List of our 100% free Gay Erotic Fiction

Small time medical office teaches me how to be a gay massive cock craving whore with therapy and medication…

Harris catches himself in a silly infatuation with his English professor, Mr. VanCarnel…

But mostly I love this city because it is blessed with an abundance of good-looking fellas, almost all of whom are members of the Air Force…

My first encounter with a hung top wasn’t quite what I was expecting, it was better…

This is completely fictional. 18+ story of love. This story is about how Alex and I Make all the happiest moments of our lives. Love, lust, and trust that made everything works like a miracle. I hope you like it…

the cable guy comes by and installs his wire in me…

James a lost city folk finds himself in lost in the backyard of Chris, you figure out the rest…

Even is a criminal who catches a lucky break when he is held at knife point by a stranger…

Married Sam goes for a bike ride secretly hoping to see outdoors activities and ends up naked and dominated by a hot stranger…

This is the story of a house of vampires a drifting vampire and his lover…

Kipp was a 6,3 white athlete for our HS with a 10 inch cock or at least that what he always said he was working with but now I can say he’s telling the truth…

�I don�t need a blind date, guys.��Well, you need some kind of a date. You�re not getting any younger.� Tommy was being kind for a change…

22 year old porn star tells his story through letters, Its part one of an 8 part story…

That guy. The hot one that is staring at me from across the room. Endless possibilities. Things could get a little… wet.

Patient goes into a doctors surgery for a currently medical condition only to end up getting more physical with his doctor than he imagined…

This is a story about situations that I have been increasingly fantasizing about more and more. Bring married scares me about going out and acting on my cravings, so I have been starting to use fantasy stories to release those cravings. Never written stories before so hope it’s enjoyable…

Disguised as a storm trooper, Poe Dameron infiltrates Station D’embra…

Otis meets a police office after his lover CJ gets into trouble with the law…

My first encounter with my new boss. Started as a simple day and turned into much more…

Ken and Daisuke have their first time in a closed place very hidden. They feel something very strong for each other and between the two they decide to have anal sex for the first time, nerves, tension and much illusion…

I asked my new friend Dane to setup a gangbang for me. He arranged two of his friends to join us at a motel…

A short fiction story about two straight guys in a dorm room…

A functional account of two future step brothers…

To best friends who have been friend through high school have sex for the first time…

A fictional account of a night at the fitness center…

Matthew gets a surprising visit from Richard after their football match & somebody could be very dangerous to themself and to others�

Just fictional fun – enjoy! Thus, I was really apprehensive about going to college. I knew I would be in a dorm with a roommate that I had never met, and even worse, that I would have to use a common bathroom with common showers…

More of the story. Hope you all are enjoying this fantasy!

An 18-year-old marathon runner suffers cramps and receives a helping hand – and tongue – from a middle-aged man…

An 18-year-old with a dead battery gets more than he bargained for when he asks a stranger for a jump…

Micheal has recently turned eighteen and is a virgin by choice. Damon is the 358 years old lover of his who has not had any type of sexual encounter in 50 years. It is ought to get out of control…

Part two of the hotel romance between Austin & Logan…

Last part. John takes a chance on a man he met at the gym…

As Faction X plans to release their new sextrooper army, Poe Dameron escapes with some unexpected help…

A curious straight co-worker comes over for a bit of fun…

The RESISTANCE fights against FACTION X, a group that has broken from the now fallen Galactic Empire, who plans to unleash an army of stortmtroopers with a very high yet deadly sex drive…

A shocking threesome takes place just 12 hours before a massive school hostage drama, involving Mr Kenny as a hostage…

Matthew finally comes face to face with his blackmailer & Austin goes threw another brutal assault…

I was in a gay theatre sitting against the back wall next to the entrance door…

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10 Gay Novels You Should Read

“Come Out On Top” is a great way to open a movie that’s as good as it is. It’s easy and enjoyable, like a shot of caffeine after a long day in the office, except this shot is much stronger than coffee. The song has a very catchy hook, but you know it’s so much more than just a song when you put on your best game face and get ready to fight.

2. I Love This Bar (2014).

“I Love This Bar” is the perfect song to play while you’re getting to know people. Like most music, the song can be pretty cheesy, but when you’re meeting people for the first time, you’re not that good of an actor. When the song plays, your eyes widen and you just start talking, and no matter how much you say, you won’t be able to explain how much you love your friend in one word.

3. Don’t Let Go (2013).

“Don’t Let Go” is kind of the theme song for the show. It sets the mood for the show. You feel the pressure, but you’re the only one who knows you’re the one, so you just have to let go. You’ve come to the right place. No matter what happens, you can handle it, because it’s the only place that you belong.

4. Do It for the Guy (2014).

“Do It For the Guy” is probably the most popular song. The video is cute, but it’s the song itself that gives the perfect mood for all the little moments that you have with your bae. The song has a very catchy hook, but it’s the lyrics that really make you love it.

5. I.

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List of our 100% free Gay Illustrated Stories

The story is about my room mate and me and our love life.. which is just in its infancy…

As it turned out Jeff went off to school and I didn’t see him for another year. When he showed up it was a surprise visit and he brought a roommate from college with him…

Collage Football jock comes out and Collage gymnast expresses his feelings for him…

Come with Chris, an African American and Italian teenager, as he tells his life story…

Mark and Gene finally get to the island to start their job. They also begin some very close friendships with some of the other boys. Very close friendships…

Mark and Gene finally get to the island to start their job. They also begin some very close friendships with some of the other boys. Very close friendships…

Mark and Gene came to Miami to spend the summer between their junior and senior year in high school with Gene’s brother Don…

Gene and Mark spend the summer between their junion and senior years with Gene’s brother Don and roommate Joe. They discovered Miami was a magical place. Even Gene’s 18th birthday present was special, very special…

It was the summer between our junior and senior years of high school and were so excited. My friend Gene and I had finally saved enough from caddying to afford a bus ticket to Miami…

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What women want: Gay male romance novels

This article was published more than 10 years ago. Some information in it may no longer be current.

Trends in contemporary popular fiction can be as unpredictable as fashion fads. Nobody expected, for instance, that the gloomy, bespectacled Harry Potter would help resuscitate the ailing book industry any more than Lady Gaga’s bizarre looks would help motivate retail sales. Yet today’s newest publishing trend is as out in left field as Potter and Gaga once were.

