Category:Barangays of Caloocan

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Barangays of Caloocan List of barangays of Metro Manila Metro Manila Caloocan is divided into 188 barangays.

Category:Barangay 133, Zone 12, Bagong Barrio West, District I, Caloocan City

List of barangays of Metro Manila Legislative districts of Caloocan District 1, Barangays of Caloocan Barangay 133, Zone 12, Bagong Barrio West, District I, Caloocan City

Category:Barangay 133, Zone 12, Bagong Barrio West, District I, Caloocan City

Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

President Duterte and his followers promote the biggest DECEPTION and con in the Philippines. They push for Federalism and constitutional reform or charter change (cha-cha) just to boost political dynasties and to give the Muslims(Moros) their own state, a „BangasaMoro“ (Muslim Nation), an Islamic State within the Philippines.

188 Barangays of Caloocan City within the 3rd district of the Metro Manila Area in the Republic of The Philippines Bagbaguin-Brgy. 165 • Bagong Silang • BF Homes • Camarin • Congress Village • Deparo • Kaibiga • Llano-Brgy.167 • Novaliches • Senate Village • Tala • Vicas•Barangay 1 • Barangay 2 • Barangay 3 • Barangay 4 • Barangay 5 • Barangay 6 • Barangay 7 • Barangay 8 • Barangay 9 • Barangay 10 • Barangay 11 • Barangay 12 • Barangay 13 • Barangay 14 • Barangay 15 • Barangay 16 • Barangay 17 • Barangay 18 • Barangay 19 • Barangay 20 • Barangay 21 • Barangay 22 • Barangay 23 • Barangay 24 • Barangay 25 • Barangay 26 • Barangay 27 • Barangay 28 • Barangay 29 • Barangay 30 • Barangay 31 • Barangay 32 • Barangay 33 • Barangay 34 • Barangay 35 • Barangay 36 • Barangay 37 • Barangay 38 • Barangay 39 • Barangay 40 • Barangay 41 • Barangay 42 • Barangay 43 • Barangay 44 • Barangay 45 • Barangay 46 • Barangay 47 • Barangay 48 • Barangay 49 • Barangay 50 • Barangay 51 • Barangay 52 • Barangay 53 • Barangay 54 • Barangay 55 • Barangay 56 • Barangay 57 • Barangay 58 • Barangay 59 • Barangay 60 • Barangay 61 • Barangay 62 • Barangay 63 • Barangay 64 • Barangay 65 • Barangay 66 • Barangay 67 • Barangay 68 • Barangay 69 • Barangay 70 • Barangay 71 • Barangay 72 • Barangay 73 • Barangay 74 • Barangay 75 • Barangay 76 • Barangay 77 • Barangay 78 • Barangay 79 • Barangay 80 • Barangay 81 • Barangay 82 • Barangay 83 • Barangay 84 • Barangay 85 • Barangay 86 • Barangay 87 • Barangay 88 • Barangay 89 • Barangay 90 • Barangay 91 • Barangay 92 • Barangay 93 • Barangay 94 • Barangay 95 • Barangay 96 • Barangay 97 • Barangay 98 • Barangay 99 • Barangay 100 • Barangay 101 • Barangay 102 • Barangay 103 • Barangay 104 • Barangay 105 • Barangay 106 • Barangay 107 • Barangay 108 • Barangay 109 • Barangay 110 • Barangay 111 • Barangay 112 • Barangay 113 • Barangay 114 • Barangay 115 • Barangay 116 • Barangay 117 • Barangay 118 • Barangay 119 • Barangay 120 • Barangay 121 • Barangay 122 • Barangay 123 • Barangay 124 • Barangay 125 • Barangay 126 • Barangay 127 • Barangay 128 • Barangay 129 • Barangay 130 • Barangay 131 • Barangay 132 • Barangay 133 • Barangay 134 • Barangay 135 • Barangay 136 • Barangay 137 • Barangay 138 • Barangay 139 • Barangay 140 • Barangay 141 • Barangay 142 • Barangay 143 • Barangay 144 • Barangay 145 • Barangay 146 • Barangay 147 • Barangay 148 • Barangay 149 • Barangay 150 • Barangay 151 • Barangay 152 • Barangay 153 • Barangay 154 • Barangay 155 • Barangay 156 • Barangay 157 • Barangay 158 • Barangay 159 • Barangay 160 • Barangay 161 • Barangay 162 • Barangay 163 • Barangay 164 • Barangay 165-Bagbaguin • Barangay 166-Caybiga • Barangay 167-Llano • Barangay 168 • Barangay 169 • Barangay 170 • Barangay 171 • Barangay 172 • Barangay 173 • Barangay 174 • Barangay 175 • Barangay 176 • Barangay 177 • Barangay 178 • Barangay 179 • Barangay 180 • Barangay 181 • Barangay 182 • Barangay 183 • Barangay 184 • Barangay 185 • Barangay 186 • Barangay 187 • Barangay 188

Philippines, is the only country in the world which is 85% Catholic that created FIVE(5) national laws „favoring“, „respecting“ and „financing“ the religion of ISLAM. Then made it unlawful to finance all other religions. The only country in the world that has a government commission that caters to Muslims only, for the hajj, for madrasas, and the at government’s expense PAID by the taxes of Non-Muslims.Religion is always good for the people but it should never be embraced or financed by government. Tax exemption is not tantamount to financing. Every non-profit organization is tax-exempt.

RegionsPhilippine Provinces| Philippine Cities|Municipalities| BarangaysHigh School Reunions

Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

President Duterte and his followers promote the biggest DECEPTION and con in the Philippines. They push for Federalism and constitutional reform or charter change (cha-cha) just to boost political dynasties and to give the Muslims(Moros) their own state, a „BangasaMoro“ (Muslim Nation), an Islamic State within the Philippines.

