About

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in Manhattan. The Stonewall Uprising was a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. In the United States the last Sunday in June was initially celebrated as „Gay Pride Day,“ but the actual day was flexible. In major cities across the nation the „day“ soon grew to encompass a month-long series of events. Today, celebrations include pride parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia and concerts, and LGBTQ Pride Month events attract millions of participants around the world. Memorials are held during this month for those members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS. The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally.

In 1994, a coalition of education-based organizations in the United States designated October as LGBT History Month. In 1995, a resolution passed by the General Assembly of the National Education Association included LGBT History Month within a list of commemorative months. National Coming Out Day (October 11), as well as the first „March on Washington“ in 1979, are commemorated in the LGBTQ community during LGBT History Month.

New York Pride (aka Gay Pride) 2021

Die New York Pride (auch bekannt als Gay Pride) findet einmal im Jahr statt. Die Veranstaltung feiert die Lesben, Schwulen, Bisexuellen und Transgender Gemeinschaft in New York, kurz LGBT+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender). Die Parade, die auch Pride Parade genannt wird, ist wahrscheinlich das bekannteste Event von allen Pride Veranstaltungen in New York.

Die Pride Parade durchquert die Fifth Avenue und endet im Greenwich Village. Die Parade führt auch entlang des Stonewall Inn, wo 1969 die Stonewall Riots stattfanden. Die Unruhen werden als das wichtigste Ereignis gesehen, das zur homosexuellen Emanzipationsbewegung geführt hat und dazu beitrug die Rechte von Schwulen und Lesben in den Vereinigten Staaten zu stärken.

New York Pride (aka Gay Pride) 2021

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride at 50, a Legacy of Celebratory Protest

In February 1979, Sue Davis and Shirley Wilson were arrested by San Francisco Police after leaving Amelia’s, a now closed San Francisco lesbian bar. The two women were harassed, strip searched, beaten and held overnight without charge. A community meeting of over 100 women held in the following weeks resulted in the formation of Lesbians Against Police Violence (LAPV). LAPV organized for police abolition and highlighted a parallel between colonial violence and discriminatory policing of people of color, poor people, immigrants and LGBT people.[2]

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride at 50, a Legacy of Celebratory Protest

50th Anniversary of Annual LGBTQ+ Pride Traditions

June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist. Looking through the Lili Vincenz and Frank Kameny Papers in the Manuscript Reading Room, researchers can find planning documents, correspondence, flyers, ephemera and more from the very first Pride marches in 1970. This, the very first U.S. Gay Pride Week and March, was meant to give the community a chance to gather together to, „…commemorate the Christopher Street Uprisings of last summer in which thousands of homosexuals went to the streets to demonstrate against centuries of government hostility to employment and housing discrimination, Mafia control of Gay bars, and anti-Homosexual laws“ (Christopher Street Liberation Day Committee Fliers, Franklin Kameny Papers). The concept behind the initial Pride march came from members of the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (E.R.C.H.O), who had been organizing an annual July 4th demonstration (1965-1969) known as the „Reminder Day Pickets,“ at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. At the E.R.C.H.O Conference in November 1969, the 13 homophile organizations in attendance voted to pass a resolution to organize a National annual demonstration, to be called Christopher Street Liberation Day.

As members of the Mattachine Society of Washington, Frank Kameny and Lilli Vincenz participated in the discussion, planning, and promotion of the first Pride along with activists in New York City and other homophile groups belonging to E.R.C.H.O.

By all estimates, there were upwards of 3-5,000 marchers at the inaugural Pride in New York City, and today NYC marchers number in the millions. Since 1970, LGBTQ+ people have continued to gather together in June to march with Pride and demonstrate for equal rights.

Watch documentary footage of the first Pride march, Gay and Proud, a documentary by activist Lilli Vincenz:

50th Anniversary of Annual LGBTQ+ Pride Traditions

Executive and Legislative Documents

The Law Library of Congress has compiled guides to commemorative observations, including a comprehensive inventory of the Public Laws, Presidential Proclamations and congressional resolutions related to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Transgender and Queer Pride Month.

Executive and Legislative Documents

Welcome from the Library of Congress

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month. This month-long celebration demonstrates how LGBTQ Americans have strengthened our country, by using their talent and creativity to help create awareness and goodwill. June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride March in New York City was held on June 28, 1970, on the one year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. More

The legacy of LGBTQ individuals is being discovered by interested readers and seasoned researchers perusing unparalleled global collections. The acquisition of historic material and the ongoing program of copyright deposits will continue to enrich the Library’s holdings of LGBTQ materials.

