Bodh Gaya

Bodh Gaya

Coordinates: 24°41′42″N 84°59′29″E / 24.695102, 84.991275The village of is in the Gaya district in the Indian state of Bihar. It is situated west of the Phalgu River, a tributary of the Ganges River. India’s 2001 census reported Bodh Gaya’s population as 30,883.

Bodh Gaya is considered by Buddhists as one of the world’s holiest cities, having served as the place of Gautama Buddha’s enlightenment. The main monastery of Bodh Gaya, around which the city was built, is the Mahabodhi Temple, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002 based upon the criteria that it has

Bodh Gaya

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How to Visit Bodh Gaya India: Where Buddha Became Enlightened

Bodh Gaya is the most important Buddhist pilgrimage destination in the world. Located in the state of Bihar, India, it’s here that Lord Buddha became enlightened during intense meditation under a Bodhi tree. The exact spot is now marked by the sprawling Mahabodhi temple complex. In this very serene place, monks from all over the world can be found sitting at the foot of an enormous carved Buddha statue, reading holy scriptures, and in deep contemplation. The town is also home to dozens of Buddhist monasteries, maintained by various Buddhist countries. An increasing number of people visit Bodh Gaya each year.

How to Visit Bodh Gaya India: Where Buddha Became Enlightened

Bodh Gaya

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Bodh Gaya, also spelled Buddh Gaya, town, southwestern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated west of the Phalgu River, a tributary of the Ganges (Ganga) River.

Bodh Gaya contains one of the holiest of Buddhist sites: the location where, under the sacred pipal, or Bo tree, Gautama Buddha (Prince Siddhartha) attained enlightenment and became the Buddha. A simple shrine was built by the emperor Ashoka (3rd century bce) to mark the spot, and this was later enclosed by a stone railing (1st century bce), part of which still remains. The uprights have representations of the VedicIndra and Surya, and the railing medallions are carved with imaginary beasts. The shrine was replaced in the Kushan period (2nd century ce) by the present Mahabodhi templeWorld Heritage site in 2002), which was itself refurbished in the Pala-Sena period (750–1200), heavily restored by the British archaeologist Sir Alexander Cunningham in the second half of the 19th century, and finally restored by Myanmar (Burmese) Buddhists in 1882. The temple’s central tower stands 180 feet (54 metres) above the ground. A museum contains various Buddhist relics. Bodh Gaya is the site of Magadh University (1962). Pop. (2001) 30,857; (2011) 38,439 .

Bodh Gaya

Bodh Gaya

Bodh GayaBodhgayaHindi: बोधगया) is a city in Gaya districtIndian stateBihar. It is famous for being the place of Gautama Buddha’s attainment of nirvanaEnlightenment).

Historically, it was known as the Bodhimanda (ground around the Bodhi-tree), Uruvela, Sambodhi, Vajrasana and Mahabodhi. [1] The name Bodh Gaya did not come into use until the 18th century. The main monastery of Bodhgaya used to be called the Bodhimanda-vihāra (Pali). Now it is called the Mahabodhi Temple.

For Buddhists, Bodh Gaya is the most important of the main four pilgrimage sites related to the life of Gautama Buddha, the other three being LumbiniSarnath. In 2002, Mahabodhi Temple, located in Bodh Gaya, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site. [2]

The surrounding town, by contrast, is dusty, noisy and somewhat polluted, due in large part to the large numbers of pilgrims and tourists who visit there. [3] A new development plan has been proposed to „ensure a sustainable and prosperous future“ for Bodh Gaya, but has become controversial because such a plan may require the relocation of whole neighborhoods.[4]

Bodhgayanews updates

November 3, 2020, Canberra. Thank you for visiting Bodhgayanews. This website contains:

August 22, 2020. There is a problem developing though which is that traffic to the website looks likely to be causing it to exceed its download allowance. I can’t figure out now how to stop this, other than I have tried trimming back non essential large files that people, or web bots, may be downloading in ever greater numbers. It’s possible that this may mean trouble for this website coming up, i.e. it won’t work any longer .

November 3, 2020. I have gone back to using Dreamweaver 4 to manage the site which may mean some functionality that was in the site while I has subscribed to Dreamweaver CC may no longer function.

May 29, 2018, Canberra. I have continued to develop the हिन्दी एक्स्प्रेस (Hindi Express) pages here on this website over the last two years but otherwise have not been able to develop this site further. I hope to make some more updates shortly.

March 26, 2016, Canberra. There have had to be a number of changes in this website over this last year, in particular three things I used to do are no longer running for one reason or another. Due to some technical reason I cannot resolve the databases which used to run the Pali Canon search engine no longer work properly, so I have had to take them off line. This was similar to the way in which something went wrong with my hosting of my artwork on this website, again not something I was able to fix. Nor yet am I keeping track of Bodhgaya news in any effective manner, so for that it is probably better to look elsewhere on the web now. Currently the main things which I am hosting on this website are.

I hope you find whatever you find here of use and will continue to run the website in some way for as long as I can.

January 27, 2015. Melbourne. This year the site will keep on running. इसमें एक नई बात है कि मैं अब साइट पर हिन्दी में भी लिख लूँ, जो अच्छी बात है। Most visitors are coming to consult the Pali Canon: Online Database which will keep running. The Hindi teaching resources are now enhanced with a new set of pages currently being tested called हिन्दी एक्स्प्रेस. These materials are intended to support the first semester of online learning for students studying with ANU from Canberra. The apni dukan activity is currently offline for upgrading.

For stories about Bodhgaya there are are now interesting news sites such as Rajasthan Patrika which published a number of Bodhgaya stories in 2014, such as

December 23, 2013. Melbourne. During 2014 this website will continue to run in this coming year and feature mainly three types of resources.

The original archives of English translations of Hindi news stories related to Bodhgaya from 2002 to 2013, accessible though the „archives“ links on the right, for more see

The Hindi studies resources, accessible through the Hindi Studies Icon at the top right, which include a number of useful dictionary resources and links to other sites. Including a shopping activity from May 2013 (no longer functioning)

The Buddhist Studies resources, accessible through the Buddhist Studies icon at the top left. There you will find the links to a database of the complete Buddhist Canon in Pali language and links to other useful sites, see Pali Canon: Online Database (no longer functioning)

Finally, there are also still links to pages related to my publications and artworks.

I am not currently indending to continue translating Bodhgaya news and posting those items here, as in part in the decade since I began this site the accessiblity of stories about Bodhgaya has improved, and although Google translate still can’t handle long complex sentences it does now allow for non-Hindi speakers to get at least an idea of the kind of stories being covered in the Hindi press. In order to do this you can use the Google Hindi paper search link on the right hand side navigation of this page and then see what Google makes of the translation.

Google Hindi paper Search Search ‚Bodhgaya‘ Also why not visit: Rajasthan Patrika

Contents

[8] is a village in the state of Bihar. As the site of the Buddha Shakyamuni’s enlightenment, Bodh Gaya is the most revered of all Buddhist sacred sites.

