, producing microtonal ornamentations of pitch and the wide vibrato typically found in Korean music.

Known as the national instrument of Korea, the kayagŭm is played in many vocal and instrumental genres, often accompanied by the changgo drum. There are three variant types of kayagŭm, all associated with particular types of music—pungnyu kayagŭm for court and classical ensemble music, sanjo kayagŭm for folk and virtuosic music (such as sanjo, the music genre for which it is named), and “improved” kayagŭm for modern compositions. The kayagŭm is related to the Chinese zheng, the Japanese koto and wagon, and the Korean kŏmungo.

Kayagŭm

Luna Lee: The Gayageum Rocker

I recently discovered the incredible and unique sound of Luna Lee while watching a YouTube video of her playing Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” on a 6th century Korean string instrument. I was blown away and instantly became a fan — the super excited kind of fan who wants to watch all the videos on an artist’s YouTube channel and who says, “You have to watch this!” to everyone who walks in the room while I’m trying to do so. Many of you likely saw the same video as it’s gone viral and has over 4,000,000 YouTube views to date. But if not, you really need to see it now:

Luna plays R&B and Rock classics on a traditional Korean instrument known as the gayageum, a 12-string zither-like instrument related to the Chinese guzheng, Japanese koto, and Vietnamese đàn tranh. A quiet instrument with a beautiful sound, the gayageum was originally designed to play traditional Korean music in a small room during intimate gatherings. But Luna plays it like a rockstar. She saw amazing potential and possibilities in the gayageum, even though she recognized that its quiet sound was not well-suited to music created for drums, bass, and guitar. So Luna got busy. First she re-developed her gayageum for a sound that better matched modern instruments – increasing the volume and pressure, developing the tone, and increasing the sustain. Then she studied guitar effects and amplifiers, experimenting to see how they fit her instrument. And finally, she started playing contemporary music on it. The results of her efforts are stunning. It is as exciting to watch Luna play her music as it is to hear her play. Her passion for the music is obvious. Whether she is playing a rock classic like “Voodoo Child” or an iconic R&B track like B.B. King’s, “The Thrill is Gone,” Luna’s body language expresses the same mix of tension and ecstasy you see when great guitarists/musicians lose themselves in the music.

Luna is also an indie artist. She has talent, ingenuity, and drive, displays a willingness to work hard at her craft, and she has an artist’s passion to create and share her music. She first started sharing her music in 2009, posting her videos on YouTube. She uses social media to keep in touch with her fast-growing fanbase. She even released a well-received debut album in 2013 on a an indie label. More recently she decided to use the crowdfunding platform Patreon in order to gain more support for her music. Unlike other crowdfunding platforms that focus fan donations on just one creative project at a time such as an album, EP, or video, Patreon allows fans to become ongoing patrons of their favorite artists. Luna set up her Patreon page using the “pledge basis (with a maximum of four possible videos per month). Luna hopes using Patreon will eventually allow her to focus full-time on creating her unique fusion of Korean traditional and western contemporary music, and bringing our worlds closer together one note at a time.

Luna Lee: The Gayageum Rocker

Gayageum

kayagŭmkoreanisch가야금), ist eine in der klassischen koreanischen Musik gespielte Wölbbrettzither. Sie repräsentiert an führender Stelle die nationale Musikkultur Koreas.

Die erfunden. Man kann das Instrument bis auf das Jahr 551 n. Chr. zurückverfolgen, als ein Flüchtling aus dem Land Kaya aus Furcht vor Annexion nach Silla floh und dem König das neue Instrument Kayas, eine Gayageum, zum Geschenk machte.

Es gibt zwei traditionelle Typen der jeongak gayageum ist etwa 142 Zentimeter lang und 23 Zentimeter breit und wurde im 19. Jahrhundert für den Sanjo-Stil entwickelt. Die engere Anordnung der Saiten und die kürzere Länge des Instruments erleichtern die schnelleren Passagen des Sanjo. Beide Instrumente haben zwölf seidene Saiten (heute auch Nylonsaiten) und zwölf bewegliche Stege, die wie Füße von Wildgänsen geformt sind.

Die Stimmung der 1 – d1 – e1 – g1 – a1 – c2 – d2. Zwei Notationsweisen sind üblich. Wird zur Notation der Violinschlüssel benutzt, ist die Notation .

