INTERVIEW: This Gay Orc Dating Sim Is All About Inclusivity and Diversity // Vice

Sounds like a little more to expect from a gay orc dating sim than its initial vibe might suggest, doesn’t it? If taken at title value, sure. Gay orcs looking for love. However: There was plainly a lot more going on with Scottish game designer Mitch Alexander‘s first release than was immediately obvious and things that seem like things they kinda aren’t are some of my favourite things. For one, Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim is sexy in its own way, yes, but it also uses its (seemingly unlikely) concept to explore all kinds of issues that had, at the time, just started to normalise as global discussion pieces. Mitch and his gay orc dating sim managed this with a whole heap of heart and personal sensitivity, as became increasingly apparent during our interview for Vice.

It still rocks me to this day that it took the world so long to collectively admit, Hey, I’m not OK and I think it’s because of this, this and this, can we please acknowledge and talk about these things without being written off as simpering fucks, thank you. Empathy, understanding and moral betterment have traditionally come in many unusual forms throughout human history, but I think even old pagan tales and Aesop’s Fables would throw mad respect at limb-different homosexual fantasy monsters navigating the realities of being different and feeling deficient.

You’re not deficient, by the way. You’re badass – because you’re different.

There’s A Gay Orc Dating Sim, And It’s Surprisingly Smart

I have written quite a bit about dating sims in which you hook up with buff dads: the post-apocalyptic one, or the one where you can . Well, I have one more for you, and it’s about dating gay Orcs. Yeah, Orcs.

And Orcs, in the world of Tusks, are super-gay. They have a pride festival called the Ua (pronounced waaaa, a not-so-subtle nod to the Orks of Warhammer), they sometimes have multiple husbands, many wear snug banana hammocks and generally come decked out in classically queer attire. But that’s also not all they are. They have stories and they have religions and they have complex inner lives. It’s tough, after all, for an orc to make a go of it anywhere.

Tusks, a pay-what-you-want dating sim for computer formats, looks to delve into some serious stories, with a curious premise. Some dating sims set themselves apart with a gimmick (like Hatoful Boyfriend, in which you date pigeons) and some with their writing or art. But Tusks does it all—really. It’s not out yet, but there’s a lengthy demo that runs across several in-game days of play, and 60,000 words of dialogue. That’s almost as long as the first Harry Potter novel. And the possibilities here are certainly complex and nuanced, at least to start.

The game opens by asking whether you’re cool with adult content. Well, duh, dating sim, it’s what we’re all here for. But then it asks a more intriguing question, one you might want to spend some time thinking about: Whether you’d like the NPCs of your game to have their own autonomy.

Picking “yes” means that characters will respond to your advances in unpredictable ways, with no gaming the system. No one set of answers will guarantee you romantic or sexual success—y’know, almost as if you were dating one of them troublesome humans. Wanting a more “realistic” run, I went with the autonomous queer orcs.

I was excited, at first. The orcs are diverse and complex. They’ve got histories rife to explore. There’s Ferdag, the rugged warrior with plenty of wins and scars to prove his value. Ror and his pair of husbands lead the group, guiding us on the way to Orkney, the home of his ancestors. The pilgrimage is a return to normalcy after the wild pride festival of Ua. And given that orcs are nomads by nature, the journey marks new beginnings, new friendships and possibly new relationships.

The opening is meant to mirror an experience that developer Mitch Alexander had when he was playing Skyrim. Playing as an orc, at one point he was pulling a group of orcs together to create a new “found family.” The notion is common throughout all kinds of cultures, but is especially important in real-world queer circles. Often, families of LGBTQ folks may disown them when they come out. Tusks flips that and countless other tropes—not necessarily, I think, to deconstruct or comment on them (though that does happen too), but to help establish a new, positive environment to explore these ideas.

When it’s time to head out, one of Ror’s husbands, Malgom, suggested that we call ourselves the Tusken Raiders. Ror and I thought that was too aggressive and violent, though. I suggested “The Green Troubadours,” to settle into a role I’d picked out before settling in to play—a migrant storyteller, looking to start his family. Tusks gives players an enormous amount of latitude to craft who they want to be, particularly as visual novels go. This wasn’t just a role I was given, nor one I came up with for my own headcanon—your motivations are yours, and with NPC autonomy enabled, you can never be sure how everyone else will react.