The main temple complex houses the famous Mahabodhi temple/stupa and a descendant of the original Bodhi Tree under which the Buddha gained enlightenment. Inside the Mahabodhi temple complex you can also enjoy the Lotus Pond or the meditation garden. Bodh Gaya has temples or monasteries from many other nations with a Buddhist tradition (Bhutan, Bangladesh, China, Japan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tibet), all within easy walking distance from the Mahabodhi temple.

Beware[edit]

Don’t fall prey for people on motor bikes posing as tourist guides, offering a local tour for a price multiple times than genuine price of around 500-1000 INR.(Check whether they have a genuine Government issued ID card)

Please note that every tourist attraction in Bodh Gaya is easy to locate and are within 5-15 minutes walking distance from the Mahabodhi Temple complex. If you do wish to hire a local tour guide, for example to visit the Barabar Caves (20 K.M.) or Dungeshwari Caves (12 K.M.), first ask for their official Bihar State Tourism Development Corporation ID card; and then bargain. It should NEVER be more than INR 500-1000 for an entire day trip on a motorcycle, no matter how far you drive out of town.

Usually, like all tourist places, street vendors and shop keepers overcharge for their goods. Be prepared to bargain heavily in souvenir shops.

Do[edit][add listing]

Bodh Gaya is essentially a pilgrimage destination for Buddhists and all of its main attractions are related to this. The subsidiary tourist industry that has grown up around it (shopping, eating, and accommodation) is not really the main attraction. Perhaps unique to Bodh Gaya are the rather cheesy CDs for sale near the temple entrance that purport to be monks chanting Buddhist texts. You will know whether you want to take this home with you!

Whether you’re a Buddhist or not, the main thing to do in Bodh Gaya is just to absorb the vibe of the place where the Buddha attained awakening.

Bodh Gaya Tourism

Bodh Gaya is a Buddhist pilgrimage site in Gaya District of Bihar. Famous for the Mahabodhi Temple, It was here under the Bodhi tree that Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment.

It is now one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and a lot of foreign countries, including Japan and China, have helped the Indian government in building facilities for the Buddhist pilgrims. The place is bustling with pilgrims all through the year from India and abroad who come to pay their homage in monasteries, temples and remnants of Bodhi Tree.Located near the river Neranjana, Bodh Gaya was earlier known as Uruwela. It was also known as Sambodhi, Vajrasana or Mahabodhi until the 18th century CE. It is one of the four important Buddhist sites that include: Kushinagar, Lumbini and Sarnath.

Top Hotels In Bodh Gaya

Contents

However, this holy city reflects the discord of the human condition. It is located in one of the poorest and most violent regions of India. In spite of Bodh Gaya’s illustrious past as the place of Buddha’s enlightenment and its revered status, many of the city’s people today suffer tremendous hardship.

History

Archaeological excavations provide evidence of human habitation in Bodh Gaya as early as 1100 There is evidence of settled agriculture, hunting and fishing, as well as copperbamboofish hooks, stone implements, and pottery have been unearthed. Cereals and rice were being cultivated, as is evidenced by rice husk impressions in the Black and Red ware pottery. [1] The introduction of iron implements and coinage occurred between 600-200 Also arising during this time were new techniques in the creation of pottery, resulting in mirror-like light ceramic known as Northern Black Polished Pottery.

The Iron Age was also the era of Gautama Buddha’s life, especially significant to Bodh Gaya as the location of his enlightenment. According to Buddhist and Brahminical texts both Bodh Gaya and Gaya were beginning to host religious pilgrims by the end of this period.

Over the next several hundred years the village became a major Buddhist pilgrimage location. Emperor Ashoka visited Bodh Gaya approximately 250 years after Buddha’s time, erecting a monument in the form of a shrine under the Bodhi Tree under which, according to tradition, the Buddha attained enlightenment. Ashoka is credited with being the creator of the well-known Mahabodhi Temple.

Buddhism, and Bodh Gaya with it, flourished. The city was at the heart of a Buddhist civilization for centuries, with life being centered around the Mahabodhi Temple and other monasteries and monuments. At least four additional shrines were added to the main temple by the thidteenth century, at which time the city was conquered by Turkish armies.

Bodh Gaya’s temple and monasteries fell into ruin when state support ceased under the rule of the Islamic Sultanate of Delhi. During this time Buddhist Siddhas, and Shaivite Nath Siddha ascetics continued practice in the village and Shaivite ascetics established a permanent monastery. Eventually the Abott became the local ruler, which lasted until India’s independence in 1947.

The city’s center, the Mahabodhi Temple, was in serious disrepair by the 1880s, when a Burmese mission to repair the temple began. At the same time the British annexed Burma, spurring the Britain into supportive action. At this point the British Archaeological Society took over the rebuilding of the temple under the direction of Alexander Cunningham. The present form of the temple complex is that of this nineteenth century reconstruction. [3] Also during this time a Ceylonese Buddhist leader, Anagarika Dharmapala, began a long campaign to return responsibility for the temple to Buddhist management.

Following India’s independence in 1947 management of the Mahabodhi Temple became increasingly controversial. It was eventually taken out of the hands of the Hindu Abotts and put into the hands of The Temple Management Committee, formed specifically for this purpose. The committee consisted of both Hindus and Buddhists, with a required majority of Hindus.

In the 1990s followers of Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar campaigned for exclusive Buddhist control of the temple, which was granted.

Name

In the sixth century Bodh Gaya was known as Uruvilva or Uruvela. Within two hundred years that name fell into dis-use and the city has had several names since that time, all influenced by the historic event of Buddha’s enlightenment. These names include:

By 1861 when the temple was excavated and restored, it was popularly called Buddha-Gaya or Bodh Gaya.

Geography

Bodh Gaya City is located in the Gaya district of the Indian state of Bihar, six miles (ten km) south of the city of Gaya. It is located on the western banks of the Phalgu River (or ), one of the tributaries of the river Ganges.

Bodh Gaya Block covers an area of over 96 square miles (249 sq km) and contains 139 villages. The total population of the block is 91,882. [4] The population of the Bodh Gaya city proper was 30,883 according to the 2001 census.

Bihar lies near the junction of the Gangetic Plain and the Choṭa Nāgpur plateau and is notoriously hot (highs of 35-40 °C; 95-105 °F) in the summer months of April to mid-June. Monsoon season takes place in June, July, August, and September. The weather is quite pleasant during the periods of October and November and February and March. It is mildly cold in the winter months, which consist of December and January (lows of 5 to 10 °C; 41 to 50 °F).

Economy

The population of Bodh Gaya Block is predominately rural, with the majority of people participating in agriculture as a primary occupation. Crops in the surrounding region include grains, oilseeds, and sugarcane, aided through irrigation from four nearby rivers: the Son, Pūnpūn, and Morhar in addition to the Phalgu.

Most of the money that comes into the area, however, comes from the tourism trade. Bodh Gaya was designated as one of the four official pilgrimage sites by Gautama Buddha. For this reason many devout Buddhists travel to the city as part of their religious development. The city plays host not only to the religiously devout, but also to those who travel to the city for its historic and cultural significance.