188 Barangays of Caloocan City within the 3rd district of the Metro Manila Area in the Republic of The Philippines Bagbaguin-Brgy. 165 • Bagong Silang • BF Homes • Camarin • Congress Village • Deparo • Kaibiga • Llano-Brgy.167 • Novaliches • Senate Village • Tala • Vicas•Barangay 1 • Barangay 2 • Barangay 3 • Barangay 4 • Barangay 5 • Barangay 6 • Barangay 7 • Barangay 8 • Barangay 9 • Barangay 10 • Barangay 11 • Barangay 12 • Barangay 13 • Barangay 14 • Barangay 15 • Barangay 16 • Barangay 17 • Barangay 18 • Barangay 19 • Barangay 20 • Barangay 21 • Barangay 22 • Barangay 23 • Barangay 24 • Barangay 25 • Barangay 26 • Barangay 27 • Barangay 28 • Barangay 29 • Barangay 30 • Barangay 31 • Barangay 32 • Barangay 33 • Barangay 34 • Barangay 35 • Barangay 36 • Barangay 37 • Barangay 38 • Barangay 39 • Barangay 40 • Barangay 41 • Barangay 42 • Barangay 43 • Barangay 44 • Barangay 45 • Barangay 46 • Barangay 47 • Barangay 48 • Barangay 49 • Barangay 50 • Barangay 51 • Barangay 52 • Barangay 53 • Barangay 54 • Barangay 55 • Barangay 56 • Barangay 57 • Barangay 58 • Barangay 59 • Barangay 60 • Barangay 61 • Barangay 62 • Barangay 63 • Barangay 64 • Barangay 65 • Barangay 66 • Barangay 67 • Barangay 68 • Barangay 69 • Barangay 70 • Barangay 71 • Barangay 72 • Barangay 73 • Barangay 74 • Barangay 75 • Barangay 76 • Barangay 77 • Barangay 78 • Barangay 79 • Barangay 80 • Barangay 81 • Barangay 82 • Barangay 83 • Barangay 84 • Barangay 85 • Barangay 86 • Barangay 87 • Barangay 88 • Barangay 89 • Barangay 90 • Barangay 91 • Barangay 92 • Barangay 93 • Barangay 94 • Barangay 95 • Barangay 96 • Barangay 97 • Barangay 98 • Barangay 99 • Barangay 100 • Barangay 101 • Barangay 102 • Barangay 103 • Barangay 104 • Barangay 105 • Barangay 106 • Barangay 107 • Barangay 108 • Barangay 109 • Barangay 110 • Barangay 111 • Barangay 112 • Barangay 113 • Barangay 114 • Barangay 115 • Barangay 116 • Barangay 117 • Barangay 118 • Barangay 119 • Barangay 120 • Barangay 121 • Barangay 122 • Barangay 123 • Barangay 124 • Barangay 125 • Barangay 126 • Barangay 127 • Barangay 128 • Barangay 129 • Barangay 130 • Barangay 131 • Barangay 132 • Barangay 133 • Barangay 134 • Barangay 135 • Barangay 136 • Barangay 137 • Barangay 138 • Barangay 139 • Barangay 140 • Barangay 141 • Barangay 142 • Barangay 143 • Barangay 144 • Barangay 145 • Barangay 146 • Barangay 147 • Barangay 148 • Barangay 149 • Barangay 150 • Barangay 151 • Barangay 152 • Barangay 153 • Barangay 154 • Barangay 155 • Barangay 156 • Barangay 157 • Barangay 158 • Barangay 159 • Barangay 160 • Barangay 161 • Barangay 162 • Barangay 163 • Barangay 164 • Barangay 165-Bagbaguin • Barangay 166-Caybiga • Barangay 167-Llano • Barangay 168 • Barangay 169 • Barangay 170 • Barangay 171 • Barangay 172 • Barangay 173 • Barangay 174 • Barangay 175 • Barangay 176 • Barangay 177 • Barangay 178 • Barangay 179 • Barangay 180 • Barangay 181 • Barangay 182 • Barangay 183 • Barangay 184 • Barangay 185 • Barangay 186 • Barangay 187 • Barangay 188

Philippines, is the only country in the world which is 85% Catholic that created FIVE(5) national laws „favoring“, „respecting“ and „financing“ the religion of ISLAM. Then made it unlawful to finance all other religions. The only country in the world that has a government commission that caters to Muslims only, for the hajj, for madrasas, and the at government’s expense PAID by the taxes of Non-Muslims.Religion is always good for the people but it should never be embraced or financed by government. Tax exemption is not tantamount to financing. Every non-profit organization is tax-exempt.

RegionsPhilippine Provinces| Philippine Cities|Municipalities| BarangaysHigh School Reunions

Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

Six Caloocan barangays get good governance seal

Six Caloocan City villages have received the Seal of Good Local Governance for Barangays.  The villages that now have the SGLGB seal are Barangays 67, 170, 176, 177, 178, and 182.

These are the barangays which have been inspected by the Caloocan City Validation Team, which includes the Department of the Interior and Local Government, Liga ng mga Barangay, Barangay Secretariat, and Rotary Club-Kalookan North.

To gain the SGLGB,  a barangay must pass the three core areas: Peace and Order, Financial Administration and the Disaster Preparedness.

Delighted by this development, City Mayor Oscar Malapitan personally honored each of these barangays and their officials. He praised their teams for the kind of services they have rendered that deserve emulation by other barangay in the city.

“Surely, our services to the people of Caloocan will continue for the progress of the city. We hope the honor received by the six barangays will serve as an inspiration to other public servants in Caloocan,” the mayor said.

Previously, the Caloocan City government through the Environment and Management Department spearheaded the cleanup drive in the five barangays of the city the other day. 

About 360 residents volunteered in the program dubbed “3rd Quarter Clean-Up Drive” in Barangays 14, 16, 18, 20, and DILG and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources also joined the program.

The Clean-up Drive was spearheaded by the city government on orders of Mayor Malapitan, who was delighted by the people’s participation in cleaning the city’s environment.

The mayor hoped more will join the clean-up drive in the coming days.

Six Caloocan barangays get good governance seal

Caloocan threatens to lock down more barangays 

Caloocan City warned that barangays with increasing number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases will be placed under total lockdown.

The public information office on May 27, Wednesday, said that “all barangays with increasing cases” are currently “under monitoring” and they are “subject for evaluation” for “possible total lockdown.”

This came after Mayor Oca Malapitan, in a public virtual briefing, disclosed that the local government is considering putting three more barangays under total lockdown. For now, the entire barangay 12 and portions of barangay 28 are on lockdown.

“Meron kaming pinag-aaralan ngayon na tatlong barangay pa kung kakailangan naming i-lockdown to after this [enhanced community quarantine] (We are considering placing three barangays under total lockdown even after this if necessary),” he said.

On the other hand, Malapitan said that the city is ready for the transition of Metro Manila into GCQ. He said that part of the actions they have already taken is allowing tricycle drivers to operate again so workers have means of transportation.

“Pumayag [din] kami ng kunting increase kasi medyo malulugi ang mga tricycle driver (We have allowed them to increase the fare because tricycle drivers might lose income if we did not do it),” he added.

“Nakahanda po ang pamahalaang lungsod sa darating na panahon (We’re ready for the coming days),” Malapitan said. For now, the city is currently conducting swab tests in eight “strategic places,” which include areas placed under total lockdown.

As of Wednesday, May 27, the city has already reported 484 confirmed COVID-19 cases with 111 recoveries and 35 deaths.

Barangay 156 in Caloocan to go under total lockdown for 2 days

MANILA, Philippines — Barangay 156 in District 1 of Caloocan City will be placed under total lockdown for two days starting Wednesday after the city government recorded an increase of COVID-19 cases in the area, police said Tuesday.

Caloocan police chief Col. Dario Menor confirmed in a text message that the lockdown will begin at midnight of May 13 after the city health department documented 25 cases of coronavirus disease in Barangay 156.

An advisory from Sangguniang Kabataan (youth council) of Barangay 156 showed that the lockdown will start from 12:01 a.m. of Wednesday to 11:59 p.m. of May 15, Friday.

Posted by Sangguniang Kabataan Brgy. 156, Caloocan City on Monday, May 11, 2020

The youth council reminded the following guidelines for residents during the lockdown:

Excluded from the lockdown policies are health care workers, essential frontliners of the City Health Department, police officers, authorities of the barangay and residents with medical emergencies.

The council also vowed residents that the city government will distribute relief goods for residents during the two-day lockdown.

The City Health Department will also conduct COVID-19 testing, contact tracing and disease surveillance during the lockdown.

Menor, meanwhile, said they will deploy 75 police officers to ensure that residents will follow city government’s guidelines during the total lockdown.

As of Tuesday, May 12, Caloocan has 269 confirmed cases of COVID-19 including 24 deaths and 42 recoveries.