It conveyed peaceful intentions, too. The Green is a sacred place, the hallowed ground where Ua was held each year. Our name suggested that we were proud of our heritage, but would rather swap tales and connect and celebrate than fight or hurt others. We may be a rough hewn band of burly green men, but we’re a different sort.

Except for the human, Aed. We have a selkie and a grise (a shapeshifting seal and a pig-man, respectively) in our group as well, but we’re all more or less weird. Aed’s a newcomer, a scholar from a human college eager to study Orcish society. He’s excitable, jovial, and thirsty as hell. None of us really know what to do with him. Humans don’t tend to trust orcs, thinking the green folk are “damned” and that they’re “filthy, sinful hedonists out to corrupt.”

Orcs, like the queer community broadly, are outcasts. Like a “questioning” guy showing up to a gay bar, Aed is a mystery. His interest could be earnest, but a lifetime of harassment and mistreatment have the group on-edge when they talk to him. His role is one of genuine curiosity, and his arc (at least the portion that’s playable, currently) definitely follows a pattern that those experienced in the kink or queer communities will immediately recognize: the over-excited newbie. That trait blends with racial undertones to create a genuinely complex guy.

“I figure all of the main characters are different aspects of my identity,” Alexander tells Kotaku.

“From Brocgin, who’s passionate in learning more about his people’s culture to the point it might make him a bit ‘too academic,’ to Sithig, who’s very open about queer sexuality and its importance, to Domnol, who feels like he’s an outsider to it all. The setting is a mythologized version of my home country of Scotland, too, and it’s in a lot of ways a vehicle for my own politics.”

Right now, only the first two days of the total fourteen are fully playable.. That doesn’t sound like much, but there’s a lot going on underneath that. There’s been a lot of effort and care placed into how everyone’s presented, and a conscious effort to work with the “otherness” of orcs in a complex, respectable way, instead of using them as a shorthand for “people of color” as so many fantasy universes have in the past.

But, more than that, Tusks shows an exceptional level of detail that really works as the foundation for a story like this. There’s already shared universe fiction, and plenty of background material, as well as the already substantial amount of in-game writing. There’s still a lot to finish, but the groundwork is here not just for a queer dating simulator, but a heartfelt, inspired epic about the messiness of life.

Plus, who hasn’t wanted to date an orc? They’re gruff, rugged, often with cute tufts of hair all over and delightfully aggressive fangs… oh boy! Right? Right?! Or am I just weird?

The Matrix at the age of nine, Daniel Starkey has been fascinated by the idea of mediated intimacy. They see people as floating through the void of existence, eager to bridge the gap by connecting with others. These days, they’re drawn to looking at the myriad ways people share themselves and what forms that takes.

There's A Gay Orc Dating Sim, And It's Surprisingly Smart

The Pining of the Void: Chapter 1 The Crystal mines

Deep in a Cave was not Where Glush preferred to be. It was damp and muddy, and he really didn’t care for how much washing it took to get the sweat and dirt out of his jumpsuit after a long day in the mine. He placed a chisel in between the rock and the crystal jutting out of it. The crystal shone a yellow light over his tools, thankfully making it very clear where Glush should strike, and he brought his hammer down on the chisel.

For someone reason, nobody’s invented Grindr for orcs yet, but we have the next best thing in Tusks: a dating simulator for big gay green monsters. The game perfectly captures that feeling of being a scary creature, feared by the rest of the world, and then finding your tribe. Even when we feel monstrous, it’s okay when we can be monsters together.

plot? You play as flirty funny Roo, a nymph and ex military, just hired to work in the kitchen for a communal house, mostly inhabited by orcs. Roo is also more than ready to date! (you can also choose the no-relationship ending). Choose between Eda and Dirrong, or another secret route.gameplay? classic visual novel, dialogue choicescharacters? Honestly I loved all the characters, even very secondary ones are absolutely lovely. Also, what you find out about them depends very much on your choices.sadness level? medium highdeath? under cut for spoiler

@ the people arguing my gay orc post, primariily by citing tolkein

lotr is bad and even if it wasn’t like what the fuck would that have to do w/ all the fiction written since then.

