Everest 1953: First Footsteps – Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay

National Geographic revisits the 1953 British summit to Everest when the first people stood atop the world’s highest mountain.

Excerpted From „50 Years on Everest,“ by Contributing Editor David Roberts, National Geographic Adventure, April 2003

By today’s standards, the 1953 British expedition, under the military-style leadership of Sir John Hunt, was massive in the extreme, but in an oddly bottom-heavy way: 350 porters, 20 Sherpas, and tons of supplies to support a vanguard of only ten climbers. „Our climbers were all chosen as potential summiters,“ recalls George Band, 73, who was one of the party. Fifty years later, Band’s memory of the campaign remains undimmed. „The basic plan was for two summit attempts, each by a pair of climbers, with a possible third assault if necessary. On such expeditions the leader tends to designate the summit pairs quite late during the expedition, when he sees how everybody is performing.“ Anxiety over who is chosen for the summit team would be a hallmark of major Everest expeditions for decades to come. But never again would the stakes be quite so high.

By the spring of 1953, the ascent of the world’s highest mountain was beginning to seem inevitable. First attempted in 1921 by the British, Everest had repulsed at least ten major expeditions and two lunatic solo attempts. With the 1950 discovery of a southern approach to the mountain in newly opened Nepal, and the first ascent of the treacherous Khumbu Icefall the following year, what would come to be known by the 1990s as the „yellow brick road“ to the summit had been identified.

At first it seemed the Swiss would claim the prize. In 1952 a strong Swiss team that included legendary alpinist Raymond Lambert had pioneered the route up the steep Lhotse Face and reached the South Col. From that high, broad saddle, Lambert and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay then pushed all the way to 28,210 feet (8,598 meters) on the Southeast Ridge before turning back—probably as high as anyone had ever stood on Earth.

Now the British were determined to bring every possible advantage to their spring 1953 offensive—including hiring Tenzing, 38, as their lead Sherpa, or sirdar. Earlier British expeditions, though impressive in their accomplishments, were often charmingly informal in style. Hunt’s intricately planned assault, on the other hand, was all business. „You get there fastest with the mostest,“ observes mountaineering pundit Ken Wilson. „You have a military leader who is totally in tune with that philosophy, and you don’t dink around in an amateur sort of clubby way.“

From the start, the 33-year-old beekeeper Edmund Hillary (not yet Sir Edmund) was a strong contender for one of the summit slots. „It was his fourth Himalayan expedition in just over two years and he was at the peak of fitness,“ Band says. The heavily glaciated peaks of his native New Zealand had proved a perfect training ground for the Himalaya. Hillary earned respect early in the expedition by leading the team that forced a route through the Khumbu Icefall. „A sleeves-rolled-up, get-things-done man,“ Wilson calls him.

Still, logistical snafus, the failure of a number of stalwarts to acclimatize, and problems with some of the experimental oxygen sets stalled the expedition badly. The team took a troubling 12 days to retrace the Swiss route on the Lhotse Face (in part, perhaps, because the British were not as experienced on difficult ice). In despair, Hunt began to wonder whether his party would even reach the South Col.

The expedition finally gained the col—the vital staging area for a summit push—on May 21. This was late enough to be worrisome, for the monsoon, whose heavy snows would prohibit climbing, could arrive as early as June 1.

Because they became the first men to reach the summit of Everest, Hillary and Tenzing would earn a celebrity that has scarcely faded in 50 years. Who today remembers Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans? Yet Hunt’s plan called for Bourdillon, a former president of the Oxford Mountaineering Club, and Evans, a brain surgeon, to make the first summit bid.

Despite a relatively late start and problems with Evans’s oxygen set, Bourdillon and Evans crested the South Summit—at 28,700 feet (8,748 meters), only 330 feet (101 meters) short of the top—by 1 p.m. on May 26. But Evans was exhausted, and both men knew they would run out of oxygen if they went on. They agreed to turn back. Says Michael Westmacott, Bourdillon’s closest friend on the 1953 team: „It was a decision Tom always regretted.“

So it was that three days later Hillary and Tenzing set out for the top. Their pairing was hardly an accident. „It had always been Hunt’s intention, if feasible, to include a Sherpa in one of the summit teams, as a way of recognizing their invaluable contribution to the success of these expeditions,“ Band says. „Tenzing had already proved he had summit potential by his performance the previous year with Lambert.

In fact, he had been at least 4,000 feet (1,219 meters) higher than any of us!“ Indeed, Tenzing (who died in 1986) was the most experienced Everest veteran alive, having participated in six previous attempts on the mountain dating all the way back to 1935. (To those who criticize the practice of leading paying clients on Everest, Himalayan Experience founder and longtime Everest guide Russell Brice has a barbed, half-joking response: „You know who the first guided client on Everest was? Ed Hillary.“)

But Hillary, too, had proved his worth, seeming to grow stronger as the expedition progressed. Band notes that Hillary had also realized what a powerful team he and Tenzing would make. „During the expedition, with hindsight, one can see that he made a deliberate effort to develop a good partnership with Tenzing,“ Band says. „It paid off. Hillary and Tenzing were the logical second party for the summit. But this was not determined at the outset, only during the course of the expedition as it evolved.“

With an earlier start from a higher camp than Bourdillon and Evans’s, Tenzing and Hillary reached the South Summit by 9 a.m. But the difficulties were far from over. After the South Summit, the ridge takes a slight dip before rising abruptly in a rocky spur some 40 feet (12 meters) high just before the true summit. Scraping at the snow with his ax, Hillary chimneyed between the rock pillar and an adjacent ridge of ice to surmount this daunting obstacle, later to be known as the Hillary Step. The pair reached the highest point on Earth at 11:30 a.m. on May 29.

The men shook hands, as Hillary later wrote, „in good Anglo-Saxon fashion,“ but then Tenzing clasped his partner in his arms and pounded him on the back. The pair spent only 15 minutes on top.  „Inevitably my thoughts turned to Mallory and Irvine,“ Hillary wrote, referring to the two British climbers who had vanished high on Everest’s Northeast Ridge in 1924. „With little hope I looked around for some sign that they had reached the summit, but could see nothing.“

As the two men made their way back down, the first climber they met was teammate George Lowe, also a New Zealander. Hillary’s legendary greeting: „Well, George, we knocked the bastard off!“

Their fame was spreading even as Hillary and Tenzing left the mountain. „When we came out toward Kathmandu, there was a very strong political feeling, particularly among the Indian and Nepalese press, who very much wanted to be assured that Tenzing was first,“ Sir Edmund recalls today. „That would indicate that Nepalese and Indian climbers were at least as good as foreign climbers. We felt quite uncomfortable with this at the time. John Hunt, Tenzing, and I had a little meeting. We agreed not to tell who stepped on the summit first.

„To a mountaineer, it’s of no great consequence who actually sets foot first. Often the one who puts more into the climb steps back and lets his partner stand on top first.“ The pair’s pact stood until years later, when Tenzing revealed in his autobiography, Tiger of the Snows, that Hillary had in fact preceded him.

Neither man anticipated how much, in the wake of their success, the appeal of that patch of snow more than five miles in the sky would grow. „Both Tenzing and I thought that once we’d climbed the mountain, it was unlikely anyone would ever make another attempt,“ Sir Edmund admits today. „We couldn’t have been more wrong.“

Die Erstbesteigung des Mount Everest

Es ist der 29. Mai 1953, Ortszeit 11:30 Uhr, als der neuseeländische Imker Edmund Hillary und sein Kollege, der Nepalese Tenzing Norgay, einen letzten Schritt auf einem Weg machen, der bis dahin bereits über 30 Jahre gedauert hatte. Hillary zuerst, so schreibt es später Norgay in seiner Biografie „Tiger of the Snows”, danach er selbst, setzen Fuß auf Land, das bis dahin noch nie ein Mensch vor ihnen betreten hat: Den Gipfel des Mount Everest. Er ist mit 8848 Metern der höchste Berg der Welt, eine wahre Urgewalt aus Stein, Eis und Schnee, die Einheimischen nennen ihn respektvoll „Muttergottheit des Landes”.

Nie zuvor hatte jemand diesen Punkt erreicht, nicht Wenige hatten das Wagnis wegen früherer, stets gescheiterter Expeditionen, für schlicht unmöglich gehalten. Doch nun standen sie da, Hillary und Tenzing, und schüttelten sich ob ihres Triumphs die Hände, „in guter angelsächsicher Tradition”, wie „National Geographic” Hillary später zitieren soll. Danach fielen sie sich in die Arme und aßen ein paar Süßigkeiten. Alles in allem verbrachten sie etwa 15 Minuten auf dem Gipfel. Dafür hatte das britische Empire, in dessen Auftrag sie unterwegs waren, zuvor über drei Dekaden gearbeitet, viele tapfere Bergsteiger bezahlten dafür mit dem Leben.