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138 Caloocan barangays now COVID-free

Only 50 barangays in Caloocan City have active cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Mayor Oscar Malapitan disclosed yesterday.

Malapitan said data from the Caloocan City Health Office showed 138 of 188 barangays in the city have been cleared of the virus.

Meanwhile, the total number of recoveries or those who have recovered from the disease is estimated at 11,596.

The mayor expressed his continued gratitude to every citizen who joined and continuously cooperate with the city’s fight against COVID-19.

“Thank you for the cooperation of every citizen of Caloocan. Simply following health and safety protocols is a big thing to fight this pandemic,” Malapitan said.

“May we continue to be with you until we reach COVID-19-free status in all the barangays in Caloocan City,” he added.

Meanwhile, the Las Piñas City Health Office (CHO) yesterday revealed it aims to target 300 persons daily for swab tests as it continues its expanded citywide targeted testing.

Aside from the daily swab test to ensure the safety of residents, the CHO, as per the order of the city government, intensified its contact tracing effort with the help of 100 contact tracers.

Residents have received a warning from the city government to strictly follow health and safety protocols to prevent infection from the disease.

As part of its intensified anti-COVID-19 fight, the Ligtas 3 isolation facility was inaugurated yesterday in Barangay Almanza Dos, Las Piñas City.

Public Works and Highways (DPWH) Secretary Mark A. Villar, Las Piñas City Mayor Imelda “Mel” T. Aguilar and Vice Mayor April Aguilar-Nery inaugurated the facility at around 9:30 a.m.

The new isolation facility, built at Good Year Building, is made of 26 40-foot container vans, which was donated by the DPWH. It has 99 fully air-conditioned rooms with single beds and clean comfort rooms, with 96 allocated to patients.

There are two rooms for the use of nurses and another designated as x-ray room. ALVIN MURCIA

Caloocan communities rise up vs Tokhang as killings continue

The last two of five killings in Caloocan City at the start of the year came in quick succession: Eleomar Manansala was fatally shot on January 28; the next day it was Carlos Sanchez’ turn to fall to motorcycle-riding gunmen.

The city dotted by slums and grimy factories has seen a spate of killings linked to the government’s anti-drug war and Tokhang, its operational plan. It is not unreasonable to suspect that Manansala, Sanchez and some of the others killed in Caloocan on the first month of 2020 were cases of Tokhang.

Caloocan’s main drug hotspot is in Phase 12 in Tala, known for hosting the sprawling Tala Leprosarium that has long been turned into a general hospital. Citizen protests against Tokhang are also well-documented in these barangays.

A study on “Violence, Human Rights, and Democracy in the Philippines.” led by the Third World Studies of the University of the Philippines is being conducted to explore the difference between the anti-drug campaign before and after 2016, the uniqueness of Tokhang, and the dynamics between the national Tokhang narrative, the participation of local government units, and the spontaneous and organized response of citizens and people’s organizations.

In particular, it probes the critical role of the city and barangay governments in enabling the localization of the president’s anti-drug campaign. It seeks to unravel how violence is generated through the use of government laws and regulations, official and unofficial interaction between state forces and the civilian population, and the president’s fanatic sponsorship and defense of Tokhang.

Caloocan was geographically divided into two areas after its Novaliches and La Loma districts became part of the envisioned new national capital called Quezon City in 1939. The northern part of Caloocan marked the boundary between Metro Manila and Bulacan.

In April 1971, then president Ferdinand Marcos issued Presidential Decree 843 creating the 575.5-hectare Bagong Silang Resettlement Project, which included a big portion of the Tala Estate. It was designated as a relocation area for Manila’s informal settlers.

But after some years, many housing lots remained vacant because intended ‘relocatees’ couldn’t find jobs and livelihood. Eventually, settlers started moving to Bagong Silang and other areas of north Caloocan as the country’s national capital region rapidly urbanized. This was also the time when demolitions in the central commercial areas of Metro Manila in the 1990s pushed urban poor residents to the peripheries of the region, most notably in north Caloocan.

The population census of 2015 shows Bagong Silang or Barangay 176 is the country’s biggest barangay. It has a population of 246,515 or over 15 percent of Caloocan’s nearly 1.6 million people that is already the size of a municipal unit and congressional district in the Philippines

However, despite the implementation of so-called modernization initiatives in the city, north Caloocan continues to lag behind owing to years, if not decades of neglect. Poverty, homelessness, corruption, and joblessness plague the north which lead to rampant criminality, including the proliferation of illegal drug operations.

The number of drug-related killings in Caloocan is lower (373 deaths, based on a study by Ateneo School of Government) compared with the number of fatalities in Quezon City (400) and Manila (463) as of June 2018 (Ateneo School of Government 2018, 16). Yet, Caloocan is consistently touted as the ‘ground zero’ of Tokhang killings.

Perhaps it is because of the city’s previous reputation as a dangerous frontier. But this could be more likely related to high-profile Tokhang cases in the city like the killing of Kian Loyd Delos Santos and South Korean businessman Jee Ick Joo. These two cases triggered widespread public outrage and forced President Rodrigo Duterte to suspend Tokhang. The case of Carl Angelo Arnaiz, another teenager allegedly tortured and killed by Caloocan police, also sustained protests against Tokhang.

Data from the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) confirm that Caloocan is not the priority of its anti-drug campaign. There were only 88 PDEA-led barangay operations in Caloocan from July 2016 to September 2018 compared with 362 in Quezon City and 453 in Manila. Joint operations involving PDEA and other agencies covered only 10 barangays in Caloocan compared with 103 in Manila and 570 in Quezon City.

Meanwhile, Philippine National Police (PNP) data from December 2017 to June 2018 showed that the local PNP was more active than PDEA in Caloocan. It covered 101 of the city’s 188 barangays, while it operated in 73 barangays in Quezon City and 106 in Manila.

The police put the number of drug pushers in Caloocan at 6,500 while it estimated more than 50,000 of them each in Manila and Quezon City. But the Caloocan police seemed more aggressive because despite the city’s lower number of suspected drug personalities, it netted 18,753 drug surrenderers compared to 20,714 in Quezon City and 49,000 in Manila.

Tokhang didn’t create a new mechanism that would legitimize the increased participation of barangay units and city governments in the campaign against illegal drugs. It invoked existing laws and regulations to require the presence of local government units in all phases of Tokhang operations. What made Tokhang unique is the linking of the anti-drug campaign with the LGU mandate of drafting an anti-criminality action plan and the enforcement of a peace and order program.

The PNP Barangay Peacekeeping Operations Manual published in 2009 mentions the value of ‘ronda’ operations as a community peacekeeping activity because of the involvement of community members. Barangay officials and tanod members are described as ‘force multipliers’ in the daily peacekeeping activities under the supervision of a PNP officer (PNP 2009, 14-15).

Tokhang appears to be a repackaging of the ‘ronda’ operation involving policemen and barangay officials focused on eliminating the drug menace at the community level. It enjoined barangay units through Anti-Drug Abuse Councils or ADAC, to support and implement the five stages of Tokhang: collection and validation of information, coordination, house to house visitation, processing and documentation, monitoring and evaluation. In fact, the PNP’s ‘Double Barrel’ memo issued on July 1, 2016 reminded designated team leaders to ensure the presence of ADAC members in all Tokhang operations.

To boost compliance, PNP directives are supplemented by guidelines issued by the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) and the Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB). These memos mandated barangays to provide not just a supporting role but a crucial responsibility in implementing Tokhang.