Over the past year, man-on-man romantic fiction – books featuring two male protagonists engaged in a sexual or emotional relationship with each other – has taken a significant bite out of one of publishing’s biggest markets. Amazon’s Kindle has had such success with the genre that the e-book site has tripled its „m/m“ stock since January, 2010. Even Harlequin – the most profitable and old-fashioned romance fiction house in the world – has recently started to publish same-sex love stories via the company’s digital imprint, Carina Press. What’s most surprising, though, are the types of readers the books have hooked: Straight, married women are among the genre’s top fans. That may be because the authors, such as Iowa’s Heidi Cullinan, a 37-year-old suburban mother of two, are frequently heterosexual females, too. Cullinan has penned such recent works as the popular gay romance Double Blind and the homoerotic fantasy Miles and The Magic Flute.

„One of the reasons why more women are ravenous for these books is that they want to read something about gay men that doesn’t involve them suffering from [HIV/AIDS] committing suicide or getting bullied. I know I was,“ Cullinan says, adding that mainstream TV shows such as Queer As Folk and True Blood have helped heterosexuals embrace guy-on-guy fantasies as „normal.“ „When I saw Brokeback Mountain [in 2005] my husband had to drive me away from the theatre for 45 minutes while I yelled out the car window because I didn’t like the [tragic]ending,“ says Cullinan, who also devotes her time to LGBT advocacy in her hometown. „I was really tired of dead gay men in films and books or campy guys who never had sex, so I wanted to fix the problem and show that gay men were having great sex and had complicated, interesting relationships that people would love to know about.“

Cullinan’s hunch was right. Her first book, last year’s Special Delivery, not only sold well enough to help her pay off a chunk of her student loan, but swiftly led to commissions to turn out a pair of sequels. Special Delivery focuses on a handsome, Iowa-based nurse named Randy and a studly, out-of-state trucker. Cullinan’s publisher, Dreamspinner Press, clearly saw the potential of the genre, but it hasn’t been the only one. In 2009, Pennsylvania’s Running Press unveiled a new line of m/m soft-core erotica on the basis of growing demand. Most telling, however, are the 15 m/m erotic romance titles in Harlequin’s Carina Press division since June.

„Now that [Harlequin]has started a gay romance line, my prayers have been answered,“ says Erastes, a 47-year-old British author whose novella Muffled Drum will be published by Carina in July. Erastes – her pen name is Greek for „lover of boys“ – says that six years ago there were no options for m/m authors like herself, whereas today it’s challenging to meet the demand. „We are in a totally different world now: I can’t keep up,“ she says.

Erastes, who has been married to a man for more than 15 years and is director of the Erotic Authors Association, writes historical fiction that focuses on closeted men who are fearful of getting caught in the act. One of her biggest-selling novels, Frost Fair, is set in 1814 and tells the story of Gideon Frost, a printer and covert part-time prostitute who carries on a secret affair with a wealthy ruffian named Joshua Redfern.

„The uber-masculine stock characters portrayed in gay romances have always had great appeal with heterosexual women,“ Rinaldo Walcott, an associate sociology professor at the University of Toronto, notes, adding that soap operas have banked on them since their inception. „It’s like a constant reliving of the Rock Hudson narrative. The unattainable is what makes these books so desirable and many straight women are now willing to investigate their own sexual curiosities.“

Erastes offers a lighter take. „Well, two men in bed together are hot,“ she says with a chuckle. „But the main reason I write Regency-era novels which only feature men in [sexual and emotional situations]is that the Regency female character isn’t as interesting to me. She has to be a blue stocking or some sort of slave abolitionist or supremely feisty. With gay historicals, I feel you have the option to break the stereotypes and have your protagonists go off on swashbuckling adventures as well as unpredictable romances.“

Unlike Erastes and Cullinan, author Alex Beecroft’s motivation for writing about the love that dared not speak its name has little to do with advocacy or adventure. The 45-year-old Irish mother of two, who currently lives in Cambridge, England, admits that writing queer content addresses what she calls her own „layered sexuality.“ „When I started, it was a revelation,“ she says of her first book, Captain’s Surrender. „Although I have a very heterosexual life with my husband, writing m/m romance felt like I was coming out in a way: I am writing about all the fantasies I have had since I hit puberty. There is an element of women’s sexuality that has not been able to express itself for such a long time. These books allow that for me and the reader.“

The criticism that m/m romances written by women for women is akin to lesbian pornography made specifically for straight men doesn’t fly with Beecroft. „I have to disagree with that completely – what we do is not porn,“ she says. „False Colors [Beecroft’s second novel]has two or three sex scenes in it – 333 pages of plot and three pages are sex. Are people ignoring the other 300 pages?“

Regardless of the genre’s literary pretensions and its growing appeal with readers, m/m romantic fiction has yet to clear a big hurdle: getting onto Wal-Mart shelves. As the world’s largest retailer and the place that dictates whether romance novels graduate to bestsellerdom, Wal-Mart has had a history of banning products that rock the status quo. Even so, Walcott of the University of Toronto suggests that it won’t be long before you can throw titles by Beecroft, Cullinan and Erastes into your cart along with your cereal and personal hygiene products.

„I think that gay Harlequins will inevitably trump Wal-Mart’s strategies,“ he says. „The [reader]numbers will be too staggering to ignore.“

50 Must-Read Gay Romance Novels

The world of gay romance novels is, if not quite as vast as the world of m/f romance, still quite expansive. Are you looking for a royal-commoner romance? A fake marriage? Something dark and gritty, or something that’s the literary equivalent of a basket of puppies? Whatever it is that floats your romance boat, I guarantee there’s an m/m romance out there that will satisfy.

In making this list, I’ve highlighted as many #ownvoices authors as possible. There’s a misconception that the only people who write m/m romance are straight women, and while it’s true that some of the biggest names in gay romance are straight women, there are also dozens of queer men writing fantastic gay romance. But because of the biases and shortcomings of publishing (and a slew of other complicated factors), it’s straight women who often get the most recognition in the genre.