Die Erstbesteigung des Mount Everest

Hillary und Norgay bezwingen den Everest!

Jahrelang haben sie davon geträumt, wochenlang sind sie aufgestiegen: Am 29. Mai 1953 um 11.30 Uhr erreichen der Neuseeländer Edmund Hillary und derSherpa Tenzing Norgay ihr ehrgeiziges Ziel: Sie stehen als die Allerersten auf dem Gipfel des Mount Everest!

Seit Anfang Mai hat sich eine britische Expedition zumGipfelsturm auf den höchsten Berg der Erde bereit gemacht. Ein Dutzend erfahrener Bergsteiger, 35 Bergführer und 350 Träger mit 18 Tonnen Ausrüstung sind seit dem Frühjahr von Katmandu aus auf dem Weg zum Fuß des Everest. Einerster Angriff auf den Gipfel erfolgt am 26. Mai. Doch die Bergsteiger Tom Bourdillon und Charles Evans scheitern an einem defekten Sauerstoffgerät: Kurz vor dem Ziel müssen die beiden umkehren.

Das ist der Moment für EdmundHillary und Tenzing Norgay, die im Basislager auf ihre Chance warten. Als zweites Team beginnen sie mit dem gefährlichen Aufstieg. Am 28. Mai verbringen sie in Höhe von 8500 Metern eine eisige Nacht. Am nächsten Morgen um 4 Uhr frühstarten sie ihre letzte Etappe: 350 Höhenmeter und eine senkrechte Felsstufe liegen noch vor ihnen – in dieser Höhe kaum zu bewältigen. Doch um 11.30 Uhr haben die beiden es tatsächlich geschafft: Sie stehen auf dem höchsten Punktder Erde, die Welt liegt ihnen zu Füßen! Tenzing schlingt die Arme um Hillary. Der Neuseeländer zückt den Fotoapparat, um die Situation festzuhalten: Der „dritte Pol“ ist erreicht! Nach 15 Minuten auf dem Gipfel machen sich diebeiden Helden an den gefährlichen Abstieg.

Lange Zeit galt der 8848 Meter hohe Mount Everest als unbezwingbar. An dem berüchtigten Riesen im Himalaya waren in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten schon viele Expeditionengescheitert. Die Briten George Mallory und Andrew Irvine hatten es womöglich sogar vor Hillary und Tenzing geschafft. Sie kamen jedoch beim Abstieg ums Leben und blieben verschollen. Bis heute weiß niemand, ob sie tatsächlich aufdem „Berg der Berge“ standen.

Hillary und Norgay bezwingen den Everest!

Das Geheimnis von Hillary und Norgay: Wer war zuerst auf dem Everest?

Das Geheimnis von Hillary und Norgay: Wer war zuerst auf dem Everest?

Am 29. Mai 1953 erreichen der neuseeländische Imker Edmund Hillary und sein nepalesischer Sherpa Tenzing Norgay als erste Menschen den Gipfel des Mount Everest. Wer tatsächlich zuerst oben war, ist bis heute ungeklärt.

Dort vorne, ganz dicht vor ihren Augen, wölbt sich der letzte Hügel. Ein kleiner Höcker nur, kein steiler Anstieg, eher ein sanft geschwungenes weißes Band, breit genug, dass die zwei vermummten Männer nebeneinander herlaufen konnten: „Zehn Meter vorher hielten wir an und warteten einen Moment. Dann gingen wir los.“

So beschreibt Tenzing Norgay, der legendäre Sherpa von Sir Edmund Hillary, in seiner Autobiografie „Tigers of the Snow“ die letzten Schritte auf den Gipfel des Mount Everest. An jenem 29. Mai 1953 um die Mittagszeit sind der neuseeländische Imker Edmund Hillary und Norgay, der Sohn eines nepalesischen Yak-Hirten, die ersten Menschen auf dem Dach der Welt.

Knapp 15 Minuten bleiben sie dort, sitzen nebeneinander, essen ein bisschen Schokolade und beginnen den Abstieg. Das Wetter dreht, die gefürchteten Monsunstürme kündigen sich an, die Zeit drängt. Das einzige Gipfelfoto zeigt Norgay, den Eispickel in der erhobenen rechten Hand. Ein Bild von Hillary gibt es nicht, Norgay kann die Kamera nicht bedienen.

Wer tatsächlich der erste oben war, bleibt ungeklärt, obwohl Norgay in seinem Buch Hillary den Vortritt lässt: „Wir gingen nebeneinander, und ich denke, sein Fuß war zuerst oben.“ Hillary lässt das nicht unwidersprochen, er behauptet, es sei „sicher so gewesen, dass wir beide gleichzeitig oben waren“.

Hillary und Norgay sind Teil einer von dem britischen Offizier John Hunt geleiteten Expedition, es ist der neunte Versuch, den Everest endlich zu bezwingen. Zwei Zweierteams sind dafür vorgesehen, Hillary und Norgay sind nicht die erste Wahl. Das Alpha-Team, Tom Bourdillon und Charles Evans, dreht dicht unter dem Gipfel um, die Erschöpfung und damit das Risiko sind zu groß. Dann schlägt die Stunde von Hillary und Norgay.

Am 28. Mai ziehen die beiden los, der 33-jährige Hillary ist ein erfahrener Bergsteiger, Expeditionsleiter Hunt schätzt ihn als kraftvollen, bärenstarken Macher. Norgay, sechs Jahre älter, ist im Schatten des Everest aufgewachsen, er kennt den Berg und seine Tücken. Auf knapp 8500 m Höhe, 350 m unterhalb des Gipfels, schlagen die beiden ein letztes Nachtlager auf, am frühen Morgen des 29. Mai geht es weiter.

Die letzten 100 Meter werden zur letzten großen Herausforderung für Hillary und Norgay. Die zwölf Meter hohe vertikale Felswand, an der sich die beiden nur mit ihren Eispickeln hochziehen, geht als Hillary Step in die Geschichte ein. Heute gibt es diese Passage in der ursprünglichen Form nicht mehr, der Hillary Step wurde bei einem Erdbeben im Jahr 2015 fast komplett zerstört.

Die Rückkehr in ihren Alltag verläuft für Hillary und Norgay sehr unterschiedlich. Hillary wird schon kurz nach der Krönung der britischen Königin Elizabeth II wenige Tage später zum Ritter des britischen Empire geschlagen, Norgay bleibt diese Ehre verwehrt. „Ein paar Orden“ habe man ihm ans Revers geheftet, erinnert er sich später. Seine lebenslange Freundschaft zu Edmund Hillary bleibt bestehen.

Norgay stirbt 1986 mit 71 Jahren an den Folgen einer Gehirnblutung. Seine Asche wird im von ihm gegründeten und geleiteten Himalayan Mountaineering Institute im Zoo der indischen Stadt Darjeeling im Vorder-Himalaya begraben. Dort steht auch eine Statue von Hillary, der 2008 in Auckland mit 88 Jahren einem Herzinfarkt erliegt. Hillary bekommt ein Staatsbegräbnis, der Eispickel, mit dem er sich den Hillary Step hochgezogen hat, liegt auf seinem Sarg.

Die Nachkommen der beiden legendären Bergsteiger tragen den Traum ihrer Väter weiter. 1990 steht Peter Hillary auf dem Gipfel des Everest, 1996 Norgays Sohn Jamling, ein Jahr später sein Enkel Tashi. Mittlerweile haben fast 10.000 Bergsteiger das Dach der Welt bezwungen, Himalaya-Expeditionen sind zu einer Art Massentourismus verkommen.

Mehr als 300 Menschen verlieren ihr Leben auf dem Weg zum Gipfel, die meisten Leichen bleiben im ewigen Eis. “Viel wichtiger als oben zu stehen ist es, lebendig wieder unten anzukommen“, war schon Hillarys Credo. Dem ist er stets treu geblieben. (sid)

 Das Geheimnis von Hillary und Norgay: Wer war zuerst auf dem Everest?

Everest-Erstbesteigung: Der Bienenzüchter und der Tiger des Schnees

Vor 63 Jahren erklommen Edmund Hillary und Tenzing Norgay als erste Menschen den höchsten Berg der Welt und machten sich zu Legenden

In Österreich wusste jemand schon in der Sandkiste, dass er einmal Bundeskanzler werden würde. Und im fernen Neuseeland, da war sich ein Teenager einst sicher, den höchsten Berg der Welt zu besteigen. Dass ihm das als erstem Menschen überhaupt gelingen sollte, war Edmund Hillary damals vermutlich nicht klar. Doch es war tatsächlich ein historischer Schritt, als er vor genau 63 Jahren gemeinsam mit Sherpa Tenzing Norgay den Mount Everest erklomm. Während aber zum Beispiel Neil Armstrong als erster Mensch auf dem Mond die bedeutungsschwangeren Worte „Das ist ein kleiner Schritt für einen Menschen, ein riesiger Sprung für die Menschheit“ wählte, gab Hillary am 29. Mai 1953 schlicht von sich: „Wir haben den Bastard endlich bezwungen.“ („We finally knocked the bastard off.“)

Hier sollten Ihre Optionen angezeigt werden, um zu entscheiden, wie Sie DER STANDARD nutzen wollen.