For many years, Phase 12 in Barangay 188, Tala has been known as north Caloocan’s drug den, where a shabu laboratory existed. After the election victory of Duterte, Phase 12 became one of the first areas targeted by Tokhang operations which led to the killing of its barangay captain and most of the barangay kagawads. The anti-drug operations later spread from Phase 12 to other areas of north Caloocan.

Tokhang operations implied local government support and this was evident in Caloocan. In August 2017, the city strengthened the Caloocan Anti-Drug Abuse Office (more popularly known as OCADA, probably named after Mayor ‘Oca’ Malapitan) by passing an ordinance allotting funds for its staffing requirements. The city’s 2019 budget included P11.2 million for a drug rehabilitation center and P49.5 million for OCADA. Caloocan’s proposed ordinance with a substantial amount of funding for OCADA was the city’s direct endorsement to DILG’s order to revitalize ADACs.

Barangay LGUs were given explicit instructions by the city government to cooperate with the PNP’s Tokhang operations. City councilors were discouraged from providing burial assistance and visiting the wake of Tokhang victims.

After the death of Kian in August 2017, the city government organized ‘ronda operations’ composed of barangay officials with tanod members, police, and assigned city councilors per zone and barangays to implement ordinances banning the sale of liquor to minors (passed in November 2005), regulating the use of videoke and karaoke machines (passed in November 2016), and mandating new curfew hours for children (passed in August 2017).

The ‘ronda’ lasted almost a month during which the combined forces of PNP and LGU conducted checkpoints and barangay visits every night after 10 p.m. It was meant to express LGU support to the PNP, despite the backlash of the killing of Kian, and to justify the arrest of minors while Tokhang operations were undertaken.

Despite the announcement of the Department of Education (DEPED) about its refusal to conduct mandatory drug tests, some Caloocan schools initially tried to proceed with this but was stopped by parents who protested the scheme. In some schools like the Cielito Zamora High School Annex, students from grades 7 to 10 were required to sign a waiver informing them and their families of the random drug testing by the school.

Phase 12 in Barangay 188, the notorious drug hotspot in north Caloocan, continued to operate despite the change of leadership in the city government. On June 25, 2016, Barangay Chairman Edres Romuros Domato was killed. Edres was a suspected operator or protector of the drug lab. His son Edison, who was the barangay’s number one kagawad, became the chairman but he was also killed in September 2016. Members of the Domato family soon left the community. The rest of the barangay kagawads were also killed until only one member of the council was left. As of January 2019, illegal drug transactions remained rampant in the area.

The killings reverberated across the north not only because they involved prominent barangay leaders but also because minors became a collateral damage in the Tokhang operations.

North Caloocan residents felt the impact of Tokhang after the consecutive killing of Barangay 188 Phase 12 officials. This left an impression that notorious drug personalities were being singled out but many were still shocked by the daring methods used to kill the barangay officials. After the Phase 12 killings and the attacks against some barangay officials in the district, Tokhang soon spread to other barangays and instantly created terror.

Barangay units were tapped to provide the initial data about the extent of drug use and illegal drug trade in their jurisdictions. Their early role was to submit a list of drug users and pushers. During a human rights workshop organized by IBON NGO in May 2017, some barangay officials from north Caloocan expressed frustration because the drug watch list they compiled and forwarded to the police soon became a death list. They said they were torn between complying with the law and listening to their conscience (batas o konsiyensya?). Barangays, which are traditional conduits for political patronage (read: pork barrel) especially in vote-rich north Caloocan, have been reoriented to prioritize the setting up of Tokhang mechanisms at the grassroots level.

Spontaneous public outrage against Tokhang emerged when minors like Lenin Baylon were killed or neighbors became witnesses to brutal Tokhang operations. Public perception against Tokhang became more palpable after the massacre of three minors on 28 December 28 in Phase 8. Protests and collective actions by people’s organizations within the district were openly organized in January 2017. Funeral marches turned into protests, rallies targeted police headquarters, and major street intersections in Tala, Bagong Silang, and Camarin became protest centers.

‘Know Your Rights’ lecture caravan was conceptualized by activist groups in the community such as Gabriela, Anakpawis, and Anakbayan. Later, they formed a broader network of concerned residents and sought legal aid from national human rights groups. Their first project was the launch of an education campaign that seeks to fight fear by empowering community members with knowledge about their human rights and protective laws in response to Tokhang.

Formal and informal discussions were held in houses, garages, basketball courts, daycare centers, alleys, church courtyards, and even barangay halls.

North Caloocan-based activists and church workers led the discussions while participants shared testimonies about their experience with Tokhang. The lecture became an opportunity to exchange practical knowledge on what to do during a Tokhang raid.

A hotline was set up to spread information and provide access to residents who were interested about resisting Tokhang but unable to join the lecture series.

Volunteers also provided counseling, legal advice, medical aid, and other forms of assistance to families of Tokhang victims. They partnered with formations like the ‘Stop the Killings’ network and ‘Rise Up for Life’ to sustain these activities.

The lecture series proved effective in countering the fear propagated by Tokhang implementers. It helped in reviving and sustaining grassroots resistance not just against Tokhang but other manifestations of state terror.

The 2017 protests in north Caloocan reflected the broader opposition against Tokhang across the country. The community-based actions contributed in amplifying the voices denouncing the surge of drug-related killings. Overall, the national and local protests forced the Duterte government to suspend Tokhang while recalibrating its campaign against illegal drugs.

After more than a year of saturating north Caloocan with Tokhang raids characterized by almost weekly spectacles of dead bodies and arbitrary arrests, the trauma created by this violent phase of the government’s campaign against illegal drugs is reflected in the formation of an impression among residents that the killings victimized hundreds, if not thousands of their friends, families, and neighbors.

Tokhang’s bloody legacy continues to stigmatize drug users while raising a certain level of paranoia and hysteria among residents. Residents have become more cautious in their actions to survive the rampaging police-led Tokhang operatives. Reloaded or not, Tokhang under the Duterte regime has remained an insidious form of social control.

When relocating informal settler families, local governments are assessing the readiness of communities and one of the indicators they are using is called ‘social disarticulation’ which they define as the ‘disruption of existing social fabric.’

The impact of Tokhang could be similar to the demolition of communities but its methods are more brutal and sinister while shrouded in extralegal secrecy and affects a wider segment of the local population. It intensifies state intrusion into the lives of the poor, overkill police deployment is legitimized, and the community’s state of underdevelopment is entirely blamed on the drug problem. It also undermines solidarity among neighbors by instigating citizen surveillance, making it more difficult to promote unity in challenging the reign of oppressive local authorities. Community solidarity is shattered by Tokhang where everybody is seen as a suspect or snitch in a supposedly drug-affected barangay.

The ferocity of Tokhang is made more evident in a community which was originally designated as a relocation area for informal settlers but whose residents have been targeted once more by a government program that resembles ‘demolition’ operations.

Tokhang’s controversial features such as extrajudicial killings, arbitrary arrests, and expanded presence of the police are evident in north Caloocan. Support from LGU officials is also visible and this is sustained by well-funded programs that advocate the fulfillment of Tokhang objectives. Tokhang’s many uses for politicians in power, especially those who are eager to protect their future mandate, are reflected in the case of north Caloocan.