Pilgrimage sites

In 1953, Bodh Gaya began to experience development as an international pilgrimage destination. Buddhist temples and monasteries in the city have since been built by the people of ChinaJapanMyanmarNepalSikkimSri LankaThailandTibet and Vietnam in a wide area around the temple. These buildings reflect the architectural style and both exterior and interior decoration of their respective countries. The statue of Buddha in the Chinese Temple is 200 years old and was brought from China. Japan’s Nippon Temple is shaped like a pagoda. The Myanmar (Burmese) Temple is also pagoda-shaped and is reminiscent of Pagan. The Thai Temple has a typical sloping, curved roof covered with golden tiles. Inside, the temple holds a massive and spectacular bronze statue of Buddha. In a 100 year old garden beside the Thai temple is an 82 foot (25 m) recently erected statue of the Buddha. There are two Tibetan Buddhist temples.

Contents

Bodh Gaya is a village in the state of Bihar. It was the site of the Buddha Shakyamuni’s enlightenment, and is the most revered of all Buddhist sacred sites.

The main temple complex houses the famous Mahabodhi temple/stupa and a descendant of the original Bodhi Tree under which the Buddha gained enlightenment. There are also temples or monasteries from many other nations with a Buddhist tradition such as Tibet and Japan.

Understand[edit]

The man who became the Buddha was born in Lumbini, now in Nepal. He was the son of the local ruler, raised in some luxury and well-educated by the standards of the place and time. As a young man he became a seeker of knowledge, giving up luxuries, travelling a good deal, and learning from several teachers. Bodh Gaya is where he achieved enlightenment while meditating under a tree.

Do[edit]

Bodh Gaya is essentially a pilgrimage destination for Buddhists and all of its main attractions are related to this. The subsidiary tourist industry that has grown up around it (shopping, eating, and accommodation) is not really the main attraction. Perhaps unique to Bodh Gaya are the rather cheesy CDs for sale near the temple entrance that purport to be monks chanting Buddhist texts. You will know whether you want to take this home with you!

Whether you’re a Buddhist or not, the main thing to do in Bodh Gaya is just to absorb the vibe of the place where the Buddha attained awakening: the vapour trail of that energy is still in the air!

Getting There

Gaya airport, 12 kilometers (7 miles) away, has infrequent direct flights from Kolkata. If you’re coming from other major Indian cities, the nearest airport is in Patna, 140 kilometers (87 miles) away. From Patna, it’s a three to four-hour drive.

Bodh Gaya can be easily reached by train. The nearest railway station is Gaya, which is well connected with Patna, Varanasi, New Delhi, Kolkata, Puri, and other places in Bihar. The journey from Patna by train is about two and a half hours.

Bodh Gaya can also be visited as part of a pilgrimage to other Buddhist sites in India. Indian Railways operates a special Mahaparinirvan Express Buddhist Tourist Train. 

Another popular option is to travel to Bodh Gaya from Varanasi by car taking under six hours. 

When to Go

The pilgrimage season starts in Bodh Gaya in September and reaches a peak in January. Ideally, the best time to visit weather-wise is between November and February. Avoid the monsoon season between June and September. The weather gets quite oppressive, followed by heavy rains. Summers, from March to May, are very hot. However, Bodh Gaya still attracts a large number of devotees during this time for Buddha Jayanti (Buddha’s birthday) celebrations, held in late April or May.

What to See and Do

The elaborately carved Mahabodhi temple, Buddhism’s holiest shrine, is the big attraction at Bodh Gaya. The temple was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002. It’s open from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, with chanting and meditation held at 5:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.

The other temples and monasteries, built and maintained by various Buddhist countries, are also fascinating— particularly the different architectural styles. Opening hours are from 5 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Don’t miss the very ornate Thai temple, shimmering with gold.

The towering 80-foot sandstone and granite statue of Lord Buddha is a must-see. It took 12,000 stonemasons seven years to complete.

Bodh Gaya also has an Archaeological Museum displaying an array of relics, scriptures, and ancient statues of Buddha. It is closed on Fridays.

The sacred Dungeshwari Cave Temples (also known as Mahakala Caves), where Lord Buddha meditated for an extended period, are a short distance northeast of Bodh Gaya and worth visiting as well.

Meditation and Buddhism Courses

You’ll find plenty of courses and retreats available in Bodh Gaya. The Root Institute for Wisdom Culture conducts introductory and intermediate meditation and philosophy courses, explained in the Tibetan Mahayana tradition, from October to March.

Those interested in Vipassana Meditation can learn it at the Dhamma Bodhi Vipassana Center, with 10-day residential retreats starting on the 1st and 16th of every month.

Festivals

The biggest festival in Bodh Gaya is Buddha Jayanti, held on a full moon in late April or May each year. The festival celebrates Lord Buddha’s birthday. Other festivals in Bodh Gaya include the annual Buddha Mahotsava, a three-day celebration filled with cultural and religious activities.

The Kagyu Monlam Chenmo and Nyingma Monlam Chenmo prayer festivals for world peace are held around January-February every year. The Maha Kala Puja is conducted at monasteries for several days before the new year, for purification and to remove obstacles.

Where to Stay

If you’re on a strict budget, Bodh Gaya’s monastery guesthouses are an inexpensive alternative to a hotel. The accommodations are basic but clean. It can be difficult to make advance bookings at these places though. You can try the well-maintained Bhutanese monastery (phone: 0631 2200710), which is quiet and has rooms in a garden setting.

It’s also possible to stay at the Root Institute, which is conveniently located near the Mahabodhi temple and offers meditation retreats.

If you’d prefer to stay in a guesthouse, Kundan Bazaar Guest House and Tara Guest House are very popular with travelers. They’re located in the quaint village of Bhagalpur, a five-minute bicycle ride from the center of Bodh Gaya.

Hotel Sakura House has a peaceful location in town and a view of the Mahabodhi temple from its rooftop. Hotel Bodhgaya Regency is the pick of the top-end hotels is not far from the Mahabodhi temple.

Side Trips

A side trip to Rajgir, where Lord Buddha spent much of his life teaching his disciples, is recommended. It’s located about 75 kilometers (46 miles) from Bodh Gaya and can be reached by bus or taxi. There, you’ll be able to visit Gridhakuta (also known as Vulture’s Peak), where the Buddha used to meditate and preach. You can take the aerial tramway/cable car up to the top, for great views. The extensive ruins of ancient Nalanda University, a significant center for Buddhist learning, are also nearby.

Travel Tips

Electricity supply can be erratic at Bodh Gaya, so it’s a good idea to carry a flashlight with you.

It is traditional to take off your shoes before entering the inner parts of the main Mahabodhi Temple complex, as well as any of the monasteries around the area. Wearing loose-fitting respectful clothing and simple sandals is recommended.

The town isn’t very big and can be explored on foot or by bicycle.