This is not to say that straight women can’t, or shouldn’t, write gay romance novels. You’ll find several (including some of my absolute favorites!) on this list. You’ll also find many wonderful books by queer men that deserve the same praise and recognition. I’ve tried to make this list as wide-ranging as possible, and it includes books about diverse characters written by queer men and women, queer authors of color, and trans and genderqueer writers.

Over the years, these tales of queer happily ever afters have brought me much joy and comfort. Whether you’re entirely new to gay romance novels, or whether you’ve been reading them for years, I hope they’ll bring you the same delight.

Note: Books marked with an asterisk are #ownvoices, which, in this case, means that the author is a queer man. Many of the other novels on this list are #ownvoices for different reasons. I’ve chosen only to make note of books written by queer men, but it is by no means intended to erase or ignore the many other identities held by the fabulous writers who have produced these works.

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The Best Classic LGBTQ+ Novels

Recently, Alan Hollinghurst said the gay novel is dead. “There was an urgency, a novelty to the whole thing,” said the gay authorThe Line of Beauty. “And in our culture at least those things are no longer the case.” With all due respect to Hollinghurst, it is still an urgent time to write (and read) about LGBTQ+ lives. Queer people face dangerous and deadly challenges — both in the United States and abroad — and it falls on writers to continue to bring these stories to light.

To this end, The Advocate asked the fiction nominees of the 2019 Lambda Literary Awards to nominate the best LGBTQ+ novels of all time. Oureditors then added our own selections. Spanning from the 19th century to the present day, these books demonstrate that, while much has changed for LGBTQ+ people, many struggles persist. Their words have much to offer in lessons about our history, our shared experience of being otherized, and how to address the challenges of today.

Below, see The Advocate’s ranking of the best LGBTQ+ novels ever written. Nominate your own favorites in the comments.

1. Giovanni’s Room, by James Baldwin

Author Chavisa Woods is far from alone when calling Giovanni’s Room “masterfully written, heartbreaking.” It’s a book that has resonated with so many queer people since first being published in 1956, speaking to issues of identity even now. Woods, a Lambda :Literary Award nominee for her novel Things to Do When You’re Goth in the Country, says Baldwin succeeded at “blurring the lines of hero and villain and bringing the complexity of human nature into horrifying focus.” Maybe that’s because Baldwin said the book isn’t actually about being gay. “Giovanni’s Room is not really about homosexuality,” said Baldwin in a 1980 interview about queer life. “It’s the vehicle through which the book moves. Go Tell It on the Mountain, for example, is not about a church, and Giovanni is not really about homosexuality. It’s about what happens to you if you’re afraid to love anybody.”

3. The Price of Salt, by Patricia Highsmith

On the heels of her successful debut novel Strangers on a Train (with its own intimations of queerness), an encounter Patricia Highsmith had with a New Jersey socialite while working at a shopgirl at a department store became the seed for 1952’s The Price of Salt. The result, which Highsmith’s publisher forced her to publish under the pseudonym Claire Morgan at a time when a bold depiction of desire between women that eschewed the requisite tragic ending for those who transgressed could have tanked her career, would become that rare example of a lesbian-themed novel with what would prove to be a radically hopeful ending.

„A novel that is simultaneously of its time and timeless, and it holds the distinction of being the first of its kind to have a happy ending,“ Yolanda Wallace said of the novel. SJ Sindu, author of Marriage of a Thousand Lies, called it, „One of the first Anglophone works to challenge the trope of the sad/suicidal gays who die at the end, this book gave us a blueprint of what queer fiction could look like.“

The Price of Salt’s dizzyingly erotically charged prose also telegraphed her signature sense of an ominous „menace“ (in this case, the threat of being caught or found out just as the Red Scare hit the United States). Highsmith went on to write more queer-tinged fiction, including The Talented Mr. Ripley and all of the Ripley novels to follow.

The Price of Salt, of course, became the critically acclaimed Todd Haynes-helmed 2015 film Carol ,starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara. 

5. Maurice, by E.M. Forster

Although the great E.M. Forster (A Passage to India, A Room With a View, Howards End) wrote the benchmark gay novel Maurice circa 1913, it was published posthumously in 1971.

In a lush tale of manners, position, and desire, the titular character meets and falls for his classmate Clive while at Oxford. The pair embark on a two-year affair until Clive leaves Maurice to marry a woman and live out his proscribed life as part of the landed gentry, leaving Maurice in shambles and seeking to cure his homosexuality.

But Forster’s novel does not end in gay tragedy. Maurice falls in love with another man, Alec Scudder, and finally abandons his station so that they can be together. The author of Night Drop, Marshall Thornton called the novel „the original gay romance.“ A note found on Forster’s manuscript for Maurice, which was discovered tucked in a drawer, read “Publishable, but worth it?” Ismail Merchant and James Ivory adapted the novel to the big screen in a gorgeous film starring James Wilby, Hugh Grant, and Rupert Graves. 

7. The Line of Beauty, by Alan Hollinghurst

Alan Hollinghurst famously questioned the future of the gay novel this year, which is striking since he’s often viewed as helping make queer books accessible to a mainstream audience. His 2004 novel broke through in a major way — The Line of Beauty won that year’s prestigious Man Booker Prize for fiction.

Hollinghurt was praised for his expert command of the English language and his flawless re-creation of upper-class British society and conservative political circles of the 1980s. Hollinghurst set his pen on the sexual hypocrisies of homophobic politicians, many of whom had their own indiscretions behind closed doors. The book follows Nick Guest, a gay graduate student unofficially adopted by the family of a schoolmate. Nick gets a sneak peek at the aristocracy, while indulging in no shortage of sex and party favors; the fun comes to a crashing halt as AIDS enters the fray. Amid all the human drama, there’s an amusing and memorable cameo from the Iron Lady. „Captures a vitally important era in lovely prose“ is how Night Drop’s Marshall Thornton describes Hollinghurst’s most acclaimed book.