The ‘shock and awe’ slaying of barangay leaders in Phase 12 mirrored the brutal methods of Tokhang at the national level. Yet, illegal drug transactions are still rampant in the barangay like in other parts of the country. It points to the failure of the Tokhang approach and also the senselessness of continuing a discredited program that merely unleashed a tremendous wave of violence and suffering.

To probe what Tokhang did to urban poor communities can be a depressing endeavor, but again the story of north Caloocan also offers some hope. That in spite of the ruthlessness and Tokhang-related terror inflicted on the local population, there were citizens who learned to resist and this inspired courage in others. That there is another a way to deal with Tokhang other than to stay silent or survive its brutality. That it is possible to fight back.

An Act Merging, Dividing, and/or Reviving the Different Barangays in Caloocan City and for Other Purposes

Section 1. The seventy (70) barangays constituting the first congressional district of Caloocan City are hereby reduced to only thirty (30) barangays as follows:

a. Barangay Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Sangandaan Norte with the following boundaries:

b. Barangay Nos. 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Bonifacio with the following boundaries:

c. Barangay Nos. 82, 83, 84 and 85 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Morning Breeze with the following boundaries:

d. Barangay Nos. 132 and 133 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Zapote with the following boundaries:

e. Barangay Nos. 134, 135, 136, 137, 138 and 139 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Unang Sigaw with the following boundaries:

f. Barangay Nos. 142, 143, 144 and 145 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Bagong Barrio Norte with the following boundaries:

g. Barangay Nos. 140, 141, 147, 151 and 154 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Bagong Barrio Sur with the following boundaries:

h. Barangay Nos. 146, 148, 148 and 150 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Tandang Sora with the following boundaries:

i. Barangay Nos. 152, 153 and 155 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay 25 ng Pebrero with the following boundaries:

j. Barangay Nos. 156, 157, 158 and 159 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Baesa Sur with the following boundaries:

k. Barangay Nos. 160 and 161 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Baesa Norte with the following boundaries:

l. Barangay Nos. 162 and 163 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Sta. Quiteria with the following boundaries:

m. Barangay No. 164 shall be known as Barangay Talipapa with the following boundaries:

n. Barangay No. 165 shall be known as Barangay Bagbaguin with the following boundaries:

o. Barangay No. 166 shall be known as Barangay Caybiga with the following boundaries:

p. Barangay Nos. 167 and 169 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Llano with the following boundaries:

q. Barangay Nos. 168, 170 and 172 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Deparo with the following boundaries:

r. Barangay Nos. 171 and 173 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Bagumbong with the following boundaries:

s. Barangay No. 174 shall be known as Barangay Camarin Este with the following boundaries:

t. Barangay 175 shall be known as Barangay Camarin Norte with the following boundaries:

u. Barangay Nos. 177 and 178 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Camarin Sur with the following boundaries:

v. Phases I and II of Barangay 176 (Bagong Silang) shall become a separate barangay and shall be known as Barangay Timog Silangan Bagong Silang with the following boundaries:

w. Phase IV of Barangay 176 (Bagong Silang) shall become a separate barangay and shall be known as Barangay Kanluran Bagong Silang with the following boundaries:

x. Phases III and V-A of Barangay 176 (Bagong Silang) shall become a separate barangay and shall be known as Barangay Timog Bagong Silang with the following boundaries:

y. Phase VII and VIII of Barangay 176 (Bagong Silang) shall become a separate barangay and shall be known as Barangay Hilaga-Silangan Bagong Silang with the following boundaries:

z. Phases IX and X of Barangay 176 (Bagong Silang) shall become a separate barangay and shall be known as Barangay Bagong Silang Hilaga with the following boundaries:

a.a Barangay Nos. 179, 180 and 183 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Amparo with the following boundaries:

b.b Barangay Nos. 181 and 182 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Pangarap with the following boundaries:

c.c Barangay Nos. 184, 185 and 186 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Malaria with the following boundaries:

d.d Barangay Nos. 187 and 188 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Tala with the following boundaries:

Section 2. The one hundred eighteen (118) barangays composing the second congressional district of Caloocan City are hereby reduced to thirty (30) barangays as follows:

a. Barangay Nos. 5, 6, 7 and 8 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Sangandaan Sur with the following boundaries:

b. Barangay Nos. 9, 10, 11 and 12 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Talisay with the following boundaries:

c. Barangay Nos. 13, 14 and 16 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Oscar Baello with the following boundaries:

d. Barangay Nos. 15, 17 and 18 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Emilio Sanchez with the following boundaries:

e. Barangay Nos. 19, 20 and 22 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Col. Pacheco with the following boundaries:

f. Barangay Nos. 21, 23 and 24 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Cayong Asistio with the following boundaries:

g. Barangay Nos. 26, 27 and 28 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Lerma with the following boundaries:

h. Barangay Nos. 25, 29, 32 and 33 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Silangan Maypajo with the following boundaries:

i. Barangay Nos. 30, 31, 34 and 35 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Maypajo Kanluran with the following boundaries:

j. The area north of the Dagat-Dagatan Project of the NHA is hereby constituted as a separated barangay which shall be known as Barangay Hilaga Dagat-Dagatan with the following boundaries:

k. The area south of the Dagat-Dagatan Project of the NHA is hereby constituted as a separate barangay which shall be known as Barangay Timog Dagat-Dagatan with the following boundaries:

l. Barangay Nos. 36 and 37 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Marulas with the following boundaries:

m. Barangay Nos. 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Venus with the following boundaries:

n. Barangay Nos. 43, 46, 49 and 50 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Timog Daang Bakal with the following boundaries:

o. Barangay Nos. 52, 53, 56 and 59 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Daang Bakal Sentro with the following boundaries:

p. Barangay Nos. 63, 64, 65 and 73 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Daang Bakal Hilaga with the following boundaries:

q. Barangay Nos. 44, 45, 47, 48, 51, 55 and 54 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Don Toribio Teodoro with the following boundaries:

r. Barangay Nos. 57, 58, 60, 61 and 62 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Grace Park with the following boundaries:

s. Barangay Nos. 66, 67, 68, 69 and 71 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Grace Park Hilaga which shall have the following boundaries:

t. Barangay Nos. 70, 72, 74, 75 and 76 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Calaanan and shall have the following boundaries:

u. Barangay Nos. 86, 87, 88, 89, 90 and 91 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Our Lady of Grace and shall have the following boundaries:

v. Barangay Nos. 92, 93, 94, 96 and 97 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Biglang Awa and shall have the following boundaries:

w. Barangay Nos. 95, 98, 99 and 100 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Balintawak with the following boundaries:

x. Barangay Nos. 101, 102 and 105 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Galino with the following boundaries:

y. Barangay Nos. 103, 104, 106, 107, 108 and 109 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Silangan Grace Park with the following boundaries:

z. Barangay Nos. 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116 and 123 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Pio del Pilar and shall have the following boundaries:

a.a Barangay Nos. 117, 118, 119 and 120 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Maligaya with the following boundaries:

b.b Barangay Nos. 121, 122, 124 and 125 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay Banal and shall have the following boundaries:

c.c Barangay Nos. 126, 127 and 128 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay San Jose Hilaga and shall have the following boundaries:

d.d Barangay Nos. 129, 130 and 131 are hereby merged and shall be known as Barangay San Jose Timog and shall have the following boundaries:

Section 3. The first officials of the barangays created under this Act shall be elected during the regular barangay elections scheduled as provided by law. Meanwhile, the existing barangays shall continue to function under their regularly elected or appointed barangay officials in accordance with law.