The collections of the Library of Congress contain many books, posters, sound recordings, manuscripts and other material produced by, about and for the LGBTQ community. The contributions of this community are preserved as part of our nation’s history, and include noted artistic works, musical compositions and contemporary novels. The Library’s American collections range from the iconic poetry of Walt Whitman through the manuscripts of the founder of LGBTQ activism in Washington, D.C., Frank Kameny.

The Library of Congress is the largest single repository of world knowledge in a single place. In addition to having the mission of acquiring and preserving this exponentially growing body of knowledge, the Library is responsible for making all of its vast collection accessible to all.

Abstract

This article describes the population participating in the LGBT Pride Parade in Santiago, Chile, from discrimination and victimization standpoints. The sample consisted of 488 subjects older than 18 years (M = 25.1), who were interviewed during the 2007 event. For this purpose, a questionnaire from the Latin American Centre of Sexuality and Human Rights (CLAM) was adapted and administered. Approximately 35% of respondents reported having experimented school, religious, or neighborhood discrimination. The more discriminated are transgender people. Approximately three fourths of respondents reported experiencing ridicule and almost 60% reported experiencing insults or threats. Transgender were significantly more likely than gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals to experience discrimination or victimization events. Finally, the parade acquired an important social and political character in the context of a clearly homophobic society.

There’s so much more to Pride than a parade.

The Pride parades and week of events leading up to them that we know today have a rich and often untold history. From the creation and meaning of the rainbow flag, to the modern day acknowledgement of LGBT Pride Month from political leaders, here are 10 awesome facts about Pride that may have flown under your radar. Photo via WikiCommons.

1) The event that inspired the Pride parades we know now was a march to commemorate the Stonewall Riots.

In 1970, a year after the Stonewall Inn rebellion thousands of LGBT New Yorkers gathered for the Christopher Street Liberation Day (CSLD) March along Sixth Avenue from Greenwich Village to Central Park, chanting, “Say it clear, say it loud! Gay is good, gay is proud!” The success of the CSLD March inspired local organizers across the United States and around the globe to start their own LGBT marches.

At the 1973 CSLD march, transgender activist Sylvia Rivera called out transphobia in an epic speech, proving that transgender people have been part of our community’s activism forever.

In an essay for The Village Voice, Fred Sargeant recounted his experience at the CSLD March: „This was long before anyone had heard of a “Gay Pride March.” Back then, it took a new sense of audacity and courage to take that giant step into the streets of Midtown Manhattan. […] There were no floats, no music, no boys in briefs. The cops turned their backs on us to convey their disdain, but the masses of people kept carrying signs and banners, chanting and waving to surprised onlookers.“ Photo via YouTube.

3) Every color of the rainbow flag means something.

Have you ever wondered what the rainbow gay pride flag flown at Pride parades means? The original flag few at the Gay Freedom Day Parade in San Francisco in 1978, and was designed by Gilbert Baker. Thirty volunteers hand-dyed and stitched the first two flags for the parade.

Baker assigned different meanings to each color. Hot pink represents sexuality. Red represents life. Orange represents healing. Yellow represents sunlight. Green represents nature. Turquoise represents magic and art. Indigo represents serenity and harmony. Violet represents spirit. Stripes were eventually dropped from the design for mass production, resulting in the six-stripe flag that’s popular today. Photo via Wikipedia.

4) For a period of time, the world’s largest flag was super gay.

For the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in 1994, Gilbert Baker was commissioned to make the world’s largest rainbow flag. The flag used the six-stripe design that’s popular today, and measured thirty feet wide. The Guinness Book of World Records confirmed it as the largest flag in the world, but it has since lost the title. Baker made another giant rainbow flag in 2003 that stretched a mile and a quarter across Key West, Florida. Photo via YouTube.

5) The first Dyke March wasn’t until 1993.

While the first U.S. Pride event can be traced back to 1970, the first Dyke March didn’t happen for 23 more years. Dyke Marches, which usually happen on the eve of Pride parades, were first organized by the radical activist group, The Lesbian Avengers.

Frustrated by lesbian invisibility, The Lesbian Avengers organized direct action protests. On April 24, 1993, the evening before the LGBT Pride March on Washington, D.C., 20,000 women marched to the White House where a dozen Lesbian Avengers ate fire. Photo via YouTube.

6) Pride wasn’t always called Pride.