Something that rubs me the wrong way, as an orc fan, is people who conflate gender presentation or even racial traits with sexuality and use it to undermine GBP depictions of male orcs.

I mean, for one thing, don’t be shitty about people’s sexuality headcanons in the first place. A headcanon is a headcanon, and everyone is allowed to have one. But even more importantly, don’t act like it’s impossible, unreasonable, or– God forbid– gross when someone depicts a masculine orc as liking other males.

It gets to me the most when it’s Garrosh. Perhaps because he’s my favorite character, or because I headcanon him as gay. But I can’t help but feel like people who get all “but Garrosh is a man, he’s not gay!” have firmly missed the point of his character.

The Pining of the Void: Chapter 1 The Crystal mines

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim Alternatives

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim is described as ‚focuses on a newly-formed family of gay orcs who are travelling from the annual orcish assembly to the Highlands of a semi-mythical Scotland!‘. There are more than 10 alternatives to Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim for a variety of platforms, including Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iPhone. The best alternative is Long Story, which is free. Other great apps like Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim are Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator (Paid), Coming Out on Top (Paid), Lovestruck (Free) and StarFighter: Eclipse (Paid).

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim Alternatives

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim allows the player-character to engage in same-gender relationships with fellow orcs (all of whom appear to be male), while also prioritising NPC autonomy to create fully-realised characters and reduced instances of playersexuality. Consent is highlighted as particularly important in this game, as is the act of talking and spending time with companions in order to engage in relationships with them, rather than the typical model of exchanging gifts or selecting the ‚correct‘ responses to dialogue repeatedly. Tusks currently has a demo available that allows you to embark on the first three in-game days, with the full game yet to be released.

Copyright © 2016-21 Queerly Represent Me Ltd. Trading as Represent Me

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim

There&#039s A Gay Orc Dating Sim, And It&#039s Shockingly Intelligent

I have prepared fairly a bit about dating sims in which you hook up with buff dads: the article-apocalyptic just one, or the just one the place you can also day a manly goldfish. Perfectly, I have just one much more for you, and it is about dating homosexual Orcs. Yeah, Orcs.

And Orcs, in the planet of Tusks, are super-homosexual. They have a delight festival known as the Ua (pronounced waaaa, a not-so-delicate nod to the Orks of Warhammer), they from time to time have various husbands, numerous put on snug banana hammocks and normally arrive decked out in classically queer attire. But which is also not all they are. They have tales and they have religions and they have complicated interior life. It is challenging, following all, for an orc to make a go of it wherever.

Tusks, a pay out-what-you-want dating sim for computer system formats, seems to be to delve into some really serious tales, with a curious premise. Some dating sims set themselves apart with a gimmick (like Hatoful Boyfriend, in which you day pigeons) and some with their creating or artwork. But Tusks does it all—really. It is not out yet, but there is a prolonged demo that runs throughout several in-recreation times of participate in, and 60,000 words of dialogue. That is nearly as long as the initial Harry Potter novel. And the prospects listed here are surely complicated and nuanced, at least to start.

The recreation opens by asking whether or not you are awesome with grownup articles. Perfectly, duh, dating sim, it is what we’re all listed here for. But then it asks a much more intriguing concern, just one you could possibly want to commit some time thinking about: No matter if you’d like the NPCs of your recreation to have their very own autonomy.

Buying “yes” means that figures will respond to your advances in unpredictable ways, with no gaming the technique. No just one set of responses will warranty you passionate or sexual success—y’know, nearly as if you were dating just one of them troublesome human beings. Wanting a much more “realistic” run, I went with the autonomous queer orcs.

I was excited, at initial. The orcs are various and complicated. They’ve obtained histories rife to discover. There’s Ferdag, the rugged warrior with a great deal of wins and scars to prove his price. Ror and his pair of husbands lead the group, guiding us on the way to Orkney, the property of his ancestors. The pilgrimage is a return to normalcy following the wild delight festival of Ua. And supplied that orcs are nomads by mother nature, the journey marks new beginnings, new friendships and potentially new associations.