Section 4. Upon assumption of office of the first set of barangay officials of the barangays created under this Act, the old barangays shall be out of existence and all their moneys, properties and obligations shall be assumed by the new succeeding barangay.

Section 5. The merger, division and/or revival of the different barangays as herein provided shall take effect if a majority of the voters who cast their votes shall approve the same in a plebiscite that shall be called for that purpose in Caloocan City by the Commission on Elections within thirty (30) days from the approval of this Act by the President of the Philippines.

Section 6. The expenses in holding the plebiscite provided in Section 5 hereof shall be taken out of the Contingent Fund under the current fiscal year appropriations.

Section 7. This Act shall take effect upon its approval.

Contents: Barangays

The population of the barangays in Caloocan City by census years

Source: National Statistics Office of the Philippines (web), National Statistical Coordination Board (web).

Explanation: Area figures are computed by using geospatial data.

Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines supports Philippine Cycling

Philippine Cycling is about cycling in the Philippnes. Philippine Cycling helps promote bike races, cycling clubs, bicycle tours, and the development of bicycle trails. Activities are coordinated with bike shops and cycling clubs throughout the Philippines to promote the fun of riding bikes. Philippine Cycling will be coordinating events with tour of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. Road biking and mountain bikings will be promoted by Philippine Cycling.

Your cycling activity can be posted here and it will be shown in all the Provincial, City, Municipal and Barangay pages. Your 2015 Cycling Race or Activity can be Posted here.

Churches, Mosques, or Places of Worship in Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

The name of your church, mosque, or place of worship can be listed in this community page. Take a picture of the facade of your church or place of worship and it can be posted here. We can even provide you with a free webpage. You can enter the data (story about your place of worship) here yourself, email the information or pictures to () or via Facebook.

Natural Resources of Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

This page needs some articles about the natural resources of Barangay 73, Caloocan City. Where does the energy source of this Caloocan City come from? Are there any mining industries? Rivers and tributaries are part of the natural resources.

Your Story about Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

Tell your story about Barangay 73. You can talk about the good things in Barangay 73 or simply talk about the past. You can talk about the eco-system of Barangay 73. What is the local LGU doing about the preservation of your natural resources?The topic can start here and once it gets bigger it can have a page of its own in Z-Wiki. It’s all up to you.

The oldest man or woman in Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

Do you know who the oldest man or woman is in Barangay 73?Z-Wiki is starting this inquiry in order to honor the older generation of the provide the full name and date of birth of the elder living in Barangay 73. We will then post your entry in the Oldest Man or Woman in the Philippines page.

Sports News of Barangay 73, Caloocan City, Philippines

Every community has its sports hero. Who is the sports hero of Barangay 73? Are there any basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, baseball fields, softball fields, or any type of sports area or arena in Barangay 73? Go ahead and list any upcoming sports events in Barangay 73.

Why Z-Wiki Barangay 73, Caloocan City?

We want to give the people of Barangay 73 the ability to promote their community to the world via the internet by providing this interactive website. The growth of this website of Barangay 73 is not dependent upon one individual. This website will grow as more people of Barangay 73 participate and provide valid information about the community and also by providing pictures about the community. More power to Barangay 73.

Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines supports Philippine Cycling

Philippine Cycling is about cycling in the Philippnes. Philippine Cycling helps promote bike races, cycling clubs, bicycle tours, and the development of bicycle trails. Activities are coordinated with bike shops and cycling clubs throughout the Philippines to promote the fun of riding bikes. Philippine Cycling will be coordinating events with tour of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. Road biking and mountain bikings will be promoted by Philippine Cycling.

Your cycling activity can be posted here and it will be shown in all the Provincial, City, Municipal and Barangay pages. Your 2015 Cycling Race or Activity can be Posted here.

Churches, Mosques, or Places of Worship in Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

The name of your church, mosque, or place of worship can be listed in this community page. Take a picture of the facade of your church or place of worship and it can be posted here. We can even provide you with a free webpage. You can enter the data (story about your place of worship) here yourself, email the information or pictures to () or via Facebook.

Natural Resources of Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

This page needs some articles about the natural resources of Barangay 20, Caloocan City. Where does the energy source of this Caloocan City come from? Are there any mining industries? Rivers and tributaries are part of the natural resources.

Your Story about Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

Tell your story about Barangay 20. You can talk about the good things in Barangay 20 or simply talk about the past. You can talk about the eco-system of Barangay 20. What is the local LGU doing about the preservation of your natural resources?The topic can start here and once it gets bigger it can have a page of its own in Z-Wiki. It’s all up to you.

The oldest man or woman in Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

Do you know who the oldest man or woman is in Barangay 20?Z-Wiki is starting this inquiry in order to honor the older generation of the provide the full name and date of birth of the elder living in Barangay 20. We will then post your entry in the Oldest Man or Woman in the Philippines page.

Sports News of Barangay 20, Caloocan City, Philippines

Every community has its sports hero. Who is the sports hero of Barangay 20? Are there any basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, baseball fields, softball fields, or any type of sports area or arena in Barangay 20? Go ahead and list any upcoming sports events in Barangay 20.

Why Z-Wiki Barangay 20, Caloocan City?

We want to give the people of Barangay 20 the ability to promote their community to the world via the internet by providing this interactive website. The growth of this website of Barangay 20 is not dependent upon one individual. This website will grow as more people of Barangay 20 participate and provide valid information about the community and also by providing pictures about the community. More power to Barangay 20.

Etymology

There is a mixed preference over the preferred spelling of the city’s name. Variation, and the apparent confusion over the spelling, came about during the early 1970s, when a resolution was adopted by the municipal board, requiring the city departments to use the name „Kalookan.“ The execution of the said resolution was interrupted when the country was placed under a martial law in September 1972. After the restoration of city and municipal councils, then-city councilor Aurora Asistio-Henson filed Resolution No. 006, amending the previous resolution and seeking to promote Filipino nationalism by requiring all residents and all offices and establishments in the city, „whether public or private,“ to spell the name of the city as „Kalookan.“ According to Henson, the „Filipinized spelling“ provides essence and significance to the city’s history, and she added that it should be used „in the city hall, the barangay halls, public markets, and other places for the information and guidance of all concerned.“ Nevertheless, this change in spelling was denounced by the city residents, business owners, and officials. Former legislator and mayor Virgilio Robles declared the move illegal because it lacked congressional approval. He added that the city’s name is spelled as „Caloocan“ as shown in the city charter. The general inclination of spelling in the city is „Caloocan“ and not „Kalookan,“ despite the existing city ordinance, although confusion has led to varied spelling choices of many businesses throughout the city. The official logo has the city’s name spelled as „Caloocan,“ and such spelling is favored by many barangays and public and private schools in the city. „Kalookan“ is preferred by the Makati-based Directories of the Philippines Corporation (DPC), while many national newspapers and magazines, and mapmakers like the Mandaluyong-based HYDN Publishing favor „Caloocan.“ [6] [7]

Demographics

As of 2015, the city has a population of 1,583,978 people, which makes it the fourth largest city in the Philippines in population.  [3] Under the same census year, Caloocan South (Barangays 1 to 164) has a population of 585,091 and Caloocan North (Barangays 165 to 188) has a population of 998,887. If the two districts are treated as separate cities, they will still be among the largest in country for the 2015 census year – ranking as the 4th and 17th with the highest population.