Bitte deaktivieren Sie sämtliche Hard- und Software-Komponenten die, in der Lage sind Teile unserer Website zu blockieren. Z.B. Browser-AddOns wie Adblocker oder auch netzwerktechnische Filter.

Everest-Erstbesteigung: Der Bienenzüchter und der Tiger des Schnees

The Truth About Edmund Hillary And Tenzing Norgay’s Relationship

What is it about climbing much of anything? Whether it’s a toddler puffed with pride for having navigated the stairs to the second floor of the house, or, says Outside Online, a New Zealander reaching the top of the world’s highest peak and declaring, „Well, George, we knocked the bastard off,“ as Edmund Hillary did on Mount Everest in 1953 — is it the danger? Is it the thrill of „did-it-first“? Or is it, as George Mallory said three decades before Hillary (per Forbes), „Because it’s there“?

It’s hard to know exactly, but it’s certain that hundreds of people — Mallory among them — have died either ascending or descending Mount Everest, on the border of Nepal and China. Some used supplemental oxygen (the air gets very, very thin at the top of Everest); others thought that was cheating somehow. Oxygen tanks or not, there’s still the cold (very) and unreliable weather (brutal) standing in the way of the summit. Which has never stopped people from trying, as notes.

What is it about climbing much of anything? Whether it’s a toddler puffed with pride for having navigated the stairs to the second floor of the house, or, says Outside Online, a New Zealander reaching the top of the world’s highest peak and declaring, „Well, George, we knocked the bastard off,“ as Edmund Hillary did on Mount Everest in 1953 — is it the danger? Is it the thrill of „did-it-first“? Or is it, as George Mallory said three decades before Hillary (per Forbes), „Because it’s there“?

It’s hard to know exactly, but it’s certain that hundreds of people — Mallory among them — have died either ascending or descending Mount Everest, on the border of Nepal and China. Some used supplemental oxygen (the air gets very, very thin at the top of Everest); others thought that was cheating somehow. Oxygen tanks or not, there’s still the cold (very) and unreliable weather (brutal) standing in the way of the summit. Which has never stopped people from trying, as notes.

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay and the Conquest of Everest

In 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay would be the first men to step foot on the top of the highest place in the world, Mount Everest. This series takes us through that remarkable journey. Each man will have a unique and fascinating background before their lives converge into one of the 20th century’s greatest feats of exploration and adventure.

Auf dem Gipfel des Mount Everest

37 Jahre später, 1990, bekommt Edmund Hillary zu Hause in Neuseeland einen Anruf von seinem Sohn: „Wo bist du?“, fragt der Vater. „Auf dem Gipfel des Everest“, ist die Antwort.

1953, als Hillary auf dem Gipfel stand, musste die Menschheit noch vier Tage warten, bis zum 2. Juni, ehe die Nachricht per Läuferstafette und Funk den Buckingham Palace erreichte und in die Welt hinausging. Wie das geschah, ist ein bizarres Kapitel der Kommunikation. Dahinter steht die große Geschichte der Erstbesteigung des Mount Everest durch Edmund Hillary und Tenzing Norgay Sherpa – zweier Menschen, die aus Welten kamen, wie sie unterschiedlicher kaum hätten sein können.

„Ach“, erinnerte sich Prinz Philip in London später über die Nachricht in der roten Box, „sie half uns zu schlafen in dieser Nacht, so wenig Schlaf wir sonst auch bekamen.“

März 1953, Hochland von Nepal. So etwas haben die Menschen in dem kleinen Königreich noch nicht gesehen: Zwei Marschkolonnen mit insgesamt 350 Trägern und 13 Tonnen Ausrüstung wälzen sich dem Everest entgegen. Die Expedition will einen Traum der Menschheit wahr machen und endlich den höchsten Berg der Erde besteigen: nach der Eroberung von Nord- und Südpol das letzte große Ziel auf Erden.

Seit 1921 sind ein Dutzend Expeditionen am Everest gescheitert, sind 13 Menschen tot am Berg geblieben. Erst wenn sein Gipfel betreten ist, wird die Eroberung der Erde abgeschlossen sein.

22. April 1953, Mount Everest Basislager, 5400 Meter Höhe. Zehn Europäer und 39 Sherpa versammeln sich im untersten der insgesamt neun Lager am Berg. Einige ihrer Kameraden sind schon weiter oben, sie bereiten die Route vor.

Die letzte Chance für Tenzing Norgay Sherpa

Die letzte Chance für die Briten ist auch die letzte Chance für Tenzing Norgay Sherpa. Als sirdar ist er Leiter der Träger, er organisiert den Lastentransport der Expedition. Keiner ist so oft am Everest gewesen wie er.

In den 1920er Jahren, Tenzing war noch ein Kind, versuchten sich drei englische Expeditionen am Berg. Sie rekrutierten Träger vom kleinen Volk der Sherpa am Fuße des Everest. So erfuhren die Sherpa überhaupt erst, dass der Gipfel der höchste der Erde ist. Nach dem Ende der Expeditionen kamen die Träger oft mit Lederstiefeln, Anoraks und Gletscherbrillen in die Dörfer zurück und erzählten von seltsamen Dingen – etwa von der „englischen Luft“, welche die verrückten Briten in Stahlflaschen auf dem Rücken mitschleppten.

1924, Tenzing war zehn Jahre alt, kamen die Träger heim und berichteten vom Verschwinden zweier britischer Bergsteiger, George Mallory und Andrew Irvine. „Ich hörte ihre Namen und vergaß sie nie wieder“, erinnert er sich später.

Als Junge trieb Tenzing Yak-Herden hinauf zu den Almweiden in 5000 Meter Höhe. Er vermochte einem Yak die Halsader zu öffnen und sich das Blut ins Essen zu mischen, das verschaffte Kraft. Nur lesen und schreiben konnte er nicht – es gab keine Schulen im Sherpaland.

Seine Mutter deutete häufig auf den Everest und nannte ihn „Der-Berg-der-so-hoch-ist-dass-kein-Vogel-drüber-fliegen-kann“. Dort oben, so glauben die Sherpa, wohnt Chomolungma, die Göttinmutter der Erde, und so nennen die Sherpa auch den Berg.

In den einsamen Almsommern hatte Tenzing viel Zeit, zu Chomolungma hinaufzusehen. Die anderen Sherpa wunderten sich, warum Menschen ihr Leben riskierten, um auf diesen Gipfel aus Fels und Eis zu steigen – in Tenzing aber wuchs ein Traum: Er wollte der erste Sherpa sein, der mehr war als bloßer Las-tenträger für die sahibs, die weißen Herrschaften. Er wollte eines Tages auf dem Gipfel des Everest stehen.

1935, 1936 und 1938 arbeitet Tenzing als Träger für drei britische Everest-Expeditionen – alle scheitern. Die anderen Sherpa sind froh, wenn sie wieder umkehren dürfen. Tenzing nicht: Er will hinauf, seinen Traum wahr machen. Für ihn ist es wie „ein Fieber im Blut“. 1947 kommt er mit Earl Denman, einem Kanadier. 1952 wird Tenzing der sirdar für zwei Schweizer Everest-Expeditionen, kriecht auf allen Vieren röchelnd dem Gipfel entgegen und stellt mit 8600 Metern einen neuen Höhenrekord auf. Niemand hat am Everest bisher so gelitten und geschuftet wie er – und es überlebt. Nun, mit 39, beginnt seine Kraft nachzulassen. „Es muss jetzt sein“, sagt er sich.

Die britische Expedition beginnt

24. April 1953, Basislager, 5400 Meter. Die 52 Mann der britischen Expedition beginnen mit dem Lastentransport den Everest hinauf. Über dem Lager gleich das erste größere Hindernis auf dem Weg zum Gipfel: der Eisbruch des Khumbu-Gletschers. Über eine Steilstufe bricht hier Eis 700 Meter herab. Vor den Trägern bauen sich haushohe Türme auf, dazwischen klaffen tiefe Spalten. Die gefrorenen Blöcke, labil aufeinander geschichtet, können jederzeit einstürzen und die Kletterer zermalmen. Durch dieses Chaos müssen alle hindurch, auch die Sherpa mit ihren Lasten. Den schauerlichsten Stellen geben die Briten Namen wie „Hillarys Horror“, „Atombombenfeld“ oder „Höllenfeuergasse“.