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History

A small temple beneath the Bodhi tree, Bodh Gaya, built in 7th century, after the original built by Mauryan Emperor Ashoka in 3rd century BC, ca. 1810 [5]

Ellora · AjantaRatnagiri · UdayagiriBharhut · Barabar Caves

Offerings found in Bodh Gaya under the „Enlightenment Throne of the Buddha“, with a decorated coin of the Kushan emperor Huvishka, 3rd century CE.

According to Buddhist traditions, circa 500 BC Prince Gautama Siddhartha, wandering as an ascetic, reached the sylvan banks of Falgu River, near the Gaya. There he sat in meditation under a bodhi tree (). After three days and three nights of meditation, Siddharta attained enlightenment and insight, and the answers that he had sought. He then spent seven weeks at seven different spots in the vicinity meditating and considering his experience. After seven weeks, he travelled to Sarnath, where he began teaching Buddhism.

Disciples of Gautama Siddhartha began to visit the place where he had gained enlightenment during the full moon in the month of Vaisakh (April-May), as per the Hindu calendar. Over time, the place became known as Bodh Gaya, the day of enlightenment as Buddha Purnima, and the tree as the Bodhi Tree.

The history of Bodh Gaya is documented by many inscriptions and pilgrimage accounts. Foremost among these are the accounts of the ChineseFaxian in the 5th century and Xuanzang in the 7th century. The area was at the heart of a Buddhist civilization for centuries, until it was conquered by Turkish armies in the 13th century.

Mahabodhi Temple

The complex, located about 96 kilometres from Patna24°41′43″N 84°59′38″E / 24.69528°N 84.99389°E / 24.69528; 84.99389, [6]contains the Mahabodhi Temple with the diamond throne (called the ) and the holy Sri Maha Bodhi tree in Sri Lanka, itself grown from a sapling of the original Bodhi tree.

It is believed that 250 years after the Enlightenment of the Buddha, Emperor Asoka visited Bodh Gaya. He is considered to be the founder of the original Mahabodhi temple. It consisted of an elongated spire crowned by a miniature stupa and a on a platform. A double flight of steps led up to the platform and the upper sanctum. The mouldings on the spire contained Buddha images in niches. Some historians believe that the temple was constructed or renovated in the 1st century during the Kushan period. With the decline of Buddhism in India, the temple was abandoned and forgotten, buried under layers of soil and sand.

The temple was later restored by Sir Alexander Cunningham as part of his work for the British Archaeological Society in the late 19th century. In 1883, Cunningham along with Rajendralal Miitra painstakingly excavated the site. Extensive renovation work was carried out to restore Bodh Gaya to its former glory.

Demographics

As of 2001 [update] India census,[8] Bodh Gaya had a population of 30,883. Males constitute 54% of the population and females 46%. Bodh Gaya has an average literacy rate of 51%, lower than the national average of 59.5%; with male literacy of 63% and female literacy of 38%. 18% of the population is under 6 years of age.

Bodh Gaya

Bodh Gaya is the place where Gautama Buddha attained supreme Enlightenment. Bodh Gaya is among the most popular North India attractions which is visited by people of all caste and religion. Though BodhGaya is a sacred Buddhist Pilgrimage but people from all religion come here to receive blessings. This is the most important of the main four pilgrimage sites related to the life of Gautama Buddha, the other three being Kushinagar, Lumbini, and Sarnath. It is a religious place in Gaya district in the State of Bihar.

The Bodhi Tree is the sacred tree under which Lord Buddha meditated and attained nirvana. Pilgrims take back home the leaves of this Bodhi tree as blessings of the lord. It is said that a sapling of the original Bodhi tree was taken from here to Srilank and the Bhodi tree is still present there.

Mahabodhi Temple is a beautiful temple built in the 3rd century at the very spot where Lord Buddha attained enlightenment. Asoka was an ardent devotee of Buddha and it is he who built this temple in lord’s honor. There is a huge and beautiful idol of the Lord inside this shrine.

By plane[edit]

The nearest airport is at Gaya (17 km) – Druk Air flies from Bangkok once a week. Thai Airways flies to Gaya daily. Indian Airlines flies from Kolkata on Fridays at 10.00AM and Returns back on Mondays from Gaya at around 15.00 hrs. Air India fly from New Delhi via Varanassi everyday. Indigo also fly from New Delhi

Alternatively, you may take a flight to the Patna Airport (110 km away) and take a train or a taxi to Bodh Gaya as Patna has multiple daily direct flights to Delhi, Kolkata and Mumbai.Bangkok can be used as a hub to change flight to Kolkata (There are many daily flights Bangkok-Kolkata-Bangkok) and Kolkata is connected to Patna By 4 or 5 Daily Flights. So for South East Asia the best suited connection is Via Bangkok-Kolkata-Patna.

Patna Airport-Bodhgaya-Patna Airport Transfer is available by Punpun Trails (Local Travel Agent) around the year and can be booked online

By car[edit]

One may take a flight to the Patna Airport (110 km away) and take a train or a taxi to Bodh Gaya as Patna has multiple daily direct flights to Delhi, Kolkata , Mumbai, Pune , Bangalore, Lucknow and road is good now but narrow so the journey can be quite slow and dangerous. It takes roughly 3 hours from Patna to reach, on best way is to avoid the Gaya market, as the roads are very narrow.

By train[edit]

The nearest Railway station is Gaya (16 km). From there you can take a bus or a three wheel taxi to Bodh Gaya. Three-wheel taxi price is extremely variable, depending on time of day, but should be between 80-120 Rs. You should bargain considerably, there is rarely a shortage of service.

The train from Patna (which as the nearest good size airport and railhead) to Gaya costs 34 rupees (as of January 2008). The express trains take about two hours. Best train travel from Calcutta is about 8 hours; from Delhi, about 15 hours (2nd class air con costs 1600 rupees; book upstairs at the gaya station then pay downstairs at window 29).

By bus[edit]

There is a main road connecting Bodhgaya and Gaya. The Bihar State Tourism Development Coporation (Tel: 0612-2225411) runs daily deluxe bus services to and from Bodh Gaya. Buses for Varanasi to Bodhgaya, Bodhgaya to Nalanda,Rajgir,Kathmandu

Internet[edit]

Most, maybe all internet cafes in town refuse to let you connect anything to the computer such as a camera or thumb drive, and they refuse to let you upload or download photos.

„Eyes Of Compassion“ Cyber Cafe (EOC) on Bodhgaya Road appears to be the only cafe in town that lets you use skype or upload photos however you have to pay rs. 5 per photo uploaded or rs. 5 per minute that you use skype. The internet is quite slow all over town. Near Om Restaurant, downstairs.

Mohammad’s Restaurant (see ‚Eat‘ section) has free wifi internet access. Ask for password.

Beggars[edit]

There are many beggars in Bodh Gaya, especially outside temple entrances. Sometimes they can be quite persistent. Nevertheless, they are typically not as determined as the rickshaw drivers or street peddlers trying to sell cheap souvenirs at an exorbitant price.