The population density of Caloocan (28,387 persons per square kilometer) surpasses that of the NCR population density. [18]

Of the country’s 238 legislative districts (LDs), the First LD of Caloocan was the biggest in terms of population size, with 1.19 million persons. [19]

Most residents speak both Filipino and English, with considerable numbers speaking other languages and dialects.

Like many other places in the country, Roman Catholicism is the predominant religion. There is a significant presence of Iglesia ni Cristo and other Protestant churches like Church of God Caloocan located at Baesa, Caloocan City.

Economy

Caloocan’s 10th Avenue area is well known for the clusters of motorcycle dealers and motorcycle spare parts dealers. Among the major and famous streets are P. Zamora Street and A. Mabini Street.

Numerous banks have branches in the city such as East West BankMetroBankMaybankChinabankBank of the Philippine Islands, Our Lady of Grace Credit Cooperative, etc.

The city also has a number of shopping malls and stand-alone supermarkets and hypermarkets including the former Ever Gotesco Grand Central (and future SM City Grand Central), Puregold Maypajo, Monumento and Caloocan, Victory Central Mall, Puregold Monumento, Araneta Square, Uniwide Warehouse Club Monumento, SM Center Sangandaan which are in Monumento area in the south. In the north, there are two shopping malls serving the residents of Bagong Silang and Camarin, namely, Zabarte Town Center, Holiday Island Mall and Metroplaza Mall. Savemore Market have three branches which are located in Kiko Camarin in Barangay 178 (Kiko Camarin), Zabarte inside Zabarte Town Center, Kaybiga and Primark Deparo. Puregold Price Club also opened three branches in North Caloocan which are located in Zabarte, Bagong Silang and Deparo. In 2017, Primark Town Center Deparo started to serve the residents of Deparo and the nearby barangays of Bagumbong and Llano.

Manila North Tollways Corporation (the concession holder of the North Luzon Expressway), is headquartered in Caloocan. The North Luzon Expressway, through Segment 10.1 also traverses through Caloocan from the right-of-way of the Philippine National Railways.

Related Research Articles

is a highly urbanized city and the most populous city in the Philippines. It was founded by and named after Manuel L. Quezon, the 2nd President of the Philippines, to replace Manila as the national capital. The city was proclaimed as such in 1948, though a significant number of government buildings remained in Manila. Quezon City held status as the official capital until 1976 when a presidential decree was issued to reinstate and designate Manila as the capital and Metro Manila as the seat of government.

, is a 1st class highly urbanized city in the National Capital Region of the Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 365,525 people. 

The are the representations of the highly urbanized city of Quezon in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The city is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth congressional districts.

is a private Catholic basic and higher educational institution administered by the Augustinian nuns in Caloocan City, Philippines. It was founded in February 1995 and is one of the two La Consolacion schools in the city, and one of the 24 schools owned and administered by the Augustinian Sisters of Our Lady of Consolation (ASOLC).

The was the beginning of the Philippine Revolution against the Spanish Empire.

, is a network of roads and bridges that altogether form the eighth radial road of Manila in the Philippines. It runs north-south through northern Metro Manila linking the City of Manila with Quezon City, Caloocan, and Valenzuela into the northern provinces of Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Pangasinan, and La Union. The portion of R-8 between Guiguinto and Balintawak is also designated a component of the Pan-Philippine Highway network (AH26). It also has a spur segment in Quirino Highway from NLEX to its junction with R-7 at Commonwealth Avenue, both in Quezon City.

C-4, is a network of roads and bridges that all together form the fourth beltway of Metro Manila in the Philippines. Spanning some 28.1 kilometers (17.5 mi), it connects the cities of Caloocan, Makati, Malabon, Mandaluyong, Navotas, Pasay, Quezon City, and San Juan.

is a major east–west street in Caloocan, northern Metro Manila, Philippines. The road is a continuation of Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (EDSA), linked to it via the Bonifacio Monument Roundabout (Monumento) to form a single through route. These roads form part of Circumferential Road 4 (C-4) of the Metro Manila Road Network.

Metro Manila, the capital region of the Philippines, is a large metropolitan area that has several levels of subdivisions. Administratively, the region is divided into seventeen primary local government units with their own separate elected mayors and councils who are coordinated by the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority, a national government agency headed by a chairperson directly appointed by the Philippine president. The cities and municipality that form the region’s local government units are further divided into several barangays or villages which are headed by an elected barangay captain and barangay council.

is a barangay of Caloocan, Metro Manila, Philippines. It is known for being the most populous barangay in the Philippines.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Metro Manila:

, is an urban park in Caloocan, northern Metro Manila, the Philippines. It is situated at the border between the villages of Barangay 187 and Barangay 188 in the former Tala Estate in North Caloocan close to the boundary with San Jose del Monte, Bulacan. The park is one of three city-owned parks in Caloocan under the management of the Caloocan Parks Administration Services, the others being the Buena Park and Sports Complex in South Caloocan and the Caloocan Amparo Nature Park in eastern Tala, North Caloocan.

, is one of many barangays located in the west portion of Quezon City sharing a boundary with Caloocan.

Barangay 169 is a barangay of Caloocan, Metro Manila, Philippines. The barangay is known for having jurisdiction of the larger portions of the Banco Filipino-developed real estate projects in Northern Manila, and is considered one of the most affluent barangays in Caloocan City.

is a two-to-four lane, major east-west thoroughfare situated in the cities of Valenzuela, North Caloocan and Quezon City. Heavy traffic is usually expected when traversing this road due to concentration of tricycles and jeepneys, commercial establishments, warehouses and factories along and near the vicinity, although there have been multiple plans to alleviate traffic congestion such as obstruction removal, road widening and improvement, and construction of additional roads like the Mindanao Avenue extension.

, is an undivided four-lane street in Caloocan, Metro Manila, Philippines that stretches east–west, bisecting south Caloocan. Like most avenues in the Grace Park area, it crosses a grid system of numbered streets that run from north to south, with other numbered avenues running from east to west. 10th Avenue was formally renamed as „Asistio Avenue“ prior to the reversion of its current name, owing to it being the tenth avenue running east–west from the city’s border with Manila in the south. The former renaming was done in 1984 to honor the former Mayor of Caloocan who served from 1962 to 1971 and the father of another Caloocan mayor Boy Asistio, but has since been disregarded and reverted.

Maguindanao

Legislators also passed House Bill 6413 with a 22-0-0 vote, pushing to split Maguindanao province into Maguindanao del Norte and Maguindanao del Sur. The northern Maguindanao province will get the municipalities of Barira, Buldon, Datu Blah Sinsuat, Datu Odin Sinsuat, Kabuntalan, Matanog, Northern Kabuntalan, Parang, North Upi, Sultan Kudarat, Sultan Mastura, and Talitay. Maguindanao Del Sur will then get the remaining 24 municipalities. 

Tolentino said the bill will allow effective delivery of public services in the areas — a sentiment shared by some of his colleagues.

„They have 36 municipalities, with 508 barangays so time has come really for their province also to be geographically set apart to make it a bit more manageable for their leaders,“ said Senator Miguel Zubiri, who also noted that the measure has been pushed in Congress ever since his first term as Senator in 2008.