The opening is intended to mirror an expertise that developer Mitch Alexander had when he was enjoying Skyrim. Taking part in as an orc, at just one place he was pulling a group of orcs together to develop a new “found family members.” The notion is frequent through all varieties of cultures, but is especially vital in serious-planet queer circles. Normally, households of LGBTQ individuals may disown them when they arrive out. Tusks flips that and a great number of other tropes—not necessarily, I assume, to deconstruct or comment on them (while that does take place also), but to aid create a new, beneficial ecosystem to discover these strategies.

When it is time to head out, just one of Ror’s husbands, Malgom, instructed that we call ourselves the Tusken Raiders. Ror and I imagined that was also intense and violent, while. I instructed “The Inexperienced Troubadours,” to settle into a job I’d picked out just before settling in to play—a migrant storyteller, searching to start his family members. Tusks presents gamers an monumental sum of latitude to craft who they want to be, significantly as visible novels go. This was not just a job I was supplied, nor just one I came up with for my very own headcanon—your motivations are yours, and with NPC autonomy enabled, you can under no circumstances be sure how all people else will respond.

It conveyed tranquil intentions, also. The Inexperienced is a sacred put, the hallowed ground the place Ua was held each and every yr. Our title instructed that we were proud of our heritage, but would rather swap tales and connect and rejoice than fight or damage other folks. We may be a tough hewn band of burly green men, but we’re a diverse sort.

Except for the human, Aed. We have a selkie and a grise (a shapeshifting seal and a pig-male, respectively) in our group as very well, but we’re all much more or considerably less strange. Aed’s a newcomer, a scholar from a human university eager to examine Orcish society. He’s excitable, jovial, and thirsty as hell. None of us seriously know what to do with him. Human beings really do not tend to have confidence in orcs, thinking the green people are “damned” and that they are “filthy, sinful hedonists out to corrupt.”

Orcs, like the queer neighborhood broadly, are outcasts. Like a “questioning” guy demonstrating up to a homosexual bar, Aed is a secret. His curiosity could be earnest, but a lifetime of harassment and mistreatment have the group on-edge when they chat to him. His job is just one of authentic curiosity, and his arc (at least the part which is playable, now) undoubtedly follows a sample that these professional in the kink or queer communities will instantly identify: the in excess of-excited newbie. That trait blends with racial undertones to develop a genuinely complicated guy.

“I determine all of the key figures are diverse features of my identification,” Alexander tells Kotaku.

“From Brocgin, who’s passionate in mastering much more about his people’s lifestyle to the place it could possibly make him a bit ‘too tutorial,’ to Sithig, who’s extremely open about queer sexuality and its worth, to Domnol, who feels like he’s an outsider to it all. The placing is a mythologized version of my property nation of Scotland, also, and it is in a whole lot of ways a motor vehicle for my very own politics.”

Proper now, only the initial two times of the complete fourteen are totally playable.. That does not sound like considerably, but there is a whole lot going on underneath that. There’s been a whole lot of effort and hard work and treatment put into how everyone’s introduced, and a conscious effort and hard work to operate with the “otherness” of orcs in a complicated, respectable way, rather of working with them as a shorthand for “people of color” as so numerous fantasy universes have in the earlier.

But, much more than that, Tusks demonstrates an fantastic degree of depth that seriously will work as the foundation for a story like this. There’s now shared universe fiction, and a great deal of history content, as very well as the now sizeable sum of in-recreation creating. There’s nevertheless a whole lot to end, but the groundwork is listed here not just for a queer dating simulator, but a heartfelt, motivated epic about the messiness of lifetime.

Moreover, who has not desired to day an orc? They’re gruff, rugged, often with adorable tufts of hair all in excess of and delightfully intense fangs… oh boy! Proper? Proper?! Or am I just strange?

The Matrix at the age of nine, Daniel Starkey has been fascinated by the strategy of mediated intimacy. They see folks as floating as a result of the void of existence, eager to bridge the gap by connecting with other folks. These times, they are drawn to searching at the myriad ways folks share themselves and what types that usually takes.