Oberhalb des Eisbruchs öffnet sich ein flaches Gletschertal, fünf Kilometer lang: Western Cwm haben es die Briten getauft, nach dem walisischen Wort für Tal (die Schweizer nennen es „Tal der Stille“). An ihrem Ende steilt sich die Ebene zu einer Eiswand auf, darüber der Südsattel und die Gipfelpyramide.

Unten im Basislager überwacht Tenzing den Transport, teilt Träger und Lasten ein, treibt an, schlichtet Streit. Dann geht es hinauf durch den Eisbruch, jeweils mit 20 bis 30 Kilogramm auf dem Rücken. Die Sherpa verrichten Schwerstarbeit, schleppen Tonnen von Ausrüstung hinauf; die Briten tragen nur leichtes Gepäck. Oberhalb des Eisfalls entsteht nun in 6400 Meter Höhe das Vorgeschobene Basislager, das nach und nach zum Nervenzentrum der Expedition wird.

Der „Times“-Reporter James Morris sitzt zu dieser Zeit auf einer Veranda im Ort Namche Bazar, 50 Kilometer vom Everest entfernt. Auf ein Blatt Papier kritzelt er einen Geheimcode, der aber nicht wie ein Geheimcode wirken darf. Denn Morris hat ein Problem: Wenn seine Läufer nach Kathmandu unterwegs sind, hat die Konkurrenz sechs Tage Zeit, sie abzufangen – und das tut sie auch.

Für seine Routineberichte vom Fortgang der Expedition interessieren sich seine Kollegen kaum, die kann er im Klartext schicken. Alle warten nur auf die Nachricht aller Nachrichten – Everest bestiegen, ja oder nein. Dafür hatte sich Morris zunächst einen klassischen Geheimcode besorgt, der für Außenstehende wie Nonsens klang; „Golliwog“ stand dabei für Everest.

Doch dann entdeckt der Mann aus London in Namche Bazar einen indischen Militärposten, der einen starken Funksender betreibt – das einzige Gerät dieser Art weit und breit. Seit die Chinesen 1950 ins nahe Tibet einmarschiert sind, erlaubt Nepal seiner Schutzmacht Indien, diesen Militärposten als Frühwarnstation zu nutzen.

Der Funksender wirft alle Pläne von Morris über den Haufen: Vom Basislager bis zum Militärposten sind es nur 50 Kilometer – mindestens fünf Tage Zeitgewinn für jeden, dem es gelingt, den Sender zu nutzen. Morris macht sich mit dem befehlshabenden indischen Offizier bekannt, kann ihm mit Aspirin aushelfen, und der erklärt sich bereit, eine Nachricht nach Kathmandu weiterzuleiten.

Der „Times“-Reporter geht davon aus, dass die Konkurrenz versuchen wird, diese Nachricht abzuhören. Den mitgebrachten Geheimcode für die Läuferstafette darf Morris auf keinen Fall verwenden: Der Offizier würde sich des Hochverrats verdächtig machen, sollte er es wagen, die verschlüsselte Nachricht eines Ausländers zu versenden. Der Brite muss einen neuen Code erfinden – einen, der für den Inder wie ein harmloser Klartext-Bericht klingt.

Also formuliert Morris die Worte „Schneeverhältnisse schlecht“ für die Nachricht „Everest erstiegen“. Ordnet jedem Namen der Expedition eine harmlos klingende Formulierung zu – „Warten auf besseres Wetter“ etwa steht für Tenzing. Den Schlüssel zu diesem neuen Code lässt Morris durch einen zuverlässigen Läufer nach Kathmandu bringen.

Also doch besser die Bettflaschen benützen, die Oberst Hunt hat anfertigen lassen? Aber wie soll das funktionieren, im Schlafsack? In dem müssen ja auch die Bergstiefel Platz finden, sonst gefrieren sie. Zudem hält die Matratze von Noyce nur ein paar Stunden lang die Luft. „Um 1 Uhr morgens raus und pumpen“, erinnert er sich später.

Nachts ein Gehuste und Geröchel in den Zelten. Die trockene Höhenluft dörrt Hals und Nase aus, fast alle leiden wegen der dünnen Luft unter Bronchitis und akuter Atemnot. Bis hier unten hören sie „das Gebrüll von tausend Tigern“, wie Tenzing den Sturm nennt, der durch den Südsattel 600 Meter weiter oben faucht. Dorthin müssen sie am nächsten Tag hinauf.

In der Frühe ein Sherpa-Gesicht im Zelteingang: „Tee, Sahib!“ Die Briten sind in dieser Weltgegend sahibs geblieben – jedem ist ein Sherpa als persönlicher Diener zugewiesen worden: zum Tragen, Kochen, Steigeisen anschnallen.

Für Aufregung hat zu Beginn der Expedition der „Garagenvorfall“ in Kathmandu gesorgt: Die Engländer residierten im Gebäude der britischen Botschaft, den Sherpa wurde die Garage zugewiesen, ohne Wasser und Toilette. Im Gegenzug pinkelten die Sherpa auf der Straße vor der Botschaft. Tenzing Norgay musste beide Seiten besänftigen.

Hunt hat Hillary und Tenzing zu einer Seilschaft erklärt, weil die beiden perfekt zusammenarbeiten. Hillary ist konditionsstark und ehrgeizig, Tenzing erfahren, entschlossen, umsichtig. Einmal steigen die beiden aneinander geseilt den Eisbruch hinab. Hillary will zeigen, wie schnell er ist, wird unvorsichtig und stürzt in eine Spalte – Tenzing reagiert rasch, rammt seinen Eispickel in den Schnee, schlingt das Seil herum und kann so den Fall Hillarys in den Gletscher stoppen. Erfahrung hat Ehrgeiz gerettet. Seither sind die beiden, für alle ersichtlich, ein Team.

Auf seinen vielen Expeditionen hat Tenzing leidlich Englisch gelernt. Sicher gefällt ihm auch, dass Hillary, der ungestüme Neuseeländer, keine englische Sahib-Attitüde pflegt. Die beiden sind eine gut eingespielte Zweckgemeinschaft; Freunde werden sie erst viel später.

Die Expedition geht zuende

30. Mai, 14 Uhr, Vorgeschobenes Basislager, 6400 Meter. Der „Times“-Reporter Morris, der noch nie auf einem Berg war, hat sich mit einer Seilschaft durch den Khumbu-Eisbruch hinaufgearbeitet; hier ist er näher am Geschehen und muss die Konkurrenz weniger fürchten. Am Morgen haben die wartenden Expeditionsmitglieder hoch oben die ganze Südsattel-Mannschaft beim Abstieg gesehen. Ob hoch erfreut oder niedergeschlagen, war nicht auszumachen. Das Radio läuft. Soeben meldet All-India-Radio: „Der Angriff auf den Everest ist gescheitert.“

Kurz darauf kommen Hillary und Tenzing vom Berg herab. Jetzt erst erfahren die meisten Mitglieder der Expedition vom Gipfelsieg. Die Bergsteiger umarmen sich. Einige Sherpa empfangen Tenzing mit gefalteten Händen. Aus Hillary bricht jetzt alles heraus.

Bei Bechern von Limonade und vor versammelter Mannschaft erzählt und erzählt und erzählt er: „Keine Stufen mehr schlagen müssen. Keine Grate mehr überschreiten müssen. Es war eine große Erleichterung für mich, ich sag’s euch. Stimmt’s, Tenzing?“

Der sitzt da und lächelt und isst ein Omelett. „Er war schön anzusehen“, notiert Reporter Morris, „wie er im Moment seines Triumphs da saß, ehe die Schakale des Ruhms ihn umzingelten.“

Am Abend macht sich Morris auf den Weg ins Basislager. Bei einbrechender Nacht eilt er, so schnell es geht, durch den Eisbruch, „die Flanken des größten der Berge hinunter, um eine Nachricht für die Krönung von Elizabeth II. zu überbringen“.

Unten prüft er noch einmal den Geheimcode. Mitten in der Nacht schickt er seinen besten Läufer los: „Lauf damit zu den Indern in Namche Bazar. Lauf allein, sei schnell und verschwiegen.“ Noch 65 Stunden bis zur Krönung.

Als es hell wird, sieht Morris vom nahen Eisbruch eine Gestalt herabsteigen. Wer kann es so eilig haben – will jemand ein Geschäft mit der Konkurrenz machen? Dann erkennt Morris in der Gestalt Tenzing. Zum ersten Mal seit Wochen wäscht sich der sirdar im Gletscherwasser. Er hat noch etwas Wichtiges vor und einen langen Weg vor sich: 56 Kilometer über Berg und Tal, mit dem Everest in den Knochen. In ein paar Tagen will er wieder zur Expedition stoßen, sie nach Kathmandu begleiten.