However, residents of affected areas will still have to vote in a plebiscite organized by the Comelec to approve the establishment of the new provinces. The plebiscite should be conducted within 90 days from the effectivity of the law, the expenses of which shall be covered by the present province of Maguindanao, the bill said.

Provincial officials will be elected in the May 2022 national and local polls, but if the law is ratified within six months or more prior to the elections, the vice governor and the next ranking elective member of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan of the present Maguindanao, who are residents of Maguindanao del Norte, will assume as its acting governor and acting vice governor respectively. Meanwhile, the incumbent governor of Maguindanao will take the helm of Maguindanao del Sur.

The ownership of provincial assets and properties of each local government unit shall belong to the province where it is situated, the bill added. Moreover, obligations, debts and assets shall be shared or paid equally by the two new provinces, while transitory projects and activities will be financed by the present Maguindanao province, the measure provided.

106 barangays in Caloocan City now COVID-free

A total of 106 out of Caloocan City’s 188 barangays are already free or do not have active coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases, Mayor Oca Malapitan said Friday.

Based on the latest data provided by the local government, these are the only areas with active COVID-19 cases: Barangay 1, 2, 5, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 21, 22, 25, 26, 27, 28, 33, 34, 35, 36, 38, 40, 43, 52, 54, 56, 61, 63, 66, 67, 70, 74, 80, 81, 82, 84, 87, 88, 90, 93, 98, 111, 118, 120, 133, 136, 141, 143, 149, 151, 153, 154, 160, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186, 187, and 188.

Out of the city’s 11,619 confirmed cases, 11,075 patients have already recovered while 314 died.

Malapitan expressed his gratitude for the cooperation of his constituents, but he reminded them to continue observing health and safety protocols against the spread of the virus.

“Hindi pa po tapos ang ating laban sa Covid-19. Patuloy po tayong nagpapaalala na mag-ingat ang lahat upang tuluyan nang mawala ang virus na ito (Our fight against COVID-19 is not yet done. We continue reminding everyone to take care of themselves to totally contain the virus),” Malapitan said.

Population by age group

According to the 2015 Census, the age group with the highest population in Barangay 55 is 25 to 29, with 141 individuals. Conversely, the age groups with the lowest population are in the ranges 75 to 79, and 80 and over, with 7 individuals.

Historical population

The population of Barangay 55 fell from 1,438 in 1990 to 1,262 in 2015, a decrease of 176 people. The latest census figures in 2015 denote a negative growth rate of 4.07%, or a decrease of 308 people, from the previous population of 1,570 in 2010.

Historical population

The population of Barangay 18 grew from 7,778 in 1990 to 10,306 in 2015, an increase of 2,528 people. The latest census figures in 2015 denote a positive growth rate of 0.32%, or an increase of 169 people, from the previous population of 10,137 in 2010.

Barangay Upper Bicutan residents threaten to hurt social workers

Barangay Upper Bicutan residents threaten to hurt social workers

The Taguig City government suspended on Tuesday the distribution of the national government’s financial assistance in Barangay Upper Bicutan after residents not on the list of beneficiaries stormed the venue and threatened to hurt social worker…

Barangay Upper Bicutan residents threaten to hurt social workers

Barangay Upper Bicutan residents threaten to hurt social workers

The Taguig City government suspended on Tuesday the distribution of the national government’s financial assistance in Barangay Upper Bicutan after residents not on the list of beneficiaries stormed the venue and threatened to hurt social worker…

Surface Drainages

Caloocan City has surface waters that either have natural course (creeks and rivers) or constructed to serve as drainages to remove excess water from soil surfaces. South Caloocan has about 5.0 km length of open drainage canals that serve mainly the reclamation area comprising Kaunlaran Village (Dagat-Dagatan Development Project) and nearly 11.3 km length of natural surface water coursing through the different natural river systems. These include the Tinajeros-Tullahan River along the Caloocan-Valenzuela boundary; Maligaya Creek within Rizal Avenue Extension; Casili Creek which terminates in Estero de Maypajo, and Cantarilla/Panaca creek along the Caloocan-Malabon boundary. In North Caloocan, all surface waters consist of natural streams, the longest being the Meycauayan-Marilao River dividing Caloocan and Bulacan. Others include the Bagong Silang River, Tala, Camarin, Pasong Malapad, and Bagumbong Creeks crossing multiple subdivisions, for 52.7 km length within the city’s territorial boundaries. [13]

Barangays

Caloocan has 188 barangays divided into 2 legislative districts divided by Samson Road and EDSA. District 1 is composed of 70 barangays, which include Barangays 1–4, 77-85 and 132–188, while District 2 is composed of 118 barangays, which include Barangays 5 to 76 and 86 to 131. [9] The city uses a hybrid system for its barangays, further dividing the cities into 16 Zones. Among the cities in Metro Manila, only Manila, Pasay and Caloocan implement the so-called „Zone Systems“. A zone is a group of barangays in a district. Although a zone is considered a subdivision in the local government units, the people do not elect a leader for the zone in a popular election similar to the normal barangay or local elections as the system is merely for statistical purposes. Further, all barangays have their corresponding numbers but only a few — mostly in the northern part — have corresponding names. However, names of barrios and districts do not necessarily coincide with barangay perimeters. Barangays in southern Caloocan are smaller compared to their northern counterparts.

In 1989, Republic Act 6714 called for reducing the 70 barangays constituting the first congressional district of Caloocan City to only thirty (30) barangays, while the 118 barangays composing the second congressional district of Caloocan City were to be reduced to thirty (30) barangays. It was presumably defeated in the plebiscite that followed. [20]

Barangay Bagong Silang (176) is the most populous barangay in the country with a population of 246,515 people or 16% of the total population of Caloocan City.  [3] This was due to the continuous influx of informal settler families through relocation programs since the 1970s. As a result, there has been calls by residents to subdivide the Bagong Silang into seven distinct barangays [21] [22]

In 1957, the sitio of Bagbaguin was separated from the barrio of Kaybiga and converted into a distinct barrio known as barrio Bagbaguin. [23]

The Senate on Tuesday approved on third and final reading three measures that seek to create new legislative districts in Caloocan City, Bulacan, and Maguindanao province. (FILE PHOTO)

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, March 9) — The Senate on Tuesday approved on third and final reading three measures that seek to create new legislative districts in Caloocan City, Bulacan, and Maguindanao province.

With a 20-0-0 vote, senators approved House Bill No. 7700 which divides the First District of Caloocan City into two, creating the Third Legislative District which will take effect in the 2022 national and local elections. The First District will cover Barangays 1, 2, 3, 4, and 77 up to 177. Meanwhile, the Third District will be composed of Barangays 178 until 188. 

Senator Francis Tolentino, sponsor of the measure and chairman of the Local Government Committee, said the bill was necessary as Caloocan’s First District was the most populous district in the country with 1.19 million residents.

The upper chamber also voted 21-0-0 for House Bill 6867 which divides Bulacan province further into six districts. Bulacan currently has four districts as well as the lone district of San Jose Del Monte City. But the new bill will move the municipalities of Guiguinto, Balagtas, Pandi, and Bocaue to the Fifth District, and the towns of Sta. Maria, Norzagay, and Angat to the Sixth District. 

The bill states all incumbent Congress members of the province shall continue to hold office until the expiration of their terms. The Commission on Elections shall issue the rules and regulations for both measures, each of the bills said.