Pride parades weren’t always called Pride parades. When early Pride events started, they were more militant, and were more often referred to as marches. “Gay Liberation” or “Gay Freedom” were more common names for those marches. As militancy slowly decreased in the 1980s and 1990s, events moved toward a parade-structure and the “Pride” language. The photo above is from the 1983 Lesbian Strength March in London, where militant language is being used alongside the language we commonly see at Pride parades today. Photo via WikiCommons.

7) Pride Month has only been acknowledged by two U.S. presidents.

While LGBT people have been claiming June as Pride Month for decades, only two U.S. presidents have officially acknowledged June as LGBT Pride Month. President Bill Clinton was the first to recognize Pride Month in 1999. George W. Bush (surprise!) never issued a proclamation commemorating LGBT Pride.

President Barack Obama has issued an official proclamation declaring June Pride Month since 2009. In 2015, he stated in his proclamation: “All people deserve to live with dignity and respect, free from fear and violence, and protected against discrimination, regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation. During Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, we celebrate the proud legacy LGBT individuals have woven into the fabric of our Nation, we honor those who have fought to perfect our Union, and we continue our work to build a society where every child grows up knowing that their country supports them, is proud of them, and has a place for them exactly as they are.” Photo via WikiCommons.

8) The Pentagon has an LGBT Pride event.

Just don’t expect floats or celebrity appearances at The Pentagon’s Pride. The Pentagon’s first Pride event was held in 2012. Gay members of the military talked about the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” and the importance of being able to discuss their families and loved ones with fellow servicemen and women. Photo via YouTube.

9) The largest Pride Parade is the world is in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Sao Paulo Gay Pride Parade started with a humble 2,000 attendees in 1997, but has since grown to millions. In 2006, the Guinness Book of World Records named Sao Paulo’s parade the largest Gay Pride celebration in the world, with 2.5 million attendees. They haven’t lost that title since. Other major Pride parades aren’t too far behind, with New York at roughly 2 million participants, and San Francisco at roughly 1.7 million. Photo via WikiCommons.

10) Companies drop a lot of dough on Pride events.

At some point, you may have wondered if you were at a Pride parade or an Absolut Vodka parade. With rising LGBT acceptance, and a lot of LGBT dollars at stake, companies are less afraid to cater to the LGBT consumer. Some of the largest corporate sponsors are Wells Fargo, Macy’s, and TD Bank (who spend approximately $1 million annually on parades).

For many Pride organizers, corporate sponsorship means they can continue hosting a massive, free weeklong festival. Some former Pride participants have started organizing their own events as an alternative to corporate sponsored Pride parades. Photo via Flickr.

Was kann man während der NYC Pride in New York machen?

Es gibt verschiedene Aktivitäten, die während der NYC Pride in New York stattfinden. Die Einkünfte der Events gehen in der Regel an die New York LGBT+ Gemeinschaft und die Pride Veranstaltungen. Die NYC Pride wird auch oft als Gay Pride bezeichnet, das Festival als Pride Week. In der Pride Week werden viele Veranstaltungen organisiert. Hier finden Sie eine kleine Auswahl:

Pride Tour in New York

Wenn Sie mehr über die LGBT Bewegung in New York lernen möchten, ist diese Tour das Richtige für Sie. Der Leiter der Tour wird Ihnen alles zu den Stonewall Unruhen und zum historischen Hintergrund erklären, Sie sehen das Stonewall Inn und es geht zu mehreren Plätzen in New York, die für die LGBT Gemeinschaft wichtig sind.

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Eine Broadway Show ist ein Muss, wenn Sie in New York sind!

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride at 50, a Legacy of Celebratory Protest

Many 2020 LGBT Pride celebrations have been curtailed by COVID-19 social distancing precautions and official events marking the fiftieth anniversary of Pride canceled or moved online. In support of the ongoing national uprisings against police violence and systemic racism, some annual June Pride parades will be replaced with independently organized street protests. These independent actions may more closely approximate the tactics and demands of the foundational events that are commemorated annually at Pride, the 1966 San Francisco Compton’s Cafeteria and 1969 New York Stonewall Inn riots. Both protests, led by Black trans women, demanded an end to police violence and enforcement of discriminatory public decency laws.[1] The history of Pride includes many examples of this annual celebration as a venue of LGBT demands for justice.

Mission

The mission of Twin Cities Pride is to empower every LGBTQ+ person to live as their true self. We envision a future where all LGBTQ+ people are valued and celebrated for who they are.