Poverty

India is seen as a rapidly developing country with a high growth rate. While the nation’s poverty rate has been reduced significantly, 17.6 percent of Indians still live below the national poverty line. Since the early 1950s, successive governments have implemented various schemes to alleviate poverty, which have met with partial success. Much of the development has taken place in the larger metropolitan areas, and has not stretched significantly into the rural areas.

The state of Bihar is one of the poorest and most violent regions of the nation. In spite of Bodh Gaya’s illustrious past as the place of Buddha’s enlightenment, many of the city’s people today suffer tremendous hardship. Much attention is given to the city due to the potential of further development as a tourist destination and the profits to be made. There are also organizations working in the city with more altruistic purposes, such as providing education and improving literacy, helping citizens to find employment, medical care, housing and utilities.

Mahabodhi Temple Complex

The Mahabodhi Temple Complex consists of the Temple and seven additional sacred spots. It is divided into two sub-divisions; the principal section which contains the Temple and six of the sacred spots, while the secondary section holds the Lotus Pond (also a sacred spot) where the Buddha meditated in the sixth week following his Enlightenment.

Mahabodhi Temple is constructed of brick and is one of the oldest brick structures to have survived in eastern India. It considered to be a fine example of Indian brickwork, and was highly influential in the development of later architectural traditions. According UNESCO, „the present temple is one of the earliest and most imposing structures built entirely in brick from the late Gupta period.“

Mahabodhi Temple’s central tower rises to 180.5 feet (55 meters), and was heavily renovated in the nineteenth century. The central tower is surrounded by four smaller towers, constructed in the same style.

The Temple is surrounded on all four sides by stone railings, approximately 6.5 feet (two meters) high. The railings reveal two distinct types, both in style as well as the materials used. The older ones, made of sandstone, date to about 150 ). The older railings have scenes such as LakshmiHindu goddess of wealth, being bathed by elephants; and Surya, the Hindu sun god, riding a chariot drawn by four horses. The newer railings have figures of stupas (reliquary shrines) and garudas (eagles). Images of lotus flowers also appear commonly.

The Bodhi tree is the most prominent of the seven sacred spots. It is the tree under which the Buddha sat during his first week of meditation, and under which he gained enlightenment. Eighty feet tall, it is located behind the Temple. It is not the original tree of Buddha’s time, however it is a descendant of that tree. A sapling of the original tree was carried by Emperor Ashoka’s daughter (Sanghamitta) to Sri Lanka. A cutting from that tree was planted in Bodh Gaya when the original tree died. Under the tree is a red sandstone slab known as the Vajrasana, the diamond throne, marking the believed spot of Buddha’s seat of enlightenment.

The following additional sacred spots associated with Buddha’s Enlightenment are also enclosed within the principal temple area. They signify areas on which tradition holds the Buddha further meditated upon the wisdom he had attained. They are connected by pathways and the whole complex is laid out with landscaped lawns and flowering trees.

The final of the seven sacred spots is the lotus pond where the Buddha spent his sixth week. This is the only of the spots separated from the others, but connected to the larger section by flowered pathways.

Hotel Bodh Vilas

Hotel Bodh Vilas is located in Bodh Gaya, just 500 metres from the Karmapa Temple and 2 km from the Mahabodhi Temple. Free WiFi access is available. It was a great and unforgettable experience at BodhVill Hotel. From the beginning you’re feeling a high vibes, energy is so pure inside and around the hotel. From the morning you can enjoy very delicious breakfast and feeling like at home with so much hospitality . I will come back for sure to this blissful place . If you’re going to Bodhgaya highly recommended to stay at this wonderful place .

Hotel M K Plaza

Set in Bodh Gaya, 3.3 km from Mahabodhi Temple, Hotel M K Plaza offers accommodation with a restaurant, free private parking, a shared lounge and a terrace. Staff behaviour, food, room quality is good

Marasa Sarovar Premiere, Bodhgaya

Located in Bodh Gaya, 4 km from Mahabodhi Temple, Marasa Sarovar Premiere, Bodhgaya provides accommodation with a restaurant, free private parking, an outdoor swimming pool and a fitness centre. I really liked the ambience and the silence there . Enjoyed greenery

Maya Heritage

Situated 30 metres from Mahabodhi temple in Bodhgaya, Maya Heritage features a restaurant and free WiFi throughout the property. Guests can enjoy the on-site restaurant. Very good location as it was a quiet area and an easy walking distance from most of the was very clean. The room was spacious and the beds were very was a problem with the hot water one day but it was fixed hotel staff were extremely helpful and pleasant.

Oaks Bodhgaya

Located in Bodh Gaya, 3.6 km from Mahabodhi Temple, Oaks Bodhgaya provides accommodation with a restaurant, free private parking, a fitness centre and a garden. Very friendly and helpful Staff, All facilities were there. Very clean hotel. All meals (breakfast and dinner) were very good and tasty. We enjoyed and had a good safe trip. Thank you

The Bodhgaya Hotel School

The Bodhgaya Hotel School offers accommodation in Bodh Gaya. Free private parking is available on site. The rooms include a flat-screen TV with cable channels. You will find a kettle in the room. A very clean and neat hotel, a quiet place to live, close to the main attractions of hotel is also a school, offering one year training to students from the Bihar region. The whole thing was established by local and Swiss NGO, who wants to help local young people. The staff are very patient and the Indian food cooked by the students are students are under privileged but I can see lots of hope from their eyes and smile. They are all going to work in big hotels in big cities, wish them well!

Bodhi Residency

Located 1 km from Mahabodhi Temple, Bodhi Residency in Bodh Gaya offers a terrace. Very nice place. Staff is very nice and helpful. Room is very clean and very comfortable.

Bodhgaya Regency Hotel

Operating a 24-hour front desk, Bodhgaya Regency Hotel is situated conveniently within 500 metres from Maha Bodhi Temple, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Located in the peaceful corner of the popular tourist destination beds are super comfy and the bathroom was nice staff, helpful and friendly.

SPOT ON 75963 Hotel Prince

Located in Bodh Gaya, within 200 metres of Mahabodhi Temple and 100 metres of Bodh Gaya Bus Station, SPOT ON 75963 Hotel Prince provides accommodation with a shared lounge and as well as free private…

OYO 16395 Hotel G K Palace

Set in Bodh Gaya, Bihar region, OYO 16395 Hotel G K Palace is located 1 km from Great Buddha Statue. Featuring a shared lounge, the 3-star hotel has air-conditioned rooms with a private bathroom.

Jataka Inn

Set 3 km from Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, Jataka Inn features a restaurant and free WiFi throughout the property. Free private parking is available on site. A flat-screen TV is featured. The room size was good. Service staff was very friendly and helpful.

Hotel R K Palace

Featuring a multi-cuisine restaurant, Hotel R K Palace is located in Bodh Gaya. It operates a 24-hour front desk and offers free Wi-Fi access. Well located. Not far from touristic sites. Other hotels in z surrounding. Concerning breakfast.

Bodhgaya Regency Hotel

Operating a 24-hour front desk, Bodhgaya Regency Hotel is situated conveniently within 500 metres from Maha Bodhi Temple, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Located in the peaceful corner of the popular tourist destination Bodhgaya.