8. Rubyfruit Jungle, by Rita Mae Brown

Many queer female writers see Rita Mae Brown’s 1973 coming-of-age book as an iconic work of LGBT literature: „[I love Rubyfruit Jungle] because, well, because. I think this was the first ‚lesbian‘ book I ever read! And devoured. And loved,“ writes The Year of Needy Girls‘ Patricia Smith. Yolanda Wallace, author of Tailor-Made, tells us, „When I was a teenager questioning my sexuality, this book provided the answers I was looking for.“

Semi-autobiographical, Rubyfruit Jungle follows Molly Bolt’s amorous adventures from childhood to adulthood, including a stint in swinging New York City. While Molly has sexual adventures with men, her true love is women, and Brown never shies away from describing Molly’s insatiable passion for the ladies (the title perfectly captures Molly’s zeal for female anatomy). Now assigned in many queer literature courses, Rubyfruit Jungle is brazen and brave; its frank discussion of lesbian sexuality can seem shocking to modern readers who imagine life in the early 1970s was less raunchy. Rubyfruit Jungle is a page-turning reminder that queer lust and queer sex are timeless.

9. Zami, by Audre Lorde

„She calls it a biomythography and leads us through a heart-wrenching account of the black lesbian experience.“ – SJ Sindu, Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction Winner

This 1982 autobiography by the iconic queer black poet Audre Lorde is an experience of intersectionality, in a genre of intersections. Lorde classified it as biomythography, which combines history, biography, and myth.

A fierce love letter to the strength women have given her throughout her upbringing, the book explores her challenges growing up blind in 1930s Harlem, fighting for dignity in the heat of Jim Crow, and finding a voice in the New York City lesbian bar scene.

While books like The Price of Salt show lesbians walking away from motherhood, Zami celebrates the beauty of when mothers stay through the harshest of challenges.

11. The City and the Pillar, by Gore Vidal

The City and the Pillar shocked America when it was released in 1948. The queer coming-of-age novel about Jim Willard and his search for love was the first novel from a respected writer (Gore Vidal) to speak directly and sympathetically about the gay experience in an era when homosexuality was still very much taboo. The book is remembered today for this legacy as well as for various themes — Hollywood’s glass closet, being gay in the military, the poisonous effects of homophobia on society — that still reverberate today.

12. The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde

The only novel by the great Oscar Wilde may not be overtly gay, but there’s plenty of gay subtext there for the careful reader – about as much gay subtext as a popular author could get away with in 1891.

Dorian’s friends Basil Hallward and Lord Henry Wotton express intense admiration for his beauty, and passages that show Basil’s feelings for Dorian as more clearly homoerotic were excised by an editor, according to Nicholas Frankel, who edited an edition presenting Wilde’s original text in 2011.

Even the text as originally published has references to Dorian’s corruption of not only young women but young men: “There was that wretched boy in the Guards who committed suicide. You were his great friend,” Basil tells Dorian at one point. “There was Sir Henry Ashton, who had to leave England, with a tarnished name. You and he were inseparable.” “At the Wilde trials of 1895, the opposing attorneys read aloud from ‘Dorian Gray,’ calling it a ‘sodomitical’ book,” Alex Ross wrote in The New Yorker in 2011. “Wilde went to prison not because he loved young men but because he flaunted that love, and ‘Dorian Gray’ became the chief exhibit of his shamelessness.”

13. City of Night by John Rechy

City of Night, a 1963 novel by John Rechy, is a seminal piece of fiction that follows the life of a gay hustler in New York City, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and San Francisco. Through stream-of-consciousness narration, the reader gets a glimpse of queer life in mid-century America, with a long and fascinating cast of characters that includes drag performers, S&M practitioners, and sex workers. The book has inspired music from the Doors as well as a film by Gus Van Sant, My Own Private Idaho. „This epic chronicle of gay culture in the American sixties is as far-reaching as it is important, giving us a glimpse into identity and motive,” affirmed SJ Sindu, the author of Marriage of a Thousand Lies.

14. Stone Butch Blues, by Leslie Feinberg

Well ahead of its time, Leslie Feinberg’s 1993 Stone Butch Blues, about Jess Goldberg, a butch working-class lesbian, took massive strides in breaking down the gender binary. A story that is both hopeful in Jess’s determination to forge an identity and heartrending in its depiction of violence against her for her daring to be herself, Stone Butch Blues endures as essential to the queer canon. Feinberg, whose bio reads “writer and transgender activist,” would in later years become known more for activism, but the landmark novel about Jess’s refusal to fit into a prescribed box for gender is arguably Feinberg’s legacy.

15. Tales of the City, by Armistead Maupin

Gay literature was forever changed the day Mary Ann Singleton first met her transgender landlady, Anna Madrigal, when she moved to San Francisco’s 28 Barbary Lane. What began as serialized stories in the San Francisco Chronicle by writer Armistead Maupin became a 1978 novel. It was followed by a Tales of the City series of books, which chronicled decades of queer life in the Golden Gate City, including the AIDS crisis. Tales of the City was adapted in 1993 into a PBS television miniseries, which starred Laura Linney and Olympia Dukakis. The pair are set to reprise their roles in an upcoming Netflix adaptation, proving the enduring power of Maupin’s words.

16. A Boy’s Own Story, by Edmund White

A Boy’s Own Story is comparable to another literary classic, J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. The 1982 book by Edmund White, which begins with the first sexual encounter of a 15-year-old boy, is based on his own experiences coming to terms with his gay identity as a youth in the Midwestern United States. White would later write two additional novels, The Beautiful Room Is Empty (1988) and The Farewell Symphony (1997), which follow his gay protagonist into young adulthood. Together, they form a poignant trilogy that chronicles a gay life in the latter half of the 20th century.

17. Well of Loneliness, by Radclyffe Hall

Integral to the lesbian canon (despite its being considered somewhat problematic) British writer Radclyffe Hall’s 1928 novel focuses on Stephen Gordon, an upper-class lesbian who dons men’s clothing and becomes a novelist who eventually becomes a part of a literary salon in Paris at a time when there were no overt laws expressly barring homosexuality. Hall’s novel was groundbreaking in her introduction of the views of “sexologists” Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis, who posited that homosexuality was an inborn, unalterable trait that was considered a congenital sexual inversion that simply meant a “difference” and not a defect. The novel also stood trial on obscenity charges both in the United Kingdom where the book was deemed obscene and ordered destroyed, and in the United States, where it was eventually banned.