Twin Cities Pride 2021 East Hennepin Ave, Suite 402-7

Abstract

This article describes the population participating in the LGBT Pride Parade in Santiago, Chile, from discrimination and victimization standpoints. The sample consisted of 488 subjects older than 18 years (M = 25.1), who were interviewed during the 2007 event. For this purpose, a questionnaire from the Latin American Centre of Sexuality and Human Rights (CLAM) was adapted and administered. Approximately 35% of respondents reported having experimented school, religious, or neighborhood discrimination. The more discriminated are transgender people. Approximately three fourths of respondents reported experiencing ridicule and almost 60% reported experiencing insults or threats. Transgender were significantly more likely than gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals to experience discrimination or victimization events. Finally, the parade acquired an important social and political character in the context of a clearly homophobic society.

LGBTQ – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Cure – Community conducted a Pride Parade in the capital of Madhya Pradesh on July 15, 2018, seeking the same rights and freedom. They demanded to remove section 377 of Indian penal code according to which `Whoever voluntarily makes physical sexual intercourse against the order of nature will be punished with imprisonment for any man, woman imprisonment for life, or for a term of up to ten years, and it will also be liable for fines.`

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Pride Island

Pride Island ist eine große Livemusik Party, bei der verschiedene DJs und Künstler auftreten. Es ist zugleich die größte jährliche Benefizveranstaltung von NYC Pride. Das Mindestalter beträgt 21 Jahre. Die Veranstaltung findet vom 26. bis zum 28. Juni 2020 von 14:00 bis 22:00 Uhr am Hudson River Park, Pier 97 statt.

Wenn Sie danach noch Energie übrig haben, können Sie in einem der vielen Gayclubs weiterfeiern oder den Abend auf einer der Rooftop Bars in New York ausklingen lassen.

Related Posts

In May 1979, anticipating lenient sentencing of former San Francisco Police Officer and City Supervisor Dan White, LAPV organized a march and rally on San Francisco City Hall. Mr. White had used his police department issued firearm to kill Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, one of the first openly gay elected officials in the United States. He was found guilty only of manslaughter and sentenced to a seven-year prison term. Protesters responded by overturning and lighting fire to several police vehicles and breaking windows at City Hall.[3]

The police retaliated. Hours after the City Hall protesters dispersed, police indiscriminately arrested and beat people presumed to be gay and lesbian, including raiding and vandalizing Elephant Walk, a Castro neighborhood gay bar.[4] The violent police response led to the hospitalization of over 100 people in what is now known as the White Night riots. Later, a grand jury was formed by then San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein to identify and criminalize protest participants.

LAPV described the grand jury as a political tool to shift blame for the White Night riots from police to LGBT protesters. LAPV organized against the grand jury by providing free legal defense education. At the June 1979 San Francisco Gay Freedom Day parade, as San Francisco LGBT Pride was referred until 1995, LAPV marched with a large contingent demanding amnesty for demonstrators at the White Night riots.

During this fiftieth year, LGBT Pride remains a holiday of celebration and a demand for justice.

View the California Historical Society’s related collections:

Mitzi Hawkins, MD is a research Fellow in the Departments of Medicine and Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at UCSF.

[1]Transgender History. Seal Studies. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press : Distributed by Publishers Group West.

[2] Hanhardt, Christina B. 2013. Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence. Perverse Modernities. Durham: Duke University Press.

[3] Jochild, Maggie. 2008. “The White Night Riot, 21 May 1979 and Lesbians Against Police Violence.” Meta Watershed (blog). May 21, 2008. .

[4]Bay Area Reporter. 1979. “Gays Riot. Why – Why Not?,” May 24, 1979.

LGBTQ+ Biographies & True Stories

Memoirs from famous LGBTQ+ stars, true stories from LGBTQ+ historical figures and inspirational gender diverse people.

You can find us on the Second Floor of the World Famous Afflecks in Manchester city centre.

© 2021 Pride Shop is a trading name of Make Up Or Break Up Limited. Registered in England & Wales with Company Number 11480405. VAT Number GB 318 974 856.

Pride Festival

Starting in 1972 as a small picnic in Loring Park, this program has become the premiere celebration of the Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender community, attracting over 400,000 visitors. Wide-ranging attractions attest to the diversity of the festival. Highlights include four stages of live entertainment, Living Well Park, Wedding Ceremony Grounds, Jean Tretter GLBT History Pavilion, Children & Families Area, Teen Scene, School Zone, Pet Central, Pride in Concert, and over 400 vendors and exhibitors. 2020’s theme was #StayProud. There are so many issues affecting our whole community that marriage equality doesn’t fix. Queer People of Color, especially Trans People of Color, often struggle just to survive every day. Transgender Persons are often harassed because of who they are. Bisexual Persons are often told to make up their minds. We could go on and is meant to be a safe space for everyone to come together and celebrate who they are and who they love. #StayProud!