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim (Mitch Alexander)

„Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim focuses on a newly-formed family of gay orcs who are travelling from the annual orcish assembly to the Highlands of a semi-mythical Scotland!“ – Author’s description

Best Sims 4 Dating, Love & Romance Mods (All Free)

From fixing toilets to paying overpriced electricity bills, Sims are programmed to suffer real people problems.

As much as it’s fun to play God, it can’t be helped to get attached or even cheer for our lovesick Sims.

Because like all hopeless romantics, who wouldn’t want a happily ever after?

But the journey to a fairytale ending is not all rainbows and sunshine.

Even with all the options and tools to manipulate a perfect love story, there’s only so much we can do to make a Sim relationship work in our favor.

That’s why, in the name of love, it’s time to install some mods and Cupid things up a bit.

Assuming that you want what’s best for your Sims, this list of awesome lovey-dovey mods is a gift that I’m willing to share.

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim Alternatives

Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim is described as ‚focuses on a newly-formed family of gay orcs who are travelling from the annual orcish assembly to the Highlands of a semi-mythical Scotland!‘. There are more than 10 alternatives to Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim for a variety of platforms, including Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iPhone. The best alternative is Long Story, which is free. Other great apps like Tusks: The Orc Dating Sim are Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator (Paid), Coming Out on Top (Paid), Lovestruck (Free) and StarFighter: Eclipse (Paid).

TopGamestagged Dating Sim and Gay (65 results)

Explore games tagged Dating Sim and Gay on · Upload your games to to have them show up here.

Dating sims (or dating simulations) are a video game subgenre of simulation games, usually Japanese, with romantic elements. The most common objective of dating sims is to date, usually choosing from among several characters, and to achieve a romantic relationship.

Dan Starkey

I have written quite a bit about dating sims in which you hook up with buff dads: The post-apocalyptic one, or the one where you can also date a manly goldfish. Well, I have one more for you, and it’s about dating gay Orcs. Yeah, Orcs.

And Orcs, in the world of Tusks, are super-gay. They have a pride festival called the Ua (pronounced waaaa, a not-so-subtle nod to the Orks of Warhammer), they sometimes have multiple husbands, many wear snug banana hammocks and generally come decked out in classically queer attire. But that also isn’t all they are. They have stories and they have religions and they have complex inner lives. It’s tough, after all, for an orc to make a go of it anywhere.

Tusks, a pay-what-you-want dating sim for computer formats, looks to delve into some serious stories, with a curious premise. Some dating sims set themselves apart with a gimmick (such as Hatoful Boyfriend, in which you date pigeons) and some with their writing or art. But Tusks does it all — really. It isn’t out yet, but there’s a lengthy demo that runs across several in-game days of play, and 60,000 words of dialogue. That’s almost as long as the first Harry Potter novel. And the possibilities here are certainly complex and nuanced, at least to start.

The game opens by asking whether you’re cool with adult content. Well, duh, dating sim, it’s what we’re all here for. But then it asks a more intriguing question, one you might want to spend some time thinking about: Whether you’d like the NPCs of your game to have their own autonomy.

Picking “yes” means that characters will respond to your advances in unpredictable ways, with no gaming the system. No one set of answers will guarantee you romantic or sexual success — y’know, almost as if you were dating one of them troublesome humans. Wanting a more “realistic” run, I went with the autonomous queer orcs.

I was excited, at first. The orcs are diverse and complex. They have histories rife to explore. There’s Ferdag, the rugged warrior with plenty of wins and scars to prove his value. Ror and his pair of husbands lead the group, guiding us on the way to Orkney, the home of his ancestors. The pilgrimage is a return to normalcy after the wild pride festival of Ua. And given that orcs are nomads by nature, the journey marks new beginnings, new friendships and possibly new relationships.

The opening is meant to mirror an experience that developer Mitch Alexander had when he was playing Skyrim. Playing as an orc, at one point he was pulling a group of orcs together to create a new “found family”. The notion is common throughout all kinds of cultures, but is especially important in real-world queer circles. Often, families of LGBTQ folks may disown them when they come out. Tusks flips that and countless other tropes — not necessarily, I think, to deconstruct or comment on them (though that does happen too), but to help establish a new, positive environment to explore these ideas.