OYO 29185 Fun Friday Guesthouse

1.7 km from Mahabodhi Temple, OYO 29185 Fun Friday Guesthouse is situated in Bodh Gaya and features air-conditioned rooms. The nice hotel in quiet place, so you can sleep well. The staff was very kind and helpful.

Hotel Om International

Hotel Om International is a 3-star property in the religious town of Bodh Gaya, famous for being the place where Gautama Buddha is said to have gained enlightenment. Centrally located. CO-operative and helpful quality is reasonably priced and good.

Bodhgaya Seven Inn Hotel n Restaurant

Located in the heart of Bodh Gaya, 500 metres from Mahabodhi Temple, Bodhgaya Seven Inn Hotel n Restaurant features a restaurant and free WiFi throughout the property. Excellent overall accomodation

Hotel Mahamaya

Situated in Bodh Gaya, 200 metres from Mahabodhi Temple, Hotel Mahamaya features accommodation with a restaurant, free private parking and a shared lounge. It was okay from location and dealing of staff side.

How much does it cost to stay in a hotel in Bodh Gaya?

On average, 3-star hotels in Bodh Gaya cost RUB 1,597 per night, and 4-star hotels in Bodh Gaya are RUB 3,155 per night. If you’re looking for something really special, a 5-star hotel in Bodh Gaya can on average be found for RUB 4,625 per night (based on prices).

How much is a hotel in Bodh Gaya for this weekend?

The average price per night for a 3-star hotel in Bodh Gaya this weekend is RUB 2,068 or, for a 4-star hotel, RUB 3,389. Looking for something even fancier? 5-star hotels in Bodh Gaya for this weekend cost on average around RUB 5,665 per night (based on prices).

How much is a hotel in Bodh Gaya for tonight?

On average, it costs RUB 1,999 per night to book a 3-star hotel in Bodh Gaya for tonight. You’ll pay on average around RUB 3,552 if you choose to stay in a 4-star hotel tonight, while a 5-star hotel in Bodh Gaya will cost around RUB 5,665 (based on prices).

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Bodh Gaya is definitely worth visiting.

Bodh Gaya is definitely worth visiting. If the town could do some town planning and not allow arbitrary structures to come up and plan for the next 20, 30 years, then it can become a solid tourist attraction. Currently, it is dirty. The Mahabodhi temple of Buddha is secluded and a must visit. Even there, authority must ensure reasonable quietiude in the premises. We found a nice South Indian restaurant called Tirupati in the town, which was quite good. If one visits Bodh Gaya, one must also make a full day trip to Nalanda and Rajgir.

Hotel Bodh Vilas

It was a great and unforgettable experience at BodhVill Hotel. From the beginning you’re feeling a high vibes, energy is so pure inside and around the hotel. From the morning you can enjoy very delicious breakfast and feeling like at home with so much hospitality . I will come back for sure to this blissful place . If you’re going to Bodhgaya highly recommended to stay at this wonderful place .

Envision Cell

Envision, Centre for Industrial Relations & Entrepreneurship Development (E-cell), IIM Bodh Gaya is a non-profit student organization. We aim at manifesting the entrepreneurial spirit of the young students with a vision to promote innovation and good governance.

Newsletter

The Newsletter club is responsible for gathering news and preparing the quarterly newsletter for Students, Alumni, Teachers of IIM BodhGaya. It covers all the activities, events, student achievements, Guest lectures and articles by students and teachers.

Explography

Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in this world.‘ Explography is a special interest group of IIM BodhGaya connecting the students to varied cultures and people which helps in providing a broader perspective of the world.

By plane[edit]

The nearest airport is at Gaya (10 km) – Druk Air flies from BangkokKolkata and Delhi.

Alternatively, you may take a flight to the Patna Airport (110 km away) and take a train or a taxi to Bodh Gaya as Patna has multiple daily direct flights to Delhi, Kolkata and Mumbai.

By car[edit]

You may take a flight to the Patna Airport (110 km away) and take a train or a taxi to Bodh Gaya as Patna has multiple daily direct flights to Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore, Lucknow and Hyderabad.

The road is very rough and narrow so the journey can be quite slow and dangerous. It takes roughly 3 hours from Patna to reach, on best way is to avoid the Gaya market, as the roads are very narrow.

By train[edit]

The nearest railway station is Gaya, 16 km away. From there you can take a bus or a three-wheel taxi (rickshaw) to Bodh Gaya. Rickshaw prices are variable, but the going rate was ₹20 for shared ride or ₹150 for entire rickshaw no matter what time of the day in April 2015. There is rarely a shortage of rickshaws.

The train from Patna (which as the nearest good size airport and railhead) to Gaya costs ₹25 for passenger train and ₹50 for express non-reserved seat. The fastest express trains in the early morning takes about two and half hours and slow passenger train takes about four hours, which is still comparable to buses. Trains leave one to two hour interval.

Best train travel from Calcutta is about 8 hours; from Delhi, about 15 hours (2nd class air con costs ₹161 – book upstairs at Gaya station then pay downstairs at window 29).

The road from Patna is in bad condition: the train is also recommended.

By car[edit]

By far the most convenient way to get around Bodh Gaya are the auto-rickshaws, cycle-rickshaws, and tourist taxis. As always, make sure to bargain and agree on a price before setting out on the trip. The costs are usually quite low; a few rupees will likely get you most places in the city.

By foot[edit]

Bodh Gaya is very walkable. Most of the major destinations and are within 2 km (about a half-hour walk) from the Mahabdohi Temple complex. There are lots of pilgrims visiting for much of the year, so the streets will have people in them.

As with any location in the Bihar province, avoid walking in the streets alone at night.

Internet[edit]

Most, maybe all internet cafes in town refuse to let you connect anything to the computer such as a camera or thumb drive, and they refuse to let you upload or download photos.

„Eyes Of Compassion“ Cyber Cafe (EOC) on Bodhgaya Road appears to be the only cafe in town that lets you use Skype or upload photos however you have to pay ₹5 per photo uploaded or ₹5 per minute that you use Skype. The internet is quite slow all over town. Near Om Restaurant, downstairs.

Many of the restaurants listed in the „Eat“ section also provide WiFi.

Sacred cow doctrine[edit]

As India is the home of the sacred cow doctrine, seeing cows wandering the streets of Bodh Gaya is not an uncommon sight. It is illegal to strike or otherwise offend cows, so refrain from doing this. Furthermore, be sure drivers of any rickshaws you are in are cautious, as hitting a cow with a vehicle is a very serious crime. Foreigners have been fined heavily for these offences.