18. Fun Home, by Allison Bechdel

You might not expect to see a graphic novel in this list, but iconic cartoonist (and Bechdel test namesake) Alison Bechdel always takes the less traveled road. Off the success of her comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, she created the deeply personal Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, which touches on her dysfunctional relationship with her father through a lesbian lens. Chronicling Bechdel’s confusing childhood in rural Pennsylvania, the book took seven years to create in Bechdel’s laborious artistic process, which included photographing herself in poses that are drawn into each human figure.

This queer exploration of broken family, unraveling emotions, and suicide was a New York Times best seller, and snagged nominations for the National Book Critics Circle Award and three Eisner Awards – becoming a mainstream critical and commercial success. 

The book was adapted into a musical, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. When it hit Broadway in 2015, it won the Tony Award for Best Musical.

19. Death in Venice, by Thomas Mann

Some might say Death in Venice is not necessarily a gay novel, since there is no overt same-sex coupling or coitus. Others might say it’s about a man with pedophilic tendencies. Then others might say it’s brilliant.

German writer Thomas Mann crafted this novella based on his own experience in Venice, where he caught sight of a handsome young man who captivated him, body and soul. Is Aschenbach, the 50-something protagonist, just fixated on beautiful objects, where human beings and centuries-old buildings are of equal lure? Or is it something more lustful and disturbing? It’s difficult, in 2018, to divorce the rich subject of sexual desire from the fact that it revolves around a 14-year-old boy. But the novella’s legacy endures, amd it serves as an important artifact of secret desire at the turn of the 20th century. 

20. Under the Udala Trees, by Chinelo Okparanta

„This lyrical book is a wonderful story with a background of a civil war and a love story between two young girls on the frontlines. Wonderful book,“ gay refugee activist and columnist Danny Ramadan raves about the global-minded story.

The book unpacks the emotional life of a young girl displaced by the Nigerian civil war who begins a gut-wrenching affair with a fellow refugee. These girls are from different ethnic communities, forcing them to face not only the taboos of being queer but the prejudices of surviving in a nation that is eating itself alive.

„A great recollection of everything anyone would say in Nigeria against homosexuality using the defense of religion,“ explains David Nnanna Ikpo, the Nigerian author of Fimisile Forever.

21. Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, by Jeanette Winterson

Jeanette Winterson’s first novel, published in 1985, is a semiautobiographical coming-of-age story about a girl growing up in a Pentecostal family in England’s industrial Midlands region.

Winterson captures the weirdness of religious zealotry with the authority of someone who’s lived in this environment, and her portrayal of the young woman’s burgeoning lesbian sexuality – problematic in the Pentecostal world – rings true as well. Quirky and memorable secondary characters further enhance the novel, which made Winterson a literary star overnight, esteemed by both readers and fellow authors.

“A beautiful piece of fiction, this novel takes us through the complicated relationship between religion and LGBTQ+ identity.”, says SJ Sindu, the prize-winning author of Marriage of a Thousand Lies.

22. The Hours, by Michael Cunningham

Cunningham’s 1998 novel, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award, tells three parallel stories involving queer characters in different times and places.

In England in the 1920s, Virginia Woolf struggles with depression and writing Mrs. Dalloway, a novel to which Cunningham pays homage; in mid-20th-century Los Angeles, housewife Laura Brown, discontented with her life, confronts her attraction to women; and in 1990s New York City, Clarissa Vaughan, who is lesbian, plans a party for her best friend, writer Richard Brown, a gay man dying of AIDS.

Cunningham weaves their stories together seamlessly and movingly in a novel that is deservedly recognized as a modern classic.

The 2002 film adaptation, written by David Hare and directed by Stephen Daldry, received several Oscar nominations, and Nicole Kidman won Best Actress for her portrayal of Woolf. It costarred Julianne Moore, Meryl Streep, and Ed Harris.

23. A Little Life, by Hanya Yanagihara

In 2015, when the novel was published, reviewer and author Garth Greenwell declared in The Atlantic, A Little Life: The Great Gay Novel Might Be Here.” Hanya Yanagihara’s story of four friends — Jude, Malcolm, JB, and Willem — lasts over 700 pages as you witness the evolution of friendship and love between these men who met in college. We follow them for three decades, withstanding alongside them the waves of trauma that life so often sends. The friends survive together, as described in intensely vulnerable detail. Yanagihara talked with The Guardian about friendship and hardship. “We might all have had that feeling: as a friend, what is my responsibility to save someone who doesn’t want to be saved? Or tell someone to keep living when they don’t want to live?” Gay men are often blindsided by A Little Life’s penetrating clarity about what binds them or drives them apart.

24. Tipping the Velvet, by Sarah Waters

Sarah Waters’s 1998 page-turner is the coming-of-age story of Nan, a Whitstable “oyster girl” (talk about a euphemism) circa 1890 who, upon taking in a show in her local theater, becomes smitten with the charismatic masher (male impersonator) Kitty. Waters’s heroine follows Kitty to London, where the more experienced woman schools Nan in the ways of impersonating a dapper dandy onstage.

The pair begin performing as men together and become the toast of London’s music halls while simultaneously falling in love. Heartbreak eventually ensues and Nan is left to her own defenses on the streets in the big city. She dabbles in sex work to survive before she becomes a boy-toy for a wealthy older lesbian renowned for throwing Bacchanalian gatherings of women. Finally, though, without the trappings of a male alter ego, Nan comes into her own.

The book, an immediate smash with queer women for its frank depiction of lesbian desire and of flirting with gender roles, was made into a 2002 BBC miniseries that reinvigorated interest in the novel, which won the Lambda Literary Award and earned a place on the New York Times list of notable books the year it was published. 

„Love the sensuousness of it, the unapologetic portrayal of Nan—the sex scenes,“ said Patty Smith, author of The Year of Needy Girls.

25. Faggots, by Larry Kramer

Larry Kramer, a founder of ACT UP and the playwright of The Normal Heart, may be known for his vocal AIDS activism. But his 1978 novel, Faggots, was also a loud statement that portrayed the hedonism of gay New York City. The book features a cast of dozens of gay men, who variously engage in bathhouse orgies, use a slew of party drugs, and cavort in clubs with names like The Toilet Bowl and Fire Island. The book was condemned by numerous LGBT people upon its release for what many perceived as sex-negativity. But the ensuing AIDS crisis established Faggots as a bellwether of the storm to come.