When it’s time to head out, one of Ror’s husbands, Malgom, suggested that we call ourselves the Tusken Raiders. Ror and I thought that was too aggressive and violent, though. I suggested “The Green Troubadours” to settle into a role I’d picked out before settling in to play — a migrant storyteller, looking to start his family. Tusks gives players an enormous amount of latitude to craft who they want to be, particularly as visual novels go. This wasn’t just a role I was given, nor one I came up with for my own headcanon — your motivations are yours, and with NPC autonomy enabled, you can never be sure how everyone else will react.

It conveyed peaceful intentions, too. The Green is a sacred place, the hallowed ground where Ua was held each year. Our name suggested that we were proud of our heritage, but would rather swap tales and connect and celebrate than fight or hurt others. We may be a rough hewn band of burly green men, but we’re a different sort.

Except for the human, Aed. We have a selkie and a grise (a shapeshifting seal and a pig-man, respectively) in our group as well, but we’re all more or less weird. Aed’s a newcomer, a scholar from a human university eager to study Orcish society. He’s excitable, jovial and thirsty as hell. None of us really know what to do with him. Humans don’t tend to trust orcs, thinking the green folk are “damned” and that they’re “filthy, sinful hedonists out to corrupt”.

Orcs, like the queer community broadly, are outcasts. Like a “questioning” guy showing up to a gay bar, Aed is a mystery. His interest could be earnest, but a lifetime of harassment and mistreatment have the group on-edge when they talk to him. His role is one of genuine curiosity, and his arc (at least the portion that’s playable, currently) definitely follows a pattern that those experienced in the kink or queer communities will immediately recognise: The over-excited newbie. That trait blends with racial undertones to create a genuinely complex guy.

“I figure all of the main characters are different aspects of my identity,” Alexander tells Kotaku.

“From Brocgin, who’s passionate in learning more about his people’s culture to the point it might make him a bit ‘too academic’; to Sithig, who’s very open about queer sexuality and its importance; to Domnol, who feels like he’s an outsider to it all. The setting is a mythologised version of my home country of Scotland, too, and it’s in a lot of ways a vehicle for my own politics.”

Right now, only the first two days of the total 14 are fully playable.. That doesn’t sound like much, but there’s a lot going on underneath that. There’s been a lot of effort and care placed into how everyone’s presented, and a conscious effort to work with the “otherness” of orcs in a complex, respectable way, instead of using them as a shorthand for “people of colour” as so many fantasy universes have in the past.

But, more than that, Tusks shows an exceptional level of detail that really works as the foundation for a story like this. There’s already shared universe fiction, and plenty of background material, as well as the already substantial amount of in-game writing. There’s still a lot to finish, but the groundwork is here not just for a queer dating simulator, but a heartfelt, inspired epic about the messiness of life.

Plus, who hasn’t wanted to date an orc? They’re gruff, rugged, often with cute tufts of hair all over and delightfully aggressive fangs… oh boy! Right? Right?! Or am I just weird?

9. SimDa Dating App

Dating apps like Tinder or Bumble don’t cater to a Sim demographic. But that only motivated LittleMsSam to create an in-game counterpart.

Meet SimDa, a one-stop-shop dating app for casual hookups, blind dates, and I-want-commitment dates.

Similar to how we exploit Tinder on-the-go, this mod can be accessed via your Sim’s phone.

You won’t be able to swipe left or right. But you can still choose a date from a roster of emotionally available and unavailable Sims.

1. Road to Romance

Love can indeed find a way, when you have the right mod at hand!

Lumpinou’s Road to Romance is loaded with more than a dozen new romantic interactions and features to keep you busy from getting a love life of your own.

From confessing to never having WooHoo’d to talking about exes, this mod will introduce Sims to the growing pains of a new and maturing relationship.

It also enables online dating, couple’s counseling, and other modern dating practices to keep up with the times. Good and bad, of course.

Ground your Sims in reality and enjoy playing Cupid from the first date to endgame.