Auch Morris eilt zu Tal. Beim Kloster Thengboche trifft er auf Peter Jackson, seinen Kollegen von der Nachrichtenagentur „Reuters“. Ein wahrhaft britischer Dialog entspinnt sich.

Jackson: „Es wäre zu schade, wenn sie ihn diesmal nicht besteigen würden.“

Morris: „Schade, sehr schade. Aber da sind immer noch die Franzosen.“

Die Nachricht aller Nachrichten, von Hillary und Tenzing und Morris den Everest hinuntergebracht, wird nun – wie einst die Meldung vom Sieg Athens über die Perser bei Marathon – von einem Läufer 50 Kilometer nach Namche Bazar getragen, am Morgen vom indischen Offizier kraft eines Dynamofahrrads an die indische Botschaft in Kathmandu gefunkt, von dort weitergeleitet zur britischen Botschaft, dann um die halbe Erde nach Whitehall ins britische Außenministerium und weiter an die „Times“ geschickt, anschließend Sir Allen Lascelles, dem Privatsekretär der Queen, telefonisch mitgeteilt und schließlich in die rote Depeschen-Box gesteckt … Und dann singt und tanzt das Volk, dem noch immer infolge des Krieges die Lebensmittel rationiert sind, auf den Straßen Londons: Heute wird unsere Königin gekrönt, und wir haben den Everest bestiegen!

In seinem Zelt im Himalaya hört Morris an diesem Morgen eine Stimme im Radio, die Englisch spricht: „Nach 30 Jahren Anstrengung, über eine ganze Generation hinweg, ist der Gipfel der Erde erreicht und eines der größten aller Abenteuer vollbracht worden.“ Das melde die „Times“.

Tenzing Norgay Sherpa geht ins Dorf Thamey, um seine Mutter zu besuchen. Die freut es, dass ihr Sohn vom „Berg-der-so-hoch-ist-dasskein Vogel-drüber-fliegen-kann“ das Kloster Rongbuk in Tibet sehen konnte. „Wie oft habe ich dir gesagt, dass du nicht auf diesen Berg gehen sollst. Jetzt musst du nicht mehr gehen.“

Und so war es. Thuji chey, Chomolungma. Edmund Hillary drückte es anders aus: „Wir haben’s dem Bastard aber gegeben.“

Zahlreiche gescheiterte Expeditionen

Denn bereits seit 1921 hatte es die ersten (dokumentierten) Bestrebungen gegeben, den Gipfel des Mount Everest zu stürmen. Kein Mann war dabei so hartnäckig gewesen wie die britische Bergsteiger-Legende George Leigh Mallory, der laut „History” einmal, gefragt, warum er den Berg unbedingt besteigen wollte, gesagt haben soll: „Weil er da ist.” Drei Anläufe unternahm Mallory, erreichte den Gipfel mehrmals beinahe, nur um schließlich bei einem weiteren Versuch 1924 gemeinsam mit seinem Kollegen Andrew Irvine spurlos zu verschwinden. Seine gut konservierte Leiche gab der Berg erst 1999 wieder frei. Ob es die beiden tatsächlich als Allererste bis zum Gipfel geschafft haben, ist bis heute unklar.

1952 werden die Briten dann noch fast überholt, als ein Team von Schweizer Bergsteigern dem Gipfel des Mount Everest so nahe kommt wie kein anderes zuvor. Damals müssen Raymond Lambert und ein gewisser, noch unbekannter Tenzing Norgay ganz kurz vor dem Gipfel wegen mangelnder Verpflegung aufgeben, doch die Route über den gefährlichen Khumbu-Gletscher, die sie als erste überhaupt gegangen sind, legt den Grundstein für den späteren Erfolg der britischen Expedition.

350 Träger für die Ausrüstung

Deren Leiter, Colonel John Hunt, hat dafür nur die absolute Elite ausgesucht, darunter eben Hillary, der zuhause in Neuseeland Bienenzüchter ist, und mit den Bergen seiner Heimat eine ideale Trainingsstätte hatte. Laut dem Expeditionsmitglied G. sei Hillary damals auf der absoluten Höhe seiner körperlichen Fitness gewesen: „Es war seine vierte Himalaya-Expedition in etwas über zwei Jahren”, zitiert ihn „National Geographic”. „Er war ein Typ, der die Ärmel hochrollte und Dinge durchzog”. So zum Beispiel die Führung der Truppe über den Khumbu-Gletscher, damit man ein dem Gipfel „nahes” Basislager aufschlagen konnte.

Das Vorhaben war dabei von Anfang an ein wahrer Kraftakt für alle Beteiligten. So wurden etwa 350 Träger benötigt, um die mehrere Tonnen schwere Ausrüstung zu schleppen, dazu 20 Sherpas, darunter auch Tenzing Norgay, der durch seine exzellente Fitness und seine Kenntnis des Himalaya bei der letztlich erfolglosen Schweizer Expedition ein Jahr zuvor aufgefallen war. George Band, Teilnehmer der britischen Gruppe, erinnerte sich Jahre später: „Der grundlegende Plan war, dass es zwei Versuche zur Erstürmung des Gipfels geben würde, ausgeführt von jeweils zwei Mann – und einen möglichen dritten, sofern nötig.”

Extrem knappes Zeitfenster

Ein Problem war vor allem das extrem enge Zeitfenster. Erst am 21. Mai beginnt die Gruppe mit ihren ersten Versuchen, doch schon ab dem soll die gefürchtete Monsun-Zeit hereinbrechen, die unberechenbares Wetter und vor allem schwere Schneestürme im Gebirge mit sich bringen kann. Dann würde allein der gesunde Menschenverstand jeglichen Aufstiegsversuch verbieten. Die Gruppe schlägt also ein erstes Lager auf, laut „Encyclopedia Britannica” auf 7315 Metern Höhe. Am 26. Mai schließlich erreichen Tom Bourdillon und Charles Evans, die als Alpha-Team ausgewählt worden waren, den Südgipfel des Mount Everest. Doch nur etwa 100 Meter unter dem absolut höchsten Punkt der ganzen Welt müssen sie aufgeben, da ihnen der Sauerstoff auszugehen droht.

Die Epic-Travel-Serie von TRAVELBOOK: Ferdinand Magellan – der Mann, der den Pazifik entdeckte

Zwei Tage später bekommen also Hillary und Norgay ihre Chance, sie errichten ein letztes Camp auf 8500 Metern Höhe und verbringen dort eine frostige, schlaflose Nacht, bevor sie in den frühen Morgenstunden des 29. Mai zum Endspurt aufbrechen. Sie erreichen den Südgipfel bereits um 9 Uhr, doch auf den letzten 100 Metern stellt sich ihnen eine letzte, potenziell tödliche Herausforderung entgegen: Eine meterhohe vertikale Wand aus Fels, an der sie sich ungesichert, nur mit ihrer Eiskletter-Ausrüstung mit letzter Kraft hochziehen müssen. Die Passage gilt heute als Hillary-Step, und ist eine der gefährlichsten bei der Besteigung des Mount Everest.

Der Gipfelsturm wird zum Politikum

Auf dem Gipfel galten dann Hillarys Gedanken den 1924 verschollenen Bergsteigerkollegen Mallory und Irvine, wie er „National Geographic” erzählte. „Mit wenig Hoffnung schaute ich mich um, suchte nach irgendeinem Zeichen, dass die Beiden den Gipfel erreicht hätten – ich habe nichts gesehen.” Nach 15 Minuten, ein längerer Aufenthalt wäre tödlicher Leichtsinn gewesen, machen sich Hillary und Norgay wieder an den Abstieg. Auf dem Weg nach unten treffen sie ihren Expeditionskollegen George Lowe, dem Hillary übermütig zuruft: „Well, George, we knocked the bastard off! – Wir haben den Bastard erledigt!”

Die Epic-Travel-Serie von TRAVELBOOK: Amundsen gegen Scott – das tödliche Rennen zum Südpol

Die Nachricht von der Besteigung des Mount Everest verbreitet sich in Kathmandu wie ein Lauffeuer. James Morris, ein Reporter der englischen „Times”, der in einem tieferen Lager den Ausgang der Expedition abgewartet hatte, hat so viel Angst, dass ihm jemand seine Sensations-Story wegschnappen könnte, dass er den Artikel darüber codiert an die heimische Redaktion telegrafiert.

Wer war nun zuerst auf dem Mount Everest?

Doch wer stand nun als Erster auf dem Mount Everest? Der Brite Hillary oder der Nepalese Tenzing? Die nepalesische und indische Presse hoffte auf Tenzing, die britische auf Hillary. Um politischen Spannungen vorzubeugen, entschied man sich für einen Pakt, wie Hillary erzählte: „John Hunt, Tenzing und ich hatten ein Treffen. Wir beschlossen, kein Wort darüber zu verlieren, wer als Erster oben gewesen ist.”