10 LGBT Graphic Novels & Comics to Add to Your Reading List

It’s the best time of the year to sit in the park and relax with a good book! While some people love diving into lengthy novels and memoirs, other readers are more visually driven. So here are 10 awesome graphic novels and comics that use compelling writing and interesting art to tell diverse, LGBT stories! 

1) Snapshots of a Girl

Beldan Sezen’s autobiographical novel depicts her coming of age and coming out as a lesbian as the daughter of Turkish immigrants living in western Europe. In a series of vignettes, she navigates family issues, bad dates, self-doubt, and sexual politics. While fans of Alison Bechdel’s work will enjoy Snapshots of a Girl, Sezen’s illustration, voice, and story are unique. Buy it here.

2) The Less Than Epic Adventures of TJ and Amal

This 528-page Lambda Literary Award winning book collects the full 2009-2014 run of E.K. Weaver’s critically acclaimed gay road trip romance. It’s the perfect graphic novel to take on your own road trip this summer. Buy it here. 

8) Skim

Skim by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki follows Kimberly Keiko Cameron when she’s accepted to a private girls’ school in the early 90s. The critically acclaimed graphic novel deals with homosexuality, suicide and depression, manipulative peers, and all the heartache of being sixteen. Buy it here.

10) Fogtown

Looking for a pulpy detective novel with a gay protagonist? Fogtown, authored by Andersen Gabrych and illustrated by Brad Rader, should definitely be on your summer reading list. The novel follows Frank Grissel, a closeted private eye in 1953 San Francisco. Buy it here.

The biggest collection of flash gay porn games is shared on Play the hottest gay sex games of various genres and styles. Enjoy gays porn games now.

Benoit Denizet-Lewis asked our country’s leading queer writers to suggest five indispensable books.

Of all the gay books on the shelves of A Different Light Bookstore in San Francisco, I’m not sure why I left with Larry Kramer’s Faggots.

I certainly didn’t see myself as a faggot (I played sports, I was a top), but there was something about that book, with its yellow cover and audacious title, that made it irresistible as my first gay-themed book purchase. Still, I was sure to buy it alongside Dan Woog’s Jocks: True Stories of America’s Gay Male Athletes. Even in a gay bookstore with a blue-haired lesbian working the cash register, I was self-conscious about what people might think.

The year was 1997, and gay bookstores still existed in most big American cities. I was 21 and back home for the summer in my hometown of San Francisco, where a year before I had come out to my dad. “I guess this is what I get for raising you in San Francisco,” he’d said, slumping down in a chair as if he’d been shot.

My dad and I can laugh about it now while watching Modern Family, but at the time it struck me as a snotty thing to say. (What I really needed was a hug.) My dad had it all wrong, anyway. Growing up a few minutes from the Castro didn’t make me gay—if anything, it made me less likely to see myself that way. I couldn’t relate to AIDS or leather chaps, both of which seemed to be afflicting many of the gay men I saw on the corner of Castro and Market, where, in middle school, I had to transfer buses on my way home from school.

When gays from small Midwestern towns tell me how cool that must have been, I smile politely and don’t dare tell them I would have gladly traded places. Growing up near the Castro in the 1980s was confusing and occasionally frightening, and it probably delayed my coming out by a few years. “If this is what gay is,” I thought to myself, “then I’m definitely not that.”

I couldn’t really relate to the characters in Faggots, either, and I don’t think I even finished the book. But it’s still on my bookshelf all these years later, sandwiched between Scott Heim’s terrific novel Mysterious Skin and Frank Browning’s probing sociological portrait of gay life, .

I wish someone had given me a list of required gay reading when I was coming out. Gay men gave me a lot of things back then (porn, theater tickets, crabs), but no one gave me book titles. As a young gay man, I could have used a literary roadmap to help me put my experiences—and my feelings—in some historical and sociological context. As a young writer, I could have used being better read. Why didn’t anyone tell me that I needed to know who Paul Monette was?

In an effort to right those wrongs, and to do my part to promote gay cultural literacy in a time of vanishing gay bookstores and vanishing attention spans, I’ve asked some of the country’s most interesting and iconic LGBT writers—including Michael Cunningham, Edmund White, John Waters, and Patricia Nell Warren—to suggest five books that every LGBT person should have on his bookshelf (or Kindle).

I also came up with my own list, doing my best to choose books that didn’t appear on many others:

Limiting important LGBT-themed books to a short list isn’t easy. “No single set of five books can possibly serve the diverse hungers and desires that make up LGBTQ,” Kate Bornstein, a transgender author and performance artist, emailed me to say when she turned in her selections, which include Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City and the classic BDSM novel The Marketplace. Bornstein’s right, but the remarkable diversity of the books on these lists means that there’s a good summer read for just about everyone.

What’s the best gay book ever written? The work that appears on the most lists is James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, which is set in Paris’ gay subculture in the middle of the 20th century and which writer Alexander Chee selected as one of his five titles. “It’s a searing, perfect novel,” he explained, “with few if any rivals for the way it brings us into the mind of a closeted young man fighting both to love and not to love his one great love, and the cost of this battle within him.”

Other writers with books nominated multiple times include Jean Genet, Andrew Holleran, Alan Hollinghurst, Christopher Isherwood, Anne Carson, Herman Melville, Alice Walker, Virginia Woolf, Edmund White, Alison Bechdel, J.R. Ackerley, and Tony Kushner. Though author Michael Cunningham didn’t include Kushner’s play Angels in America among his five titles, he urged me to give it its due. “Although it is not prose or poetry, I can’t quite imagine a roundup of gay and lesbian literature that didn’t include it,” he wrote. “Angels in America is, to me, probably the seminal work to date about gay life (and so much of un-gay life at the same time).”