Ashley Rukes GLBT Pride Parade

Ashley Rukes GLBT Pride Parade on Sunday morning of Pride weekend attracts well over 150,000 people, making it the largest parade of any kind in the five-state area and our second largest program activity. Beginning in 1972 as a small march, the Parade grew under the leadership of transgender activist Ashley Rukes in the 1990s. The parade was named in her honor after her untimely passing. Over 125 units of floats and marchers, representing every color and stripe of the GLBT rainbow family, parade down Hennepin Avenue into Loring Park. While not as racy as Pride Parades in some cities, viewers are entertained by floats, marching bands, Drag Queens and many others along the route.

View allAll Photos Tagged lesbian gay bisexual transgender

Together we stand united and proud against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and everyone in the community, for equality, acceptance, happiness and the right to be who we truly are. ????❤️

I love you my husband! <3

Together we stand united and proud against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and everyone in the community, for equality, acceptance, happiness and the right to be who we truly are. ????❤️

I love you my husband! <3

„May 1989 saw the creation of Keith Haring’s bathroom mural “Once Upon a Time”. He was 31 at the time and this was his last major mural before his untimely death in February 1990 of AIDS-related complications. The piece was created for “The Center Show,” a celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, largely thought of as the start of the Gay Liberation and LGBT Rights movement. The Center Show called upon LGBT artists to create site-specific works of art in the building commonly called “The Center” (now called The Center: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center). Haring chose to create his provocative work in the second floor men’s bathroom“.

„May 1989 saw the creation of Keith Haring’s bathroom mural “Once Upon a Time”. He was 31 at the time and this was his last major mural before his untimely death in February 1990 of AIDS-related complications. The piece was created for “The Center Show,” a celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, largely thought of as the start of the Gay Liberation and LGBT Rights movement. The Center Show called upon LGBT artists to create site-specific works of art in the building commonly called “The Center” (now called The Center: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center). Haring chose to create his provocative work in the second floor men’s bathroom“.

Pride parades for the LGBT community (also known as gay pride parades, pride events and pride festivals) are events celebrating lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender culture. The events also at times serve as demonstrations for legal rights such as same-sex marriage. Most pride events occur annually and many take place around June to commemorate the Stonewall riots, a pivotal moment in the modern LGBT rights movement.

Early on the morning of Saturday, 28 June 1969, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning persons rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, NYC . The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar which catered to an assortment of patrons, but which was popular with the most marginalized people in the gay community: transvestites, transgender people, effeminate young men, hustlers, and homeless youth. The Stonewall riots are generally considered to be the beginning of the modern gay rights movement, as it was the first time in modern history that a significant body of LGBT people resisted arrest.

Pride parades for the LGBT community (also known as gay pride parades, pride events and pride festivals) are events celebrating lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender culture. The events also at times serve as demonstrations for legal rights such as same-sex marriage. Most pride events occur annually and many take place around June to commemorate the Stonewall riots, a pivotal moment in the modern LGBT rights movement.

Early on the morning of Saturday, 28 June 1969, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning persons rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, NYC . The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar which catered to an assortment of patrons, but which was popular with the most marginalized people in the gay community: transvestites, transgender people, effeminate young men, hustlers, and homeless youth. The Stonewall riots are generally considered to be the beginning of the modern gay rights movement, as it was the first time in modern history that a significant body of LGBT people resisted arrest.

mixed media collage made for nyabn combining well-know retro 60’s image with photo of a current (2000-somthing) graffiti-art wall in NYC urging all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people to vote in USA Elections

The 2010 Phoenix Gay Pride Parade on Saturday, April 17.

Our contribution for the PULSE Fundraiser (Fundraiser for the victims of the Orlando nightclub shooting): The Window of Hope is a wall decoration. It will be available in brown or in white wood. Both versions come with prefilled photographs (shown here) or in a version where own pictures can be placed in. The Window of Hope has 5 LI (Dimensions 1.2 x 0.12 x 1.9 meters)

100% will become donated to / Equality Florida, the state’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization.