Die Epic-Travel-Serie von TRAVELBOOK: Die fantastischen Reisen von Marco Polo

Diese Absprache blieb bestehen, bis Norgay in seiner Biografie verriet, Hillary sei in der Tat zuerst auf dem Gipfel gewesen. Die Geschichte wird in England am 2. Juni 1953 öffentlich bekannt gemacht wird – genau an dem Tag, an dem Elizabeth II. den englischen Thron besteigt. Die Zeitungen jubeln: „All das, und der Everest noch dazu!” Dennoch entschied sich das Empire übrigens dazu, zwar John Hunt und Edmund Hillary zum Ritter zu schlagen, Tenzing Norgay aber nur einen Verdienstorden zu verleihen, da er kein britischer Staatsbürger war.

Auch interessant: Mount Everest: Probleme bei der Müllentsorgung

Noch heute Run auf den Everest

So oder so: Hillary und Norgay hatten einen Erfolg für die Ewigkeit errungen, der ohnehin nicht in Preisen und Ehrungen messbar ist – und traten eine sprichwörtliche Lawine los, die die Welt des Bergsteigens bis heute in Atem hält. Mittlerweile versuchen jedes Jahr zahlreiche Menschen, den Gipfel zu erreichen, laut „History” haben das bislang etwa 300 von ihnen mit dem Leben bezahlt.

Immer wieder gibt es Kritik an diesem beispiellosen Run auf den Everest, wo sich an manchen Tagen mittlerweile Schlangen zum Gipfel bilden. Bergsteigen ist längst nicht mehr der Gentlemen-Sport, der er einst vorgab zu sein. Der erfahrene Everest-Guide Russel Brice fand dazu gegenüber „National Geographic”, bezogen auf die Kritik an bezahlten Sherpas, folgende Worte: „Wissen Sie, wer der erste geführte Tourist auf dem Berg war? Ed Hillary!” Dieser selbst sagte derselben Zeitung einst über seinen Erfolg: „Tenzing und ich dachten, wenn wir einmal den Berg bestiegen hätten, wäre es unwahrscheinlich, dass es jemals jemand wieder versuchen würde. Wir hätten nicht falscher liegen können.”

Es ist der 29. Mai 1953, Ortszeit 11:30 Uhr, als der neuseeländische Imker Edmund Hillary und sein Kollege, der Nepalese Tenzing Norgay, einen letzten Schritt auf einem Weg machen, der bis dahin bereits über 30 Jahre gedauert hatte. Hillary zuerst, so schreibt es später Norgay in seiner Biografie „Tiger of the Snows”, danach er selbst, setzen Fuß auf Land, das bis dahin noch nie ein Mensch vor ihnen betreten hat: Den Gipfel des Mount Everest. Er ist mit 8848 Metern der höchste Berg der Welt, eine wahre Urgewalt aus Stein, Eis und Schnee, die Einheimischen nennen ihn respektvoll „Muttergottheit des Landes”.

Nie zuvor hatte jemand diesen Punkt erreicht, nicht Wenige hatten das Wagnis wegen früherer, stets gescheiterter Expeditionen, für schlicht unmöglich gehalten. Doch nun standen sie da, Hillary und Tenzing, und schüttelten sich ob ihres Triumphs die Hände, „in guter angelsächsicher Tradition”, wie „National Geographic” Hillary später zitieren soll. Danach fielen sie sich in die Arme und aßen ein paar Süßigkeiten. Alles in allem verbrachten sie etwa 15 Minuten auf dem Gipfel. Dafür hatte das britische Empire, in dessen Auftrag sie unterwegs waren, zuvor über drei Dekaden gearbeitet, viele tapfere Bergsteiger bezahlten dafür mit dem Leben.

Zahlreiche gescheiterte Expeditionen

Denn bereits seit 1921 hatte es die ersten (dokumentierten) Bestrebungen gegeben, den Gipfel des Mount Everest zu stürmen. Kein Mann war dabei so hartnäckig gewesen wie die britische Bergsteiger-Legende George Leigh Mallory, der laut „History” einmal, gefragt, warum er den Berg unbedingt besteigen wollte, gesagt haben soll: „Weil er da ist.” Drei Anläufe unternahm Mallory, erreichte den Gipfel mehrmals beinahe, nur um schließlich bei einem weiteren Versuch 1924 gemeinsam mit seinem Kollegen Andrew Irvine spurlos zu verschwinden. Seine gut konservierte Leiche gab der Berg erst 1999 wieder frei. Ob es die beiden tatsächlich als Allererste bis zum Gipfel geschafft haben, ist bis heute unklar.

1952 werden die Briten dann noch fast überholt, als ein Team von Schweizer Bergsteigern dem Gipfel des Mount Everest so nahe kommt wie kein anderes zuvor. Damals müssen Raymond Lambert und ein gewisser, noch unbekannter Tenzing Norgay ganz kurz vor dem Gipfel wegen mangelnder Verpflegung aufgeben, doch die Route über den gefährlichen Khumbu-Gletscher, die sie als erste überhaupt gegangen sind, legt den Grundstein für den späteren Erfolg der britischen Expedition.

350 Träger für die Ausrüstung

Deren Leiter, Colonel John Hunt, hat dafür nur die absolute Elite ausgesucht, darunter eben Hillary, der zuhause in Neuseeland Bienenzüchter ist, und mit den Bergen seiner Heimat eine ideale Trainingsstätte hatte. Laut dem Expeditionsmitglied G. sei Hillary damals auf der absoluten Höhe seiner körperlichen Fitness gewesen: „Es war seine vierte Himalaya-Expedition in etwas über zwei Jahren”, zitiert ihn „National Geographic”. „Er war ein Typ, der die Ärmel hochrollte und Dinge durchzog”. So zum Beispiel die Führung der Truppe über den Khumbu-Gletscher, damit man ein dem Gipfel „nahes” Basislager aufschlagen konnte.

Das Vorhaben war dabei von Anfang an ein wahrer Kraftakt für alle Beteiligten. So wurden etwa 350 Träger benötigt, um die mehrere Tonnen schwere Ausrüstung zu schleppen, dazu 20 Sherpas, darunter auch Tenzing Norgay, der durch seine exzellente Fitness und seine Kenntnis des Himalaya bei der letztlich erfolglosen Schweizer Expedition ein Jahr zuvor aufgefallen war. George Band, Teilnehmer der britischen Gruppe, erinnerte sich Jahre später: „Der grundlegende Plan war, dass es zwei Versuche zur Erstürmung des Gipfels geben würde, ausgeführt von jeweils zwei Mann – und einen möglichen dritten, sofern nötig.”

Extrem knappes Zeitfenster

Ein Problem war vor allem das extrem enge Zeitfenster. Erst am 21. Mai beginnt die Gruppe mit ihren ersten Versuchen, doch schon ab dem soll die gefürchtete Monsun-Zeit hereinbrechen, die unberechenbares Wetter und vor allem schwere Schneestürme im Gebirge mit sich bringen kann. Dann würde allein der gesunde Menschenverstand jeglichen Aufstiegsversuch verbieten. Die Gruppe schlägt also ein erstes Lager auf, laut „Encyclopedia Britannica” auf 7315 Metern Höhe. Am 26. Mai schließlich erreichen Tom Bourdillon und Charles Evans, die als Alpha-Team ausgewählt worden waren, den Südgipfel des Mount Everest. Doch nur etwa 100 Meter unter dem absolut höchsten Punkt der ganzen Welt müssen sie aufgeben, da ihnen der Sauerstoff auszugehen droht.

Zwei Tage später bekommen also Hillary und Norgay ihre Chance, sie errichten ein letztes Camp auf 8500 Metern Höhe und verbringen dort eine frostige, schlaflose Nacht, bevor sie in den frühen Morgenstunden des 29. Mai zum Endspurt aufbrechen. Sie erreichen den Südgipfel bereits um 9 Uhr, doch auf den letzten 100 Metern stellt sich ihnen eine letzte, potenziell tödliche Herausforderung entgegen: Eine meterhohe vertikale Wand aus Fels, an der sie sich ungesichert, nur mit ihrer Eiskletter-Ausrüstung mit letzter Kraft hochziehen müssen. Die Passage gilt heute als Hillary-Step, und ist eine der gefährlichsten bei der Besteigung des Mount Everest.