Several writers I reached out to wrote eloquently about how discovering the books on their lists—often as fearful, closeted teenagers—had changed the trajectory of their lives. “I am not being hyperbolic when I say that Good Times, Bad Times saved my life,” Mississippi Sissy author Kevin Sessums emailed me to say about James Kirkwood’s little-known novel, which is set in a boarding school run by an evil headmaster. “I read this it thrice during my teenage years in which I suddenly began using words like ‘thrice.’ It’s about the nuances of male bonding as well as the price one pays for being different and, yes, defiant. Just typing these sentences makes me want to read it for a fourth time. I’m sure it will speak just as profoundly to me as an adult because somewhere deep within the truest part of myself is still that 16-year-old from Mississippi who longed for romantic love when what he was offered had to be defined as friendship.”

Many of the nominated books are not explicitly gay-themed but drip with homoerotic subtext. Patricia Nell Warren, author of the classic gay novel , emailed me to explain why she included T.E. Lawrence’s 1922 book Seven Pillars of Wisdom among her selections.

“Few LGBT readers ever mention T.E. Lawrence’s war memoir, yet it deserves a key place among our historical classics,” Warren wrote. “Colonel Lawrence outed himself as thoroughly as a war hero and army officer could dare to do in post–World War I Britain. He never uses the word ‘gay,’ of course, but it’s crystal clear what he’s talking about. In the early 1950s, I read it in high school for a World War I book report, and cried my eyes out over the love story of Daud and Farraj, with its setting of the horrors of desert warfare. It was the first book that I ever happened upon that mirrored to me what LGBT identity is all about.”

Want to know what other books made Warren’s list? What follows are the literary favorites of some of our country’s most accomplished LGBT writers.

Before we get to that, though, I thought I would leave you with some terrific advice—too often unheeded in my own life, I’m ashamed to admit—courtesy of John Waters. “We need to make books cool again,” he said. “If you go home with someone and they don’t have books, don’t fuck them.”

Twinky Toons

Erotic drawings, adult comics and cartoons featuring very cute sexy twinks by talented British artist. The comic series features both solo toons and gay hardcore sex. Regularly updated comic series and features. Plus free access to sites with twink videos! [ read our review ]

Growl Boys

Gay porn with a supernatural theme – videos, pictures and comic books featuring guys turning into mystical furry creatures, beasts and demons. [ read our review ]

Class Comics

Erotic Gay Comics in Print and Digital Editions for Download! Read the sex filled Camili-Cat, Naked Justice, Zahn, Deimos, The Pornomicon, Brother to Dragons, Angelface, Tug Harder and others by Patrick Fillion, Logan, Benoit, HvH, Ismael Alvarez, Max‘ and others.

Hornstown [v 5.21]

In this open world game you’ll see lots of different fetishes, gay and lesbian sex, even shemales and many more. Your character can be transformed between genders. Explore various locations in the big city and meet hundreds of characters out there. You’ll have to manage your time to live the life of a regular citizen.

Dog Days of Summer [v 0.4.8]

This game contains almost only lesbian content. Take the role of the Vivian, a last year student in the college. She was living mostly regular life but then she met Tara, a woman full of secrets that changed her life completely.

Tactical Submission by ada maria soto

MCs: a gay SWAT commander who’s mostly in the closet about being kinky and submissive and a bisexual, polyamorous kinky doctor who works for the coroner’s office.Setting: L.A. CountyTropes/themes/secondary plot: BDSM, polyamory, characters dealing with PTSD, lots of on-the-page sex (this one is definitely erotic romance) bisexual, polyamorous MC

* by damon suede

MCs: two lifelong best friends and Brooklyn firefighters (who may or may not have been hiding their feelings for each other for years) who decide to work as models for a gay porn website because one of them is basically broke.Setting: Brooklyn post-9/11Tropes/themes/secondary plot: friends to lovers; total hilarity; a satisfying and authentic secondary cast of friends and family; tasty homemade Italian food described in gay MCs

*Tigers and Devils by Sean Kennedy

MCs: a famous football player who’s spent his life in the closet and a mega football fan who is also kinda lonely and runs an independent film festival.Setting: Melbourne, AustraliaTropes/themes/secondary plot: sports romance; lots of angst; celebrity romance; characters dealing with homophobia (from the public and in their families); a wonderful and heartwarming collection of friends and chosen family surrounding both gay MCs

Gays of Our Lives by Kris Ripper

MCs: a somewhat grumpy recluse who has MS, which sometimes means his body does not act as he wants it to, and a super cheerful, open and not-at-all grumpy artist/hipster.Setting: Oakland/Bay AreaTropes/themes/secondary plot: adorable opposites-attract romance; a character that deals with chronic illness on a daily basis, especially as his illness pertains to sex; BDSM; a strong sense of queer community and queer disabled MC

*Starting from Scratch by Jay Northcote

MCs: a quiet trans college student who’s just returned to university after transitioning and the outgoing ex of one of his friends.Setting: Plymouth, EnglandTropes/themes/secondary plot: college romance; authentic and sweet depiction of friendship among young gay university students; some downright adorable and geeky board game trans MC

Shame and A Disgrace by Holley Trent

MCs: a pharmaceutical sales rep who’s just dumped his much younger boyfriend who he thinks is too young to settle down and commit, and the much younger boyfriend, who is determined to win back the love of his life.Setting: New OrleansTropes/themes/secondary plot: second chance romance; age gay MCs

*For Real by Alexis Hall

MCs: a thirty-something trauma doctor and submissive who’s getting tired of the BDSM scene he’s been a part of for so long and a 19-year-old line cook who is just coming out as kinky and dominant.Setting: LondonTropes/themes/secondary plot: age gap romance; BDSM; lots of angst surrounding the MCs emotional openness; a strong circle of friends and chosen family; a slow-burn romance; a fair bit of on-the-page gay MCs

*The Nothingness of Ben by Brad Boney

MCs: a rising hotshot lawyer who is forced to return home to care for his three teenage brothers after his father dies and his next-door, small-town, openhearted neighbor.Setting: Austin, TXTropes/themes/secondary plot: parenting; characters dealing with grief; family gay MCs

*Shattered Glass by Dani Alexander

MCs: a detective who’s about to get married and has dreamed his whole life of joining the FBI and a waiter he meets one day at a diner who turns out to be a whole lot more than he seems.Setting: Denver, COTropes/themes/secondary plot: age gap romance; murder mystery; lots of drama and angst and situations where characters frequently in danger; a fantastic supporting cast of friends and gay MCs