The PULSE Fundraiser will open June 28th and will last two weeks (closing on July 12th)

Our contribution for the PULSE Fundraiser (Fundraiser for the victims of the Orlando nightclub shooting): The Window of Hope is a wall decoration. It will be available in brown or in white wood. Both versions come with prefilled photographs (shown here) or in a version where own pictures can be placed in. The Window of Hope has 5 LI (Dimensions 1.2 x 0.12 x 1.9 meters)

100% will become donated to / Equality Florida, the state’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization.

The PULSE Fundraiser will open June 28th and will last two weeks (closing on July 12th)

OUTstanding Amarillo promotes empowerment and acceptance of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender population of the Texas Panhandle by initiating dialogue, providing education, and creating support systems with the ultimate goal of social change.

OUTstanding Amarillo promotes empowerment and acceptance of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender population of the Texas Panhandle by initiating dialogue, providing education, and creating support systems with the ultimate goal of social change.

OUTstanding Amarillo promotes empowerment and acceptance of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender population of the Texas Panhandle by initiating dialogue, providing education, and creating support systems with the ultimate goal of social change.

OUTstanding Amarillo promotes empowerment and acceptance of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender population of the Texas Panhandle by initiating dialogue, providing education, and creating support systems with the ultimate goal of social change.

Capital Pride Festival Washington DC June 14th 2009 . GLBT gay lesbian bisexual transgender pride event on Pennsylvania Ave right in front of the The United States Capitol building in NW Washington DC.

Capital Pride Festival Washington DC June 14th 2009 . GLBT gay lesbian bisexual transgender pride event on Pennsylvania Ave right in front of the The United States Capitol building in NW Washington DC.

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BNO January 2017, managed to brave the outside for a few minutes

Young people from GYRO have responded to the Keith Haring exhibition through interactive workshops.

The work presented in Tate Exchange explores the various ways that young LGBTQ+ people express themselves. The young people wanted to share that their LGBTQ+ identities are very important to them and that they do not exist in isolation from the rest of their identity.

Visitors to Tate Exchange will be encouraged to explore their own identities through a series of activities.

Interesting images, but I didn’t know what LGBTQ+ stood for.

People often use LGBTQ+ to mean all of the communities included in the “LGBTTTQQIAA”:

LGBTQ is the more commonly used term in the community; possibly because it is more user friendly ————— your not joking there.

———– And I thought we were all just people, turns out to be a whole lot more complicated.

I wonder why people want to be classified at all? What’s wrong with just being you ?

Well I guess that these days everybody has a right to be whatever they want to be; but I can see it creating all sorts of problems that we as a society may not want to face.

Young people from GYRO have responded to the Keith Haring exhibition through interactive workshops.

The work presented in Tate Exchange explores the various ways that young LGBTQ+ people express themselves. The young people wanted to share that their LGBTQ+ identities are very important to them and that they do not exist in isolation from the rest of their identity.

Visitors to Tate Exchange will be encouraged to explore their own identities through a series of activities.

Interesting images, but I didn’t know what LGBTQ+ stood for.

People often use LGBTQ+ to mean all of the communities included in the “LGBTTTQQIAA”:

LGBTQ is the more commonly used term in the community; possibly because it is more user friendly ————— your not joking there.

———– And I thought we were all just people, turns out to be a whole lot more complicated.

I wonder why people want to be classified at all? What’s wrong with just being you ?

Well I guess that these days everybody has a right to be whatever they want to be; but I can see it creating all sorts of problems that we as a society may not want to face.

Facebook ♦ Twitter ♦ Pinterest ♦ Instagram ♦ 500px ♦ Website

Facebook ♦ Twitter ♦ Pinterest ♦ Instagram ♦ 500px ♦ Website

Get Bisexual, lesbian, gay,trans, threesome, LGBT, kinky couples, swingers dating app – Bimeet

Get Bisexual, lesbian, gay,trans, threesome, LGBT, kinky couples, swingers dating app – Bimeet

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Facebook ♦ Twitter ♦ Pinterest ♦ Instagram ♦ 500px ♦ Website

Facebook ♦ Twitter ♦ Pinterest ♦ Instagram ♦ 500px ♦ Website

Capital Pride Festival Washington DC June 14th 2009 . GLBT gay lesbian bisexual transgender pride event on Pennsylvania Ave right in front of the The United States Capitol building in NW Washington DC.

Capital Pride Festival Washington DC June 14th 2009 . GLBT gay lesbian bisexual transgender pride event on Pennsylvania Ave right in front of the The United States Capitol building in NW Washington DC.

Get Bisexual, lesbian, gay,trans, threesome, LGBT, kinky couples, swingers dating app – Bimeet

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