Der Gipfelsturm wird zum Politikum

Auf dem Gipfel galten dann Hillarys Gedanken den 1924 verschollenen Bergsteigerkollegen Mallory und Irvine, wie er „National Geographic” erzählte. „Mit wenig Hoffnung schaute ich mich um, suchte nach irgendeinem Zeichen, dass die Beiden den Gipfel erreicht hätten – ich habe nichts gesehen.” Nach 15 Minuten, ein längerer Aufenthalt wäre tödlicher Leichtsinn gewesen, machen sich Hillary und Norgay wieder an den Abstieg. Auf dem Weg nach unten treffen sie ihren Expeditionskollegen George Lowe, dem Hillary übermütig zuruft: „Well, George, we knocked the bastard off! – Wir haben den Bastard erledigt!”

Die Nachricht von der Besteigung des Mount Everest verbreitet sich in Kathmandu wie ein Lauffeuer. James Morris, ein Reporter der englischen „Times”, der in einem tieferen Lager den Ausgang der Expedition abgewartet hatte, hat so viel Angst, dass ihm jemand seine Sensations-Story wegschnappen könnte, dass er den Artikel darüber codiert an die heimische Redaktion telegrafiert.

Wer war nun zuerst auf dem Mount Everest?

Doch wer stand nun als Erster auf dem Mount Everest? Der Brite Hillary oder der Nepalese Tenzing? Die nepalesische und indische Presse hoffte auf Tenzing, die britische auf Hillary. Um politischen Spannungen vorzubeugen, entschied man sich für einen Pakt, wie Hillary erzählte: „John Hunt, Tenzing und ich hatten ein Treffen. Wir beschlossen, kein Wort darüber zu verlieren, wer als Erster oben gewesen ist.”

Diese Absprache blieb bestehen, bis Norgay in seiner Biografie verriet, Hillary sei in der Tat zuerst auf dem Gipfel gewesen. Die Geschichte wird in England am 2. Juni 1953 öffentlich bekannt gemacht wird – genau an dem Tag, an dem Elizabeth II. den englischen Thron besteigt. Die Zeitungen jubeln: „All das, und der Everest noch dazu!” Dennoch entschied sich das Empire übrigens dazu, zwar John Hunt und Edmund Hillary zum Ritter zu schlagen, Tenzing Norgay aber nur einen Verdienstorden zu verleihen, da er kein britischer Staatsbürger war.

Noch heute Run auf den Everest

So oder so: Hillary und Norgay hatten einen Erfolg für die Ewigkeit errungen, der ohnehin nicht in Preisen und Ehrungen messbar ist – und traten eine sprichwörtliche Lawine los, die die Welt des Bergsteigens bis heute in Atem hält. Mittlerweile versuchen jedes Jahr zahlreiche Menschen, den Gipfel zu erreichen, laut „History” haben das bislang etwa 300 von ihnen mit dem Leben bezahlt.

Immer wieder gibt es Kritik an diesem beispiellosen Run auf den Everest, wo sich an manchen Tagen mittlerweile Schlangen zum Gipfel bilden. Bergsteigen ist längst nicht mehr der Gentlemen-Sport, der er einst vorgab zu sein. Der erfahrene Everest-Guide Russel Brice fand dazu gegenüber „National Geographic”, bezogen auf die Kritik an bezahlten Sherpas, folgende Worte: „Wissen Sie, wer der erste geführte Tourist auf dem Berg war? Ed Hillary!” Dieser selbst sagte derselben Zeitung einst über seinen Erfolg: „Tenzing und ich dachten, wenn wir einmal den Berg bestiegen hätten, wäre es unwahrscheinlich, dass es jemals jemand wieder versuchen würde. Wir hätten nicht falscher liegen können.”

Die Sturmnacht vor dem Gipfelsturm

Bevor Edmund Hillary und Tenzing Norgay den Gipfel des Everest erreichten, verbrachten sie eine schreckliche, eisige Nacht. Hillary hat ihre unglaublichen Strapazen sobeschrieben:

„Die Nacht war furchtbar. Ein eisiger Sturm fegte über den höchsten Gipfel der Erde. Tenzing nannte es das Gebrüll von tausend Tigern.Unablässig und unbarmherzig fegte der Sturm, heulend und kreischend, über uns hinweg, mit solcher Gewalt, dass die Leinwand unseres Pyramidenzeltes knatterte wie Gewehrsalven. Wir befanden uns auf dem Südsattel, einemgottverlassenen Platz zwischen den Gipfeln des Everest und des Lhotse. Anstatt sich zu legen, nahm der Sturm immer noch an Wucht zu, und ich bekam langsam Angst, unser flatterndes und knarrendes Obdach könne aus seiner Verankerunggerissen werden und uns schutzlos den Elementen preisgeben. Um Gewicht zu sparen, hatten wir die Einlagen unserer Schlafsäcke zurückgelassen, was sich nun als schwerer Fehler erwies. Obwohl ich meine gesamte Daunenkleidung trug,drang mir die Eiseskälte bis auf die Knochen. Ein Gefühl äußerster Angst und Einsamkeit überkam mich. Was für einen Sinn hatte das alles? Man musste doch verrückt sein, um sich so etwas anzutun!“

Nachdem sie dieSturmnacht überstanden hatten, stand der Gipfelsturm unmittelbar bevor: „Wir hatten keine Zeit zu verlieren. Ich schlug wieder Stufen und hielt allmählich etwas besorgt nach dem Gipfel Ausschau. Es schien ewig so weiterzugehen,und wir waren müde und bewegten uns schon langsamer. In der Ferne breitete sich die kahle Hochebene Tibets aus. Ich blickte nach rechts oben und sah eine schneeige Wölbung. Das musste der Gipfel sein! Wir rückten enger zusammen, alsTenzing das Seil zwischen uns straffte. Wieder schlug ich eine Stufe ins Eis. Und im nächsten Augenblick war ich auf einer Schneefläche angekommen, auf der es nichts gab als Luft – in jeder Richtung. Tenzing kam mir schnell nach, undwir schauten uns staunend um. Mit ungeheurer Befriedigung stellten wir fest, dass wir auf dem höchsten Punkt der Erde standen. Es war 11.30 Uhr am 29. Mai 1953.“

Fotos der Everest-Erstbesteigung Der Gipfelsturm des Jahrhunderts

Die ersten Worte von Edmund Hillary, als er am 29. Mai 1953 ins Hochlager 8 am Mount Everest zurückkehrte, sollen folgende gewesen sein: „George, wir haben den Bastard endlich bezwungen.“ Er sagte das zu seinem guten Freund George Lowe, der in den Tagen zuvor bei der Einrichtung der Route Übermenschliches geleistet hatte und als Fotograf die Expedition begleitete.

Zum 60-jährigen Jubiläum der legendären Erstbesteigung zeigt nun ein neuer Bildband teils unveröffentlichte Aufnahmen aus dem Schatz, den Lowe von der Expedition mitbrachte. Die historische Pionierleistung machte auch ihn berühmt und ließ „eine Art Mythos über meine Fähigkeiten entstehen“, wie er selbst schreibt. Und das, obwohl er vorher nicht einmal professionell als Fotograf gearbeitet hatte.

Die Bilder gingen um die Welt und brachten viele Menschen dazu, ebenfalls von großen Abenteuern zu träumen. „Unsere Gipfelbesteigung war nicht das Ende der Everest-Geschichte, sondern ein neuer Beginn“, schreibt Lowe, der in seinem Buch Kommentare von Zeitzeugen und Bergsteiger-Legenden versammelt.

Seit dem Mai 1953 wurde der Gipfel mehr als 6000-mal bestiegen, mehr als 3500 Menschen standen auf dem höchsten Punkt der Erde auf 8850 Metern Höhe. Längst entwickelte sich eine Art Massentourismus, weil heutzutage jedermann eine Gipfeltour buchen kann, wenn er das nötige Kleingeld besitzt. Ständig suchen Extremabenteurer nach neuen Superlativen am Mount Everest. Am Donnerstag wurde ein 80-jähriger Japaner zum ältesten Mensch, der je den Gipfel erreichte.

Mehr als 200 Menschen starben bei dem Versuch einer Besteigung, fast jedes Jahr kommen neue Todesfälle dazu, 2013 waren es bereits vier. „Ich zähle zu denen, die Glück hatten“, schreibt Lowe. „Es gelang mir, wieder heil herunterzukommen.“

widmet dem Jubiläum der Erstbesteigung eine Ausstellung in London am Oxo Tower Wharf. Bis 9. Juni werden dort historische Fotos gezeigt, darunter einige, die vorher noch nie zu sehen waren. Der Eintritt ist frei.

SPIEGEL+-Zugang wird gerade auf einem anderen Gerät genutzt

SPIEGEL+ kann nur auf einem Gerät zur selben Zeit genutzt werden.

Klicken Sie auf den Button, spielen wir den Hinweis auf dem anderen Gerät aus und Sie können SPIEGEL+ weiter nutzen.