*King Consort by J.R. Gray

MCs: a prince and heir to the throne of England and a paparazzi photographer with whom, against his better judgment, he shares a one-night stand.Setting: Toronto and LondonTropes/themes/secondary plot: royal/commoner romance; a character dealing with being closeted due to his position (English royalty); fantastic supporting characters (especially the MC’s grandmother, the Queen); gay MCs

*Galley Proof by Eric Arvin

MCs: a fiction writer and the editor of his latest book.Setting: small town America and ItalyTropes/themes/secondary plot: snarky, hilarious first-person narration; a great supporting cast including the MCs mom and best friend/roommate; engaging depictions of small town gay MCs

*Home by William Neale

MCs: an ad exec who returns to his hometown after the death of his father and the man who bullied him in high school, now the deputy chief of police.Setting: small-town Southern AmericanTropes/themes/secondary plot: characters who share a past traumatic relationship (which involved one MC bullying the other); a stalker situation; a return-to-hometown romance; characters dealing with homophobia from various gay MCs

*Love Me Tomorrow by Ethan Day

MCs: an event planner and a paramedic (who also happens to be the brother of his newest, most important client).Setting: Wilde City (fictional)Tropes/themes/secondary plot: a man working to build up his business and the challenges he faces; a love interest in an existing relationship; a cast of endearing supporting gay MCs

*Shaking the Sugar Tree by Nick Wilgus

MCs: a single dad and failed writer struggling to make ends meet and a nurse who recently moved to Mississippi from Boston.Setting: MississippiTropes/themes/secondary plot: parenting; complicated family dynamics; lots of interesting supporting characters; a lot of emotional backstory; characters dealing with various gay MCs, deaf secondary character (the son of one of the MCs)

Daddy, Daddy, and Me by Sean Michael

MCs: a single dad who finds himself raising his biological kids after his best friend, to whom he donated sperm, dies and a young man who just finished his degree in early childhood education and is looking for a nannying job.Setting: OntarioTropes/themes/secondary plot: parenting; fantastic depiction of queer family building; an adorable meet-cute (involving screaming children); almost no gay MCs

by Rick R. Reed

MCs: a man who’s given up on romantic love, so decides to marry a woman and (of course!) his wedding planner.Setting: SeattleTropes/themes/secondary plot: marriage of convenience; forced proximity; various relationships explored besides the main love interest; an arc of self-discovery and affirmation that’s separate from the love gay MCs

*Witches of London-Lars by Aleksandr Voinov

MCs: a pagan man and contractor who’s just joined a new circle of queer witches and a man who has just quit his stressful job and bought an old house in the suburbs, due to his failing health.Setting: LondonTropes/themes/secondary plot: a character with a life-threatening illness; queer witches who practice various forms of paganism; an exploration of spirituality and faith; a lovely portrayal of queer family among the gay MCs

The Alpha’s Claim by Holley Trent

MCs: the alpha of the New York coyote pack and an aspiring actor/waiter.Setting: small town New YorkTropes/themes/secondary plot: a condensed time frame (most of this book takes place over a weekend); coyote shifter pack politics; lots of witty gay MCs

*The Lightning Struck Heart by T.J. KLune

MCs: a wizard’s apprentice and a dreamy knight who spends altogether too much time dating other people.Setting: a fantasy kingdom populated by beautiful queer creaturesTropes/themes/secondary plot: a creative and unique cast of characters and creatures including gay dragons; lovely friendships; a totally fun and wacky fantasy world; dangerous quests; many moments of total laugh-out-loud gay MCs

Chaos Station by Jenn Burke and Kelly Jensen

MCs: a spaceship engineer and an ex-supersoldier, both with traumatic pasts, who are also childhood best friends (and former boyfriends), reunited after being separated for years.Setting: a spaceship roaming the galaxy after a major interplanetary warTropes/themes/secondary plot: second-chance romance, friends-to-lovers, a lot of fast-paced action; a truly wonderful sense of chosen family among the spaceship crew; fascinating aliens; characters dealing with PTSD from a brutal bisexual MC

by Michael Barakiva

MCs: a high school freshman from an Armenian family and the brash, irreverent boy he meets at summer school.Setting: NYCTropes/themes/secondary plot: family dynamics; a coming-out storyline that’s not the center of the book at all; first love; so many amazing food scenes; an exploration of culture and heritage and how important their Armenian identity is to the MCs gay MCs

*Chulito by Charles Rice-Gonzalez

MCs: a teenage boy from the South Bronx and his childhood best friend, whom he distanced himself from when folks around the neighborhood started teasing him for being gay.Setting: NYC (specifically the South Bronx)Tropes/themes/secondary plot: beautiful descriptions of the neighborhood and community; characters dealing with homophobia; friends-to-lovers; nuanced supporting characters; exploration of masculinity and Latinx MCs

*The Love Interest by Cale Dietrich

MCs: two boys raised as “love interests” (forced to compete for the interest of the same girl) by a secret and powerful organization that trains teenage spies.Setting: dystopian AustraliaTropes/themes/secondary plot: fascinating world-building; lots of high-stakes action; a queer and creative twist on the spy novel; lots of angst;  a creepy dystopian gay MCs

Looking for more gay romance novels? Check out 8 of the Best M/M Romances and A (Semi) Comprehensive Guide to LGBTQ Romance. Gay romance novels also appear on this list of must-read YA romances and this list of must-read LGBT fantasy books.

1. Coming Out on Top (2014)

Cara Ellison describes Coming Out on Top as “the -style humour. The art is a little boxy, but clean, crisp and not afraid to show non-pixelated penises in all their glory.

In fact, it’s mainly in its pleasingly forthright, engaged attitude to gay sex that The world needs more depictions of unremarkable but totally awesome gay relationships that aren’t shown to be dark or complicated, while simultaneously not feeling the need to pander to a heterosexual male readership. If you want to play a casual visual novel with assured writing and an impressive varied (albeit occasionally precious!) soundtrack, you’ll want to check out Coming Out on Top — or at least the demo which ends with the irresistible guarantee of “several tightly written, hilarious, and heart-warming stories” and “a metric shit-ton of large, uncensored wang.” Additionally, you can choose whether you or your sex partners have beards or body hair! Ace!