Great Buddha Statue

25 meters tall, it is by far the largest and the first Buddha statue ever built in India. Owing to its huge size, it is quite a star-catcher with not just the pilgrims but every tourist in Bodh Gaya. Located right next to the Mahabodhi Temple, this statue was unveiled …

Muchalinda Lake

Named after Muchalinda, the Snake King of the Lake, this lake is yet another peaceful spot in Bodh Gaya. It is believed that during Buddha’s sixth week of meditation, a huge storm broke out here while Buddha was meditating. It was then that Muchalinda came out from …

Indosan Nippon Japanese Temple

15 kilometers away from the holy city of Bodh Gaya is the Indosan Nippon Japanese Temple. Boasting of intricate wooden carvings, this temple is known for its unique and exquisite Japanese architecture and is a perfect example of Buddhist traditions and culture. Housing beautiful Japanese paintings that trace …

Sujatha Temple

Just 2 kilometres away from Bodh Gaya is the Sujata Temple. During Lord Buddha’s journey to enlightenment, he had renounced all worldly pleasures, including food. It was during this time when a tribal woman (named Sujatha) offered to Buddha who was starving from long. It is believed that after …

Chinese Temple

The Chinese temple in Bodh Gaya is situated close to the famous Bodhi Temple. It houses a 200-year old Buddha statue which was brought from China and erected as a sacred shrine. Constructed by Buddhist monks and renovated in the year 1997, this temple displays Chinese architectural styles and has …

Thai Monastery

Of all the monasteries in Bodh Gaya, Thai monastery stands out for its exceptional architecture and stunning beauty. It has a sloping roof covered with golden tiles. Also home to a Thai Temple, the monastery has a 25-meter high bronze statue of Lord Buddha. The place abounds with peace and …

Sujata Kuti

Located approximately 8 kilometres away from the Bodh Gaya city, a lot of tourists and Buddhist followers visit Sujata Kuti as it has huge significance in Lord Buddha’s life. Built in the memory of Sujata (the tribal women who offered kheer to a starving Gautam Buddha), this kuti is a …

Bodhgaya Multimedia Museum

In case you wish to watch (and not see) the significant traces in Buddha’s life, this museum will give you a thorough study dating back 2500 years in a more interesting and informative manner, that is in a visual format. The entire show is divided into four sections which are …

Dungeshwari Hills

Located around River Phalgu, Dungeshwari Caves are a 15-kilometer drive away from Bodh Gaya. The cave-like structure is surrounded by several shrines and stupas. A visit to this spot is a good break from the city as the drive till Dungeshwari is scenic and pleasant . The legend behind the …

Root Institute for Wisdom Culture

Aiming to inculcate an in-depth knowledge on spirituality and practicing Buddhist meditation, the Root Institute for Wisdom Culture in Bodh Gaya offers introductory and intermediate meditation courses for beginners every year from October to March. You need to donate a certain amount to enroll for the course. This includes both …

Burmese Vihara Monastery

Flanked by a lush-green garden, the Burmese Vihara Monastery in Bodh Gaya is a must visit on your trip to the peaceful city. It boasts of a library which has a rich collection of books (in many languages). What’s more, it is also updated with all the basic facilities that …

A combination of all management areas in high-quality research

At IIM Bodh Gaya, we create the conditions and environment for innovation, economic growth, employment and social development. Our research is focused on all management areas such as operations, marketing, finance, HRM, strategic management, and information system etc.

Outstanding Universal Value

The Mahabodhi Temple Complex, Bodh Gaya lies 115 km south of the state capital of Bihar, Patna and 16 km from the district headquarters at Gaya, in Eastern India. It is one of the four holy sites related to the life of the Lord Buddha, and particularly to the attainment of Enlightenment. The property encompasses the greatest remains of the 5th-6th century A.D in the Indian sub-continent belonging to this period of antiquity. The property has a total area of 4.8600 Mahabodhi Temple Complex is the first temple built by Emperor Asoka in the 3rd century B.C., and the present temple dates from the 5th–6th centuries. It is one of the earliest Buddhist temples built entirely in brick, still standing, from the late Gupta period and it is considered to have had significant influence in the development of brick architecture over the centuries. The present Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya comprises the 50 m high grand Temple, the Vajrasana, sacred Bodhi Tree and other six sacred sites of Buddha’s enlightenment, surrounded by numerous ancient Votive stupas, well maintained and protected by inner, middle and outer circular boundaries. A seventh sacred place, the Lotus Pond, is located outside the enclosure to the south. Both the temple area and the Lotus Pond are surrounded by circulating passages at two or three levels and the area of the ensemble is 5 m below the level of the surrounding land. It is also a unique property of archaeological significance in respect of the events associated with the time Lord Buddha spent there, as well as documenting the evolving worship, particularly since the 3rd century, when Emperor Asoka built the first temple, the balustrades and the memorial column and the subsequent evolution of the ancient city with the building of sanctuaries and monasteries by foreign kings over the Main Temple wall has an average height of 11 m and it is built in the classical style of Indian temple architecture. It has entrances from the east and from the north and has a low basement with mouldings decorated with honeysuckle and geese design. Above this is a series of niches containing images of the Buddha. Further above there are mouldings and chaitya niches, and then the curvilinear shikhara or tower of the temple surmounted by amalaka and kalasha (architectural features in the tradition of Indian temples). At the four corners of the parapet of the temple are four statues of the Buddha in small shrine chambers. A small tower is built above each of these shrines. The temple faces east and consists of a small forecourt in the east with niches on either side containing statues of the Buddha. A doorway leads into a small hall, beyond which lies the sanctum, which contains a gilded statue of the seated Buddha (over 5ft high) holding earth as witness to his achieved Enlightenment. Above the sanctum is the main hall with a shrine containing a statue of Buddha, where senior monks gather to the east, a flight of steps leads down through a long central path to the main temple and the surrounding area. Along this path there are significant places associated with events that immediately followed the Buddha’s Enlightment, together with votive stupas and most important of the sacred places is the giant Bodhi Tree, to the west of the main temple, a supposed direct descendant of the original Bodhi Tree under which Buddha spent his First Week and had his enlightment. To the north of the central path, on a raised area, is the Animeshlochan Chaitya (prayer hall) where Buddha is believed to have spent the Second Week. Buddha spent the Third Week walking eighteen paces back and forth in an area called Ratnachakrama (the Jewelled Ambulatory), which lies near the north wall of the main temple. Raised stone lotuses carved on a platform mark his steps. The spot where he spent the Fourth Week is Ratnaghar Chaitya, located to the north-east near the enclosure wall. Immediately after the steps of the east entrance on the central path there is a pillar which marks the site of the Ajapala Nigrodh Tree, under which Buddha meditated during his Fifth Week, answering the queries of Brahmans. He spent the Sixth Week next to the Lotus Pond to the south of the enclosure, and the Seventh Week was spent under the Rajyatana Tree, to the south-east of the main temple, currently marked by a tree.