Ein neuer Bildband zeigt zum Teil unveröffentlichte Fotos von der historischen Erstbegehung. Dieses zeigt den Expeditionsfotografen George Lowe, der durch tiefen Schnee zu Lager VII aufsteigt.

Abenteuer in Schwarz-Weiß: Die Bilder zeugen von den Strapazen, die die Bergsteiger auf sich genommen haben.

Fotograf in der Extremsituation: Der Neuseeländer George Lowe hat die Expedition 1953 begleitet und dokumentiert.

Lowe fotografierte die atemberaubende Landschaft, die Bergsteiger und ihre Lager in Tausenden Metern Höhe.

„Tal des Schweigens“: Edmund Hillary und Tenzing Norgay schlagen sich durch den schneebedeckten Gletscher im Western Cwm.

In voller Montur: Norgay und Hillary verlassen am 25. Mai 1953 das Lager IV. Sauerstoffflaschen helfen den beiden, Kraft zu sparen. Der Eispickel (links) ist bereits mit der Flagge für den Gipfel umwickelt.

Triumph ganz oben: Auf den Gipfel kam der Fotograf Lowe nicht mit. Diese Aufnahme von Sherpa Tenzing Norgay machte Edmund Hillary. „Wir sind dankbar“, betete Norgay still und ließ dann die Flagge im Schnee zurück.

Natürliche Schönheit: Die beiden Bergsteiger blieben nur 15 Minuten auf dem Gipfel des Mount Everest.

Ohne ihre Helfer hätten die beiden Bergsteiger es nie geschafft, den Gipfel des Mount Everest zu erklimmen. Das Bild zeigt eine Gruppe Sherpas, die auf einer Weide in Pheriche warten. Hinter ihnen erheben sich der Kangtega und der Thamserku.

Friseur in der Wildnis: Bevor ihnen im Mai 1953 die Erstbesteigung des Mount Everest gelang, unternahmen die Männer bereits andere Expeditionen im Himalaja. Das Bild zeigt, wie Edmund Hillary einen neuen Haarschnitt verpasst kriegt.

Ziel im Himmel: Die Felspyramide des Mount Everest ragt hinter der eisverkrusteten Mauer des Nuptse empor.

Edmund Hillary: „Es ist nicht der Berg, den wir besiegen, sondern unser eigenes Ich.“

Das Buch „Die Eroberung des Mount Everest“, erschienen im Knesebeck Verlag, erzählt mit Dutzenden Originalfotografien sowie Texten von Wegbegleitern und Beobachtern die Geschichte einer historischen Bergbesteigung.

Mount Everest can be a killer climb

Edmund Hillary was a climbing enthusiast from an early age. He’d practiced in his native New Zealand, says Biography, and after service in World War II and reaching the top of New Zealand’s highest point, set his sights on Everest. A beekeeper by trade, he made his first attempt as part of an expedition in 1951, which failed, short of the goal. He tried again as part of the Hunt Expedition two years later, with a local Nepalese Sherpa named Tenzing Norgay as part of the group.

History tells us that Hunt sent a pair of climbers off on the last segment of the climb on May 26, 1953, but they again fell short, exhausted, their oxygen system having failed. On May 28, Hillary and Norgay set out. They spent the night en route, and finished the climb about 11:30 the next morning. „I didn’t jump around and throw my arms in the air. My feeling was essentially one of considerable satisfaction,“ Hillary told Outside in 1999.

Edmund Hillary was a climbing enthusiast from an early age. He’d practiced in his native New Zealand, says Biography, and after service in World War II and reaching the top of New Zealand’s highest point, set his sights on Everest. A beekeeper by trade, he made his first attempt as part of an expedition in 1951, which failed, short of the goal. He tried again as part of the Hunt Expedition two years later, with a local Nepalese Sherpa named Tenzing Norgay as part of the group.

History tells us that Hunt sent a pair of climbers off on the last segment of the climb on May 26, 1953, but they again fell short, exhausted, their oxygen system having failed. On May 28, Hillary and Norgay set out. They spent the night en route, and finished the climb about 11:30 the next morning. „I didn’t jump around and throw my arms in the air. My feeling was essentially one of considerable satisfaction,“ Hillary told Outside in 1999.

The expedition’s success relied on teamwork

„In many ways, Tenzing was more emotional than I was,“ said Hillary. „In a sort of Western fashion, I reached out my hand to shake his, but that wasn’t good enough for him. He threw his arms around my shoulders and gave me a hug. And I gave him a hug, too.“

Of course, everyone wanted to know: Who reached it first? Hillary, or Norgay? In a June 1954 profile in , Norgay explained, in halting English, „I say I first Hillary second, Hillary say Hillary first I second — no good. We both together.“ In Hillary’s mind, „The question of who reaches the top of a mountain first is completely unimportant to the climbers involved.“ What was important was the successful expedition, which relied on superb teamwork and cooperation. Besides the Everest climb, Hillary was known for his profound humility. The two men each wrote books about the experience, and both accounts agreed: Hillary was a few meters ahead of Tenzing and actually completed the climb slightly ahead of Tenzing. „But as far as we were concerned,“ said Hillary, „we had reached the summit together.“

„In many ways, Tenzing was more emotional than I was,“ said Hillary. „In a sort of Western fashion, I reached out my hand to shake his, but that wasn’t good enough for him. He threw his arms around my shoulders and gave me a hug. And I gave him a hug, too.“

Of course, everyone wanted to know: Who reached it first? Hillary, or Norgay? In a June 1954 profile in , Norgay explained, in halting English, „I say I first Hillary second, Hillary say Hillary first I second — no good. We both together.“ In Hillary’s mind, „The question of who reaches the top of a mountain first is completely unimportant to the climbers involved.“ What was important was the successful expedition, which relied on superb teamwork and cooperation. Besides the Everest climb, Hillary was known for his profound humility. The two men each wrote books about the experience, and both accounts agreed: Hillary was a few meters ahead of Tenzing and actually completed the climb slightly ahead of Tenzing. „But as far as we were concerned,“ said Hillary, „we had reached the summit together.“

Episodes

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay and the Conquest of Everest – Part 1In 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay would accomplish one of the great feats of exploration and adventure of the 20th century. In part one of our series, we focus on the attempts to climb Everest in the 1930s, plus cover the life of New Zealander Edmund Hillary.

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay and the Conquest of Everest – Part 2In part two of our series, we focus on the life of Tenzing Norgay, who was born and grew up in the shadow of Mount Everest. In addition to looking at Tenzing’s life, we’ll also talk about the world of the mountain people – in particular the Sherpas – who populate these early decades of Himalayan expeditions.

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay and the Conquest of Everest – Part 3In part three of our series, we take a look at the organization of the 1953 British Mount Everest Expedition under the command of Colonel John Hunt. The great enterprise – with Hillary and Tenzing on board – then heads to Nepal – and to Everest.

In part four of our series, Hillary and Tenzing are paired up. The expedition crosses the Western Cwm, makes their way up to the South Col, and Tenzing and Hillary make a go for the highest spot in the world.

In the final chapter of our series on Tenzing and Hillary, we look at the aftermath of the expedition, and take a look at the lives of our climbers after the 1953 ascent. 

Resources and links

If you are interested in books regarding Everest, Hillary and Tenzing – there is no shortage. Here are a few that I used for this series.

High Adventure: The True Story of the First Ascent of Everest – This was the book Hillary wrote immediately after the Everest climb. It gets a bit in the weeds at times, but still a great first-hand account.

Man of Everest (also called Tiger of the Snows) – This was the book Tenzing put out shortly after the Everest climb. As Tenzing did not read or write, it was dictated by Tenzing and put together by James Ramsey Ullman. While the book is good, it lacks a intimacy as it’s Ullman interpreting Tenzing’s voice. The book can be hard to find.

Tenzing: Hero of Everest – by Ed Douglas – was one of my favorite books I read during this series. Written in 2003, it provides a lot of information from Tenzing’s viewpoint.

Sir Edmund Hillary: An Extraordinary Life – written in 2008 by Alexa Johnson was a very good book looking at all of Hillary’s life works (which are numerous).

Edmund Hillary – A Biography: The extraordinary life of the beekeeper who climbed Everest – By Michael Gill. Biography done by Hillary’s friend.

View from the Summit: The Remarkable Memoir by the First Person to Conquer Everest – Good autobiography by Hillary.

Touching My Father’s Soul: A Sherpa’s Journey to the Top of Everest by Jamling Norgay. Tenzing’s son delivers a well-received book about his father and the Sherpa people.

The Conquest of Everest – Academy Award nominated documentary about the climb. It was shot by Tom Stobbart and directed by George Lowe. Some wonderful footage.

Khumbu Icefall images – This is a stunning sight. This is just a Google Image search – so I recommend looking around and you’ll find all sorts of other images as well.