Gayageum

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Gayageum

Sanjo gayageum Sanjo gayageum Gayageum, auch kayagŭm (koreanisch 가야금), ist eine in der klassischen koreanischen Musik gespielte Wölbbrettzither.

26 Beziehungen: CelempungCrossSound FestivalDaniel N. SeelGanz Schön FeistGlissandoHan MalsookJason Kao HwangJeff SongJoseph CelliKacapiKarola ObermüllerKlaus Hinrich StahmerKoreanische KulturKotoLaurie San MartinListe bekannter Persönlichkeiten der Seoul National UniversityListe von MusikinstrumentenMarcel ChyrzyńskiPansoriSanjo (Musik)Stefan HakenbergVolker BlumenthalerWeltmusikYatgaZither.

Gayageum

Sanjo gayageum Sanjo gayageum Gayageum, auch kayagŭm (koreanisch 가야금), ist eine in der klassischen koreanischen Musik gespielte Wölbbrettzither.

12 Beziehungen: Đàn tranhGuzhengJangguJeongakKoreaKoreanische KulturKoreanische SpracheKotoSanjo (Musik)YatgaZither.

CrossSound Festival

Das CrossSound Festival in Juneau (Alaska) ist ein Musikfestival, das 1999 von der amerikanischen Gayageum-Spielerin Jocelyn Clark und dem deutschen Komponisten Stefan Hakenberg gegründet wurde.

Produktbeschreibungen

Derived mostly from pansori singing and originally largely improvised, „sanjo“ became (especially in the stylistic school of Master Choi Ok-Sam) a structured instrumental suite: On the 12 silk strings of the „gayageum“ zither, Kim Hae-Sook paints with virtuosic serenity, a musical landscape of exaltation and restrained emotion. The gayageum has a long oblong body and rests horizontally on the lap when played. The sanjo gayageum has 12 strings that symbolise the 12 months of the year, which are plucked with bare fingers of the right hand and then, while the sound lingers (not more than three seconds), either pressed, slid down or vibrated with the left hand. Gayageum sanjo involves a variety of out-of-tune tones, a technique commonly known as nonghyeon. This technique is widely used for musical expression in traditional Korean music.

Produktbeschreibungen

According to legend and to recent archeological digs, the Gayageum is a millennial zither-like instrument featured in all Korean traditional repertoires. Sanjo is usually translated as ’scattered melodies.‘ This style of music was informed by southwestern shamanic music (Sinawi) and the great epic songs (Pansori) from the same region. Melodies were improvised at first, then codified in the mid-19th century. Since then, they have evolved through lines of transmission (Ryu) from masters to pupils. Gayageum Sanjo compositions for 12-string Gayagrum, Prelude, 5 sanjo and 10 studies Each and every 34 pieces carries its own unique musical color sparking brightly with its distinctive luster just like a precious jewel. I think his Gayageum CD is something like a set of 34 pieces of jewels threaded onto a string. His Gayageum music opens up a unprecedented world of Gayageum music to us and each piece is as much attractive and musically tasty as other pieces. I could not help but feeling for more music listening to the 34th track, the last piece of this Hwang Byungki – Gayageum Composer and Performer Artistic director of the The National Orchestra of Korea Baudouin de Jaer Composer, violonist, Baudouin de Jaer studied composition with Philippe Boesmans, Henri Pousseur, Frederic Rzewski and at McGill University (Montréal) with Bruce Mather. He composes for the Korean instruments Daegeum, Haegeum, Gayageum and Geomungo, and for orchestras of Korean traditional instruments. In 2010 he resolved the enigmatic music system of Swiss artist Adolf Wölfli and released a CD called ‚The Heavenly Ladder‘ on the Sub Rosa label (SR312). In 2010, Baudouin de Jaer was awarded a prize from the National Gugak Center for his Gayageum compositions.

Koreanische Sprache

Die koreanische Sprache (Koreanisch) ist eine agglutinierende Sprache, die – hauptsächlich in Nord- und Südkorea – von mehr als 78 Millionen Menschen gesprochen wird, von denen die meisten Nord- oder Südkoreaner sind.

Neu!!: Gayageum und Koreanische SpracheMehr sehen »