Next to the Bodhi Tree there is a platform attached to the main temple made of polished sandstone known as Vajrasana (the Diamond Throne), originally installed by Emperor Asoka to mark the spot where Buddha sat and meditated. A sandstone balustrade once encircled this site under the Bodhi Tree, but only a few of the original pillars of the balustrade are still in situ; they contain carvings of sculpted human faces, animals, and decorative details. Further up the central path towards the main temple to the south is a small shrine with a standing Buddha in the back and with the footprints (Padas) of the Buddha carved on black stone, dating from the 3rd century BC when Emperor Asoka declared Buddhism to be the official religion of the state and installed thousands of such footprint stones all over his kingdom. The gateway to the Temple, which is on the central path, was also originally built by this Emperor, but was later rebuilt. Further on the path towards the main temple is a building housing several statues of Buddha and Bodhisattvas. Opposite is a memorial to a Hindu Mahant who had lived on this site during the 15th and 16th centuries. To the south of the pathway is a cluster of votive stupas built by kings, princes, noblemen and lay people. They vary in shape and size, from the simplest to the most sumptuous the context of philosophical and cultural history, Mahabodhi Temple Complex is of great relevance as it marks the most important event in the life of Lord Buddha, the moment when Prince Siddhartha attained Enlightenment and became Buddha, an event that shaped human thought and belief. This property is now revered as the holiest place of Buddhist pilgrimage in the world and is considered the cradle of Buddhism in the history of mankind.Criterion (i): The grand 50m high Mahabodhi Temple of the 5th-6th centuries is of immense importance, being one of the earliest temple constructions existing in the Indian sub-continent. It is one of the few representations of the architectural genius of the Indian people in constructing fully developed brick temples in that eraCriterion (ii): The Mahabodhi Temple, one of the few surviving examples of early brick structures in India, has had significant influence in the development of architecture over the centuries.Criterion (iii): The site of the Mahabodhi Temple provides exceptional records for the events associated with the life of Buddha and subsequent worship, particularly since Emperor Asoka built the first temple, the balustrades, and the memorial column.Criterion (iv): The present Temple is one of the earliest and most imposing structures built entirely in brick from the late Gupta period. The sculpted stone balustrades are an outstanding early example of sculptural reliefs in stone.Criterion (vi): The Mahabodhi Temple Complex in Bodh Gaya has direct association with the life of the Lord Buddha, being the place where He attained the supreme and perfect insight.

The inscribed property contains all the attributes necessary to convey its outstanding universal value. The historical evidences and texts reveal that the parts of present Temple Complex date from different periods. The main Temple, the Vajrasana, the seat of Buddha’s enlightenment was preserved by Emperor Asoka and the Bodhi Tree under which Buddha attained enlightenment witnessed through the ages, the site’s glory, decline and revival since middle of 19th century A.D onwards is unchanged and complete. The main part of the temple is recorded from about the 5th – 6th century A.D. But, it has undergone various repairs and renovation works since then. Having suffered from long abandonment (13th -18th century A.D) it was extensively restored in the 19th century, A.D and more works were carried out in the second half of the 20th century A.D. Nevertheless, the temple is considered to be the oldest and best preserved example of brick architecture in India from this particular period. Even though the structure has suffered from neglect and repairs in various periods, it has retained its essential features intact.AuthenticityThe belief that Buddha had attained Enlightenment in this particular place has been confirmed by tradition and is now called Bodh Gaya, this is of supreme value to the world. It has been documented since the time of Emperor Asoka who built the first temple in 260 BCE when he came to this place to worship the Bodhi Tree, which still stands as witness to the event, along with the attributes of the property (the Vajrasana, etc). Buddhist texts of both Theravadhan and Mahayanan traditions have clear reference of this event of Buddha’s enlightenment at Bodh Gaya. Buddhists from all over the world today venerate Bodh Gaya as the holiest place of Buddhist pilgrimage in the world. This confirms the use, function, location and setting of the complex/ outstanding universal value of the property is truthfully expressed through the attributes present today. The architecture of the Temple has remained essentially unaltered and follows the original form and design. The Mahabodhi Temple Complex has continuous visitation by pilgrims from all over the world to offer prayers, perform religious ceremonies and meditate.

The Mahabodhi Temple Complex is the property of the State Government of Bihar. On the basis of the Bodh Gaya Temple Act of 1949, the State Government is responsible for the management and protection of the property through Bodhgaya Temple Management Committee (BTMC) and Advisory Board. The Committee meets once in every three or four months and reviews the progress and position of the maintenance and conservation works of the property and also manages the flow of pilgrims and tourists visit. The Committee is equipped with 85 regular staff members and over 45 casual workers to attend to the Temple duty as office staff, security guards, gardeners and sweepers. Further consideration is still warranted on the possible designation of the property under national legislation to ensure the protection of its outstanding universal value as well as its authenticity and integrity of the property. Given the significant development pressures in the broader urban and rural setting, the definition of an appropriate buffer zone and the establishment of regulations for its protection is a priority. Options, such as extending the property to include related sites, need to be explored to ensure the conservation of the setting and landscape of the property associated with the life and wanderings of Buddha. The protection of these elements is particularly relevant to sustaining the religious character of the property that substantiates criterion (vi). All developmental activities within the premises of this World Heritage property and at Bodhgaya are guided by the rules and regulations of the Site Management Plan framed by the Government of Bihar. All conservation / restoration works relating to the Temple Complex are taken up under the expert guidance of Archaeological Survey of India. The main source of finance for the property is through the donation from Devotees. The sustained operation of the management system allows for the Temple Complex to be well maintained and flow of visitors managed adequately. As the site is being visited by pilgrims/tourists (national/international) in large numbers, a need to develop infrastructure and public amenities is anticipated. Proposals will need to be preceded by Heritage Impact Assessments and a particular challenge will be to continuously monitor the impact that potential developments of the area as a whole, including the town, may have on the religious and spiritual significance of the Bodhgaya Temple Management Committee also seeks to undertake a sustainable approach to the maintenance of the property for example utilization of solar energy, pollution free environment, etc.

Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya

The Mahabodhi Temple Complex is one of the four holy sites related to the life of the Lord Buddha, and particularly to the attainment of Enlightenment. The first temple was built by Emperor Asoka in the 3rd century B.C., and the present temple dates from the 5th or 6th centuries. It is one of the earliest Buddhist temples built entirely in brick, still standing in India, from the late Gupta period.

Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Ensemble du temple de la Mahabodhi à Bodhgaya

L’ensemble du temple de la Mahabodhi constitue l’un des quatre lieux saints associés à la vie du Bouddha et notamment à son Éveil. Le premier temple a été érigé par l’empereur Asoka au III e siècle av. J.C., alors que le temple actuel date du Ve ou VIe siècle. C’est l’un des plus anciens temples bouddhistes en Inde qui soit toujours debout, et l’un des rares temples de la fin de la période Gupta construits entièrement en briques.

Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0

Conjunto del Templo de Mahabodhi en Bodhgaya

Este conjunto monumental es uno de los cuatro santos lugares relacionados con la vida de Buda, y más concretamente con su acceso a la Iluminación. El emperador Asoka erigió en este sitio un primer templo en el siglo III a.C., pero el actual data del siglo V o VI de nuestra era. Mahabodhi es uno de los más antiguos templos budistas construidos en ladrillo y uno de los pocos de las postrimerías del Imperio Gupta que aún permanecen en pie.

source: UNESCO/ERI Description is